Why 80% of Americans Live East of This Line

  • Am Vor 2 Monate

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Mike B.
Mike B.

As someone who has lived in the West, it's amazing to me to think that those in the East are just a short distance away from anything, meaning walk 20 minutes in any direction and you will find civilization. In the West the distances between the urban centers can be vast with literally nothing in between for hours.

Vor 2 Monate
Mastabla3ta
Mastabla3ta

The hell do you live???? Your describing the midwest lmao

Vor 13 Stunden
Brian Hale
Brian Hale

@Zoomp But Darwin offering us the opportunity to decompose into dirt is totally fine?

Vor 20 Stunden
Zoomp
Zoomp

@Brian Hale dude you are annoying with your prostelatizing

Vor 20 Stunden
Richard Anderson
Richard Anderson

You are right about that! Executives and politicians from the eastern states have little to no comprehension of the distances and travel times between cities within the western interior.

Vor Tag
tsafa
tsafa

Sounds like heaven

Vor Tag
wonday
wonday

He's about 5% off by his own numbers. When he cuts the West he divides it into 50M and 30M giving us 80M west of the line which is (80/330) just over 24%.

Vor Tag
Sam Andersen
Sam Andersen

ok

Vor 21 Stunde
Richard Anderson
Richard Anderson

I disagree with the assertions the creators made in this video; factually there is room for debate. Having spent decades of my life in the arena of water rights and conservation in the Snake and Columbia river drainage areas, drought conditions are not uncommon, and arid conditions can extend for years. Academic modeling of climate conditions is often inaccurate, throw in terms of The Endangered Species Act, Indian tribal claims of fishing rights, and foolish politicians and bureaucrats espousing “existential climate change” for there own purposes of retaining power, influence, and control has all made for very poor decisions regarding water conservation! Solar and oceanic conditions have much more influence on weather patterns in the west than anything else! CA, OR, & WA politicians, bureaucrats, and many academics have made very poor water conservation decisions; the effects of which will play out for decades.

Vor Tag
tsafa
tsafa

Somebody asked me if I lived in a good neighborhood. I told them that any neighborhood that you don't see any other houses from your house is a good neighborhood.

Vor Tag
Damien Lavizzo
Damien Lavizzo

I've driven across the US twice and it's very strange to be in states like Nevada or Oregon, where there are VAST stretches of just nothing, or entire towns that seem to have the same population as the street I grew up on. As someone that grew up in Orange County, places like that are just surreal to me.

Vor Monat
Dawid Smytry
Dawid Smytry

@Majk Bajk It's not the amount of land that's an issue. We can't just turn Mojave desert into Ganges Delta and have few hundred million people living there.

Vor Tag
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

@Senzai The Casual Gamer and it is in a valley & sucks in the heat

Vor 6 Tage
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

@Ryan M they call it Hotlanta for a reason

Vor 6 Tage
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

@Ryan M more than 3000 counties

Vor 6 Tage
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

try Wyoming or the Dakotas

Vor 6 Tage
pebcak
pebcak

When Lincoln was established as the capital of Nebraska (and renamed to Lincoln), it was considered to be the furthest point west where people would want to settle, marking the boundary of the westward great American desert. They even specified the exact location of this boundary to be the intersection of O St and 14th St. To this day it still marks a divider of the east/west population, where half of the state's population lives across a line just east of Lincoln, in the far eastern part of the state. West of Lincoln still remains the West as it did in the late 1800's.

Vor 2 Monate
Paul Bonney
Paul Bonney

Born and raised in Grand Island. 40k ppl largest city between Lincoln and Denver.

Vor 4 Tage
Lord Vorador
Lord Vorador

@ParkerTDM "douchebag" was the word I would of chose... but "outcast" works too. 🙂

Vor 14 Tage
Randy Foss
Randy Foss

@Angela Paden What's bugging you?

Vor Monat
Angela Paden
Angela Paden

@Randy Foss OK guys put a lid on it.

Vor Monat
Matthew M. S., CFP
Matthew M. S., CFP

I had s*x on 14th and O St.

Vor Monat
CR Marsh
CR Marsh

I was born in the west (Arizona) and moved east (South Florida) as a small child and nothing could have prepared me for the massive culture shock. There was so much more…everything. More gas stations, more shopping centers and schools, and especially more people. When I first flew into MIA I was shell-shocked bc I had never seen so many people in one place. Excellent video!!

Vor Monat
Cassini Huygens
Cassini Huygens

I was born in Minnesota and moved to Arizona at 14. Minnesota had the Twin Cities Metro, along with some smaller cities and towns scattered through out the state. Arizona only has three “big”cities, Phoenix, Tuscon, and Flagstaff, but Tuscon is technically medium sized and Flagstaff is a town. The rest of the communities are sparse, small towns that are hours away from each other. Then there is the vast, seemingly never ending desert (or forests if you’re up north). Phoenix, however, is MASSIVE. I grew up in a small suburb of Minneapolis, so it was a bit of a shock moving to a large urban city. Not to mention that Phoenix has some of the widest freeways that I’ve ever seen.

Vor Tag
Ember Evans
Ember Evans

@lovly 2cu Florida definitely gets the most rain, it's so green here! AZ really does get cold, no one expects it because they think Arizona is mostly desert, but the whole Northern half of the state is high elevation. I'm from Show Low, close to the reservation. There's a lake there called Hawley lake that reached the coldest recorded temperature in AZ at -40° in 1971.

Vor 4 Tage
shinyy
shinyy

@lovly 2cu where in AZ ? it’s pretty warm in Phoenix, etc most of the year. it’s a lot colder in prescott, flagstaff etc. Where i live it hasn’t snowed in years

Vor 6 Tage
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

@Ember Evans and green bc it rains at 3pm every day?

Vor 6 Tage
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

@shinyy I grew up in NJ, lived in Orange County CA for 32 years(perfect weather)& moved to AZ per doctors recommendation 4 years ago. I have to leave. No one tells you how cold it gets in December(killed 3 trees), 12 good weeks in the spring & 12 good weeks in the fall(not this year) when you can open the drapes & see outside.

Vor 6 Tage
Shubham Rai
Shubham Rai

This man manages to put line in every country..lol

Vor 2 Tage
LeJunny
LeJunny

I’ve been to every “Western” state, anything West of the Dakota’s and i’ve been there by road and some people don’t realize how EMPTY these states can really be. I drove north across Nevada and didn’t see ANY civilization for roughly 5hrs, I drove 300 miles before seeing another gas station… boy was I glad I had pumped ahead of time when I still had 200 miles in my tank.

Vor Monat
Christian Easter
Christian Easter

I've driven through large parts of Nevada Idaho, and several other western states. One of the strangest things I kept seeing were stoplights out in the middle of nowhere. You couldn't see anything for miles in any direction and yet here I was waiting for a red light to change to green. Is some sort of joke on us easterners?🤔😀

Vor 5 Tage
aazhie
aazhie

@william woolf I have to drive 6 hrs to see my family. It's not that big of a deal for a lot of folks. My dad used to work Cali prisons and would drive all up and down the state on the regular

Vor 18 Tage
aazhie
aazhie

Nevada is so strange. I'm on the coats and it's only about a 6 hrs drive, ye such a massive change

Vor 18 Tage
KillerAndMX
KillerAndMX

I'm not in the US, but driving from Baja California to Baja California Sur is basically a 7hr long drive full of nothing after Ensenada. Maybe a very small town every now and then but its basically empty desert until you get to the state border with BCS, after that thats another 6-8 hours of nothingness until Mulege and even a few more hours until Cabo. People say Nevada is empty, but heck, they have never seen this old empty peninsula below California.

Vor 24 Tage
Rob
Rob

What kind of vehicle did you drive i'm curious not many can go past 300 miles without needing to refuel

Vor 27 Tage
Última Solución
Última Solución

The simple answer is that the West was a foreign country for a very long time and the United States developed on the east coast Keep in mind Mexican rebels like Pancho Villa were still making excursions into Texas and it wasn't until the US army invasion of Mexico that hostilities stopped and that was 1917.. California was almost empty except for Mexicans and probably some outlaws from the Midwest until the gold rush. It's pretty obvious why for anyone who knows a little history so I won't bother watching this video that will no doubt get it wrong and say something dumb like "the weather* or who knows what

Vor Tag
Sam Pond
Sam Pond

I worked in a small rural town in Idaho that fulfilled orders all across the US. Someone from New York city called in one day and asked if I was close to Bosie. I told him "No I'm on the east side of Idaho and Boise is on the west side." He responded "So what like 30 minutes?" I said "try 5 hours buddy."

Vor Monat
Ted
Ted

He meant by car, not horse

Vor 2 Tage
Dpro **
Dpro **

NYC people should know better. If they want to drive 10 blocks in their traffic, they are 5 mf hours out.

Vor 12 Tage
neutrino78x
neutrino78x

@aazhie "someone from NY asked me how far from Humboldt to LA and they COULDN'T fathom it was a 13+ hour drive." Well, same mentality leads Europeans to think we should have HSR all over the USA and you have to remind them of the vast distances involved. Of course we the people of California did approve an HSR from SF to LA...I'm proud that I voted no, what a disaster that project has been, and not needed, because everybody flies that route. 🙂

Vor 17 Tage
The PikachuPeeps
The PikachuPeeps

Lol

Vor 18 Tage
aazhie
aazhie

XD someone from NY asked me how far from Humboldt to LA and they COULDN'T fathom it was a 13+ hour drive. And then I had to remind them San Diego is further south xD

Vor 18 Tage
Rachel Isabelle
Rachel Isabelle

I love that the west side is more untouched and spread out...people annoy me, so the less people the better 🤣I'm also from Australia where 80% of the country is unlivable so moving to the west side of the US with things spread out really wasn't much of an issue for me. I also just love all the mountains on the west side of the country, so beautiful!!

Vor Monat
J131
J131

Agreed. I love that so much of the west is still natural and undeveloped lands. Even the empty deserts are incredible.

Vor Monat
Lorddess
Lorddess

The Western United States has one of the most beautiful and diverse ecosystems in the country! So much to see and do for every one!!

Vor Monat
Aqua Walker
Aqua Walker

At least you don't have to worry about crime. I want to move somewhere really far away from civilization and just be alone by myself with nature. Cities really piss me off everything becomes more cluttered, less and less privacy, people are always irritating. Loud music, drugs, homelessness, crime, worse drivers, light pollution, and noise pollution. If it meant fresh produce, water sources, and the nearest gas station are fewer and further away so be it. (20yr Male) I was born and raised south of Chicago and the Urban lifestyle is kind of annoying me more and more. I was able to travel to South Korea stayed there for a year recently because I'm Active Duty Military. You know in Korea the landscape is like all the cities are near rivers but everything is dissected by huge steep foresty green mountains so you see clusters of the large apartment complexes and everything for miles in between is rural mountains and farmland. So their urban population centers are really cramped, the US military buys land for cheap on really crappy land that no one wants because it'll be in like prone to flooding or something or in a bunch of trees or a swamp. Camp Carroll was this really nice off the grid base, nice spacious and mostly rural and empty inside the Waegwan area. Up north is the Main Military base Humphreys which is a 5 hour drive north from where I was. Humphreys (near Seoul) Largest Overseas military base. Humphreys is like the complete opposite of cozy Rural. It's this flat Urbanized metropolis sprawl, with palm trees and avenues. More like a Los Angeles or Las Vegas looking decadent thing. Everytime I had to go up there for a Shooting Range, or a class or something I was just really pissed off and idk why. Everything on Humphreys looked like a casino or a strip mall. I'm happy I left Korea and am going to KS soon and I'm hoping I get to see a more rural location, since it is literally center America. I'm a more quiet and laidback peaceful solitary person, the high stakes city, urban utopia of Korea was not for me. Good ol' America can show me some more Western small town rural desolate geography. I want the more classical American vibe where I live.

Vor 15 Stunden
LIVE LIKE MATEO ♥️🔥
LIVE LIKE MATEO ♥️🔥

Great video! I have driven throughout this amazing country but have always lived in the west California, Arizona, Oregon and Washington state. You can’t drive anywhere in the West without either being in the mountains or mountain ranges in view. The first time driving East through the flat Midwest was definitely an eye opener. The western US is probably the best geological masterpiece on earth. From the beaches, rainforests, glacial mountains to the most desolate deserts. It never gets old exploring it.

Vor Monat
Joey_BK_86
Joey_BK_86

@Ethan Mietzner To each their own…I live in California, born in New York, raised in Florida and partly in Puerto Rico…the west is nice and all but the “beaches” are trash and the bodies of “water” are a joke. Of course you miss where your from lol it’s what your used to but one doesn’t make the other one less beautiful.

Vor 3 Tage
Ethan Mietzner
Ethan Mietzner

@A Guest I'm from Washington state and have moved to Georgia for college. I can't even tell you how depressed I've been missing my home state and all the mountains and hikes I've taken for granted. It's a major bitterness inside of me and I want to move back where my family is so badly. The west is so much better than the east, it isn't even a fair comparison.

Vor 11 Tage
A Guest
A Guest

Live like mateo, I agree. I was born and raised in the west. I've had to move to the east coast. It is pretty and interesting in very different ways. But after only six months here , I find I'm missing the views and beauty we take so for granted in the West: the mountains, the deserts, the canyons, the forests, the wide open plains and the big skies of the west. It is like an ache inside me. The beauty of the east is different, in scope and scale. I'm missing the glory and majesty of the wide open west way more than I ever thought I would. I didn't realize how much I miss real mountains, either admiring the view from their feet or breathless at their heights looking down over the vast lands below.

Vor Monat
Jake Aurod
Jake Aurod

The Midwest can get really flat, like in central Illinois where the glaciers scraped through, but it's still fairly wet and well populated. Once you leave the Midwest and get into the Plains west of the Mississippi River, it gets flat and unpopulated.

Vor Monat
2007tuber loves videos
2007tuber loves videos

This video should be shown in all schools in US. Wow - so packed with information! Details and maps and more maps! Simply amazing piece of work you produced here! 5 stars ⭐Bravo!! (OH and the comments 9,824 add so much more to the main story - so many people lived this story!)

Vor Monat
Adric Braithwaite
Adric Braithwaite

Yeah, when I moved from East coast to West coast (I drove), I was shocked by how different everything felt when I got to western Nebraska. I had always been used to having an exit with a rest stop, gas station, etc every 10 miles or so. Wyoming was especially frightening because you could go 90 or 100 miles without a single exit, and then if there was one, there was no guarantee it wouldn't be a dirt road or something. I filled up the tank whenever I could. Stunningly beautiful though! First time I ever saw true wilderness as opposed to countryside. Then the sun set to a fiery red horizon and the stars and the milky way came out. Still remember it clearly.

Vor 2 Monate
ChapeauMill
ChapeauMill

I experienced the opposite moving to the East Coast after growing up in the West. Didn’t understand how I could get so far away from the big cities and still be surrounded by people. I got used to it though, and when I moved to Salt Lake City a few years ago I remember still being really shocked by how empty it was driving between here and where I’m from in the Pacific NW.

Vor Monat
Bradley Howard
Bradley Howard

The real issue is don't miss an exit. If you do you'll be debating on breaking the law by going the wrong way or calculating how long it'll take you to hit the next exit and do a 180.

Vor Monat
0 0o0
0 0o0

ya wyoming exits were little dirt patches with nothing -- just like a place where monsters would come and get you - man that was a creepy interstate.

Vor Monat
silver Sun
silver Sun

Although Wyoming has some lovely green areas like Yellowstone, most of it is desert and very windy. If you are driving through WY, be careful to stay away from large trucks on the road because a gust of wind can knock them over in seconds.

Vor 2 Monate
RDDHopsing77
RDDHopsing77

You should try driving across Australia if you want to know what isolation feels like. A country roughly the same area as the USA (excluding Alaska) but instead of having 325 million people it only has 25 million. You go from the tropical North, close to the equator, to Tasmania in the south where the next stop is Antarctica. From the lush Pacific east coast to the mostly dry Indian Ocean west coast. Where freight is hauled by trucks called road trains. A prime mover with a number of trailers and can be over 50 metres long, travelling at over 100 km/hr. You can travel for days and not see anyone. Where communities are so isolated health care is provided by The Royal Flying Doctor Service which consists of 79 specially modified Pilatus and Beechcraft aircraft which can each accommodate 5 patients plus doctors and nurses. Like the people who live in the isolated areas of North America the people who live in these remote areas are a special breed.

Vor 2 Monate
Natasha York
Natasha York

Born and raised in the west. I don't think I would have it any other way. I could tell what the two lit up cities were on each side of me. We actually had a group of college students come down with their instructor and they were stargazing, we have great views because there's not a lot of light pollution. Sometimes it sucks having to travel far due to limited resources, but rural Northern Nevada is what I know.

Vor Monat
Old Arthur Morgan
Old Arthur Morgan

The west is so much better it seems like a city in a ton of beautiful scenery and actual wildlife while east seems like a ton of cities and a ton of shit going on with a bit of green and lush trees

Vor Monat
J'Hue Casey
J'Hue Casey

The night sky in parts of the West is amazing. I was in North Dakota for a while and looked at the sky more than I had since I was 8 or 9 years old. It's amazing what all you see in the night sky that you never get to see even living in more rural areas in the Midwest. And forget the bigger cities where you only get to see about 5-20% of the stars in the sky on any given night.

Vor Monat
grizzly axolotl
grizzly axolotl

as a californian who loooovvvvess nature, i consider myself blessed to live in the west. the nature here is just magnificent. in just my state alone, the diversity is insane! beaches, mountains, desert, cities, we got it all. love it so much.

Vor Monat
Shrelmo
Shrelmo

@Timothy Pickard Swag like Ohio.. Swag like Ohio

Vor 4 Tage
Augusto TP
Augusto TP

@WesGamer california is only good for the rich ppl, its a state that is going bankrupt bcs of democrats politics

Vor 17 Tage
WesGamer
WesGamer

Love California for the reasons mentioned above. It's one of the wonders of this world; beach 30 mins to my west and snow top . I like how some people from cheaper states feel salty because they can't afford to live here.

Vor 18 Tage
Augusto TP
Augusto TP

@grizzly axolotl you probably a democrat

Vor 25 Tage
Warren G
Warren G

@Timothy Pickard I've lived in SoCal my whole life. If you apply yourself and have the right qualifications, you can find really good paying jobs in just about any industry or run your own business to afford the cost of living here. We have the largest economy than any other state for a reason.

Vor 25 Tage
FunPheonix97
FunPheonix97

Damn! I grew up in Minnesota and I’ve been to Colorado (Colorado Springs) and Nevada (Las Vegas). Even there I could tell there was a difference I couldn’t explain. Things felt more relaxed in CO Springs I guess, and then with Vegas, it’s in a desert and Minnesota obviously has no deserts in it 🤣 no deserts or mountains here. We do have farms and forests, though. I really want to visit places like the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone! I want to see the salt flats in Utah, I want to see the night sky with no light pollution whatsoever. I have a great uncle that lives in Montana and works in the portion of Yellowstone that’s in Montana. I’m sure he has beautiful views ❤

Vor Monat
Anthony Wardell
Anthony Wardell

As a person who has lived all over the place, it’s really hard to adjust from living in the middle of nowhere to metropolitan areas. I get anxiety because of the sheer bulk of things happening vs the stillness found in the middle of the Rockies

Vor 6 Tage
poshko41
poshko41

I moved to the Phoenix metro area from the east coast and this remoteness outside of the populated areas was striking to me. Even in the rural areas of the east, there's almost always evidence of some form of human presence (a cornfield, a gas station, etc.). If you drive in any direction north, south, east, or west of metro Phoenix, you can go literally hundreds of miles without seeing anything but the road, your car, the fairly steady stream of traffic, and a seemingly unending landscape of nothingness. It's a surreal experience.

Vor 2 Monate
lovly 2cu
lovly 2cu

Drove from Phx to Tuscon last month-nothing but scrub

Vor 6 Tage
Heather
Heather

Literally just did the drive from Mesa to Vegas, and there are literally towns with gas stations and full service truck stops less than 100 miles apart, all the way up.

Vor Monat
Heather
Heather

Not on the 10. Phoenix metro area to Tucson metro area is less than 100.

Vor Monat
inhaleexhale
inhaleexhale

@Gsl Vqz it's modern and thriving because Phoenix is sucking the water out of the Colorado River. Get your own water.

Vor Monat
inhaleexhale
inhaleexhale

@Eric Hayes You have seven states all using the Colorado River, and the river is dying. Arizona and Colorado are working to depend on the river less. Swimming pools are irresponsible in the desert. So it isn't "okay" to build an in-ground pool in the desert; do you want to ignore reality? Your comment made zero sense.

Vor Monat
TheMrCrow
TheMrCrow

I was vaguely aware of this divide, but didn't realize how drastic it was. Very educational, thank you!

Vor Monat
Boone Richardson
Boone Richardson

Great video! I grew up in Georgia but have spent all of my adult life around the west. I simply love the American west. From the epic mountains, to the gorgeous deserts, to the PNW rain forests. It’s really a remarkable, massive area. The droughts and wildfires are an existential problem for many areas though…

Vor Monat
John Long
John Long

Thanks!

Vor Monat
John Long
John Long

10-4 Boone, everything east of Van Horn sucks to me, based on the damn humidity, tornados, hurricanes and so forth and yes, I like to live in New Mexico - take care!

Vor Monat
David Lopez
David Lopez

I'm so proud to be from the West coast. It's crazy to fathom how much influence the West has, it truly is a bubble. California alone, would be the 5th largest economy if it were a country. Contributes the most than any other US state.... We can also thank the West coast (bay area) for this video's software since this is where Youtube was born, twitter, Uber... small population but very very mighty!

Vor Monat
Comrie Krystyna
Comrie Krystyna

This is one of the more amazing videos I’ve watched on YouTube. It’s extremely educational and i never realized a line divided the US like this!

Vor Monat
Colby Stearns
Colby Stearns

As someone who lives in Southern California, I think this is really interesting! In a way this is sort of similar to Australia and China in that most of the population lives on the East Coast and the West is mostly isolated and scattered.

Vor 2 Monate
Роман Х
Роман Х

@Dan Mur none of what you said contradicts my points or applies to people in the lower classes. Of course there are lots of upper-income people and life is good for them, unless they don't like driving. But the higher staff at Disney and SpaceX doesn't mingle with the common folk in LA and that's a fact. The jobs are spread out like you said so there are not many places with high income diversity. The energy I was referring to is the creativity that's specific to cities. In remote areas, people tend to be conservative, while in dense areas, people innovate. It's a very simple and understandable concept that flies right past you. I think you have an issue with New York because it's ugly and gritty. Try going to a proper big city in Europe, life can be quieter and healthier when people are "stacked up" as opposed to spread out. LA Times had a headline yesterday "LA's love of sprawl made it America's most crowded place". Look into it. A proper continuum from high to low density is always better for everyone involved.

Vor Monat
Dan Mur
Dan Mur

@Роман Х As far as theft and crime--LA has its issues true. I've had a bike stolen in certain areas. But even in these areas, there's not as many products locked up behind cases as in NYC. While I've left my laptop unattended frequently at any random Starbucks around LA metro while going to the bathroom, I've never felt confident to do the same in NYC. In LA, I tend to leave my car unlocked at both places I've lived (even parked on the street), and at work, and haven't had an issue yet in decades (knock on wood). I don't know I could do the same in most of Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx, etc. I don't think size matters or the amount of people. The NYC conurbation is 22 million people. LA conurbation is 19 million people. Not as large but not a big difference in population. It's just LA has more space--it's more spread out horizontally so everyone is not stacked on top of each other.

Vor Monat
Dan Mur
Dan Mur

@Роман Х I don't think NYC has a lot of cohesion. There's a lot of new Yorkers that walk past people sleeping on streets daily. Last time I was there, a woman approached a power walker for information and he kept on walking ignoring her. She called him an a hole. Maybe it's because I didn't grow up in a city like NYC, but I wouldn't call the madness there "an energy". I find it chaotic and loud, overwhelming. You can't hear yourself think. Too many people in a small space--which feels worse in the hot humid summers. Elbow to elbow. That's not my idea of ideal living. And there's plenty of highly skilled highly paid upper middle class workers around LA. For crying out loud LA metro has been home to corporate headquarters for Disney, SpaceX, Snapchat among others. The California Institute of Technology, UCLA, USC, Pomona College, Harvey Mudd among other top ranked universities are also in the metro. The rovers on Mars? Built and operated by the good people at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (operated by Caltech) in Pasadena. Any industry one can name, LA has it. I come across highly paid people daily (I in fact directly interact with our company CEO, COO, CFO, etc.). It's not really an NYC unique thing.

Vor Monat
Kerry Hart
Kerry Hart

Australia, grew up in Victoria, moved to Perth WA, the climatic & population difference east to west is the same...

Vor Monat
Corey Levine
Corey Levine

@Buck Rothschild The People in California are good it just the politicans in the West that mess up if you look at Oregon,Washington,Nevada,and Colorado not just California

Vor Monat
Eric Stoltz
Eric Stoltz

Correction needed the Rocky Moutains actually end in El Paso, Texas not New Mexico

Vor Tag
Ted
Ted

Having grown up in Los Angeles and lived in Baltimore for college, the weird thing to me is you can drive half an hour out from downtown Los Angeles in any direction and anywhere you go, houses and stores are right next to each other. On the east coast, half an hour out from any major city like Philadelphia or Baltimore and you’ll see single stores and houses by themselves with no contiguois neighbors. Wasn’t until I was on the east coast that I saw some houses with no fences because the plots of land were that big. The west is simultaneously more densely and less densely populated than the east coast depending on if you’re looking at a city, state, or coastal level. Having lived in Austin for two years, it was even more trippy seeing stores spaced hundreds of feet apart not far from the city center.

Vor 2 Tage
drLogo
drLogo

When the line goes straight through where you live in the thumbnail

Vor Tag
King Death9
King Death9

The West is very nice and for mountain ranges what about Mt Humphreys

Vor 12 Stunden
Jacob Hauenstein
Jacob Hauenstein

When I turned 18 I did a roadtrip from Vermont (North East, close to Maine, New Hampshire, New York) to Los Angeles. I think everyone should make a trip like this if you live in the United States. The appreciation it will give you for this countries structure, geography, and cultures is worth so much more than I thought. However large you imagine the distance to be, I can assure you it is larger.

Vor 2 Monate
James Rose
James Rose

@Ania It's an experience that definitely sticks with you for life. The strong relationship I have with my brother to this day is still very much impenetrable. Thank you for your comment. 😀

Vor Monat
Ania
Ania

@James Rose oh wow that’s freaking amazing! I can’t imagine you ever forgetting about that experience

Vor Monat
chaos witch
chaos witch

@brownjatt21 all great points!

Vor Monat
brownjatt21
brownjatt21

@chaos witch it all depends what you're trying to see. The west coast, and the western states have better landscapes and more national parks etc (i live in California). But say you're a tourist wanting to explore more into America's historical and cultural sites. Than the east coast is better since it has more history and diversity. Think about it, the US was settled from east to west. The east coast has much more offer in those terms. All the big cities of the east have a lot to offer as well. Boston, NYC. Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington DC, Atlanta, Miami etc not to mention all the beautiful smaller coastal cities like province town, Charleston, Savannah, st Augustine (Americas oldest city), Florida keys to name a few. But Yea once again each coast is beautiful in its own way. Even though i live in California, I'd say there's just as much if not more to see and do in the east coast just because it's more well established and has a population twice as much as the west coast. But speaking strictly road trip up or down either coast and the west coast wins that.

Vor Monat
chaos witch
chaos witch

@brownjatt21 thank you experienced person. Tell them the real beauty lies on the west coast, from Vancouver to Ensenada Mexico (or any west coast road trip in between). I would hate myself if I did that east to west coast drive. It's like wanting to go to Italy but first driving through the Sahara, stopping off in Morocco, crossing to Portugal through Spain and France to Italy and then wondering why the hell you started in Africa to begin with. Start in Italy, see France, Spain, Portugal and then Morroco. If you're unsatisfied, then see the Sahara and delve deep into Africa. Yes, in my analogy New York is central Afrika. Go there if you want but don't start there to see the best and most beautiful the US has to offer, the west mofo coast.

Vor Monat
Wooski Onehundred
Wooski Onehundred

It’s crazy how many different landscapes the U.S have particularly in the West, it feels as if your in another Country. Southern Utah is completely different from Northern Utah. Washington have so many different beautiful scenic views, especially Central Washington. The Western half of the U.S may have the most beautiful landscapes in the world.

Vor Monat
Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction

We live in central WA. Very scenic indeed.

Vor Monat
Tyler Kriesel
Tyler Kriesel

Adding to the tree thing, palm trees were brought into California from Florida by the Spanish. They aren’t native to California or a lot of the south west. The Spanish thought the deserts there were to boring and brought them in from Florida. They still ship them out to this day. One of the biggest palm tree farms is in homestead Florida.

Vor Monat
Garrett Stephens
Garrett Stephens

I live in the area that is regarded as the dark area. I live west of the 98th meridian, but east of the Pacific Northwest and it feels way too crowded here. I cannot even imagine how the people in the Eastern part of the state feel.

Vor Monat
Greg Titus
Greg Titus

Amazingly insightful. Explains so much of what underlies our problems coping with the environment in the US. Excellent video. Thanks so much!

Vor Monat
tg72201
tg72201

I drove from Arkansas to California and back recently, and it’s really amazing to watch the landscape change like this. You can feel the land getting more and more parched as you go until you hit the dramatic, dry expanse of the Mohave desert where there is basically no life. As cool as the west is, coming back into the dense forests of the eastern United States was really comforting. I think we’re programmed to recognize dry places as hostile to our existence.

Vor 2 Monate
Nav R1
Nav R1

I was born and raised in southern California. I been to Minnesota, Florida Virginia, New York , Boston. It's very flat , green and bushy. I always thought of bushy areas of the east are for a serial killer to dump bodies and never be found... I never drove throughout the eastern US but this is Westside for life !

Vor 2 Monate
Adam Fuller
Adam Fuller

@Bob Sacamano rain. Rain is awesome. Oh and birds are more brightly colored east of the rockies.

Vor 2 Monate
C J
C J

@Laser Tillison Yeah I love it. In Utah once you leave I-15 in a few miles in any direction it's pretty much all open wilderness. Having the ability to easily be truly alone is rare resource. I lived back east for a short time and those 'tree tunnels' for roads and towns everywhere made me feel trapped. I'm just used to seeing a really long way in every direction. Now if we could just figure out a way to take some of the frequent flood water from the east and get it out here we'd be all set.

Vor 2 Monate
Denys Arcuri
Denys Arcuri

@Clayton Newberry Interesting. There is almost NO Mojave Desert in Arizona! Almost ALL of Arizona's desert is Sonoran, just like us in the Coachella Valley of Southern California. Having lived on the desert for so long, you ought to know which desert you live in.

Vor 2 Monate
Jerry Lisby
Jerry Lisby

@Denys Arcuri I don't know but wouldn't lose sleep over it. Just being funny. 😄

Vor 2 Monate
Geoffry Smith
Geoffry Smith

When I was a kid, growing up on the East coast in the 50s and 60s, I was interested in reptiles. One of my field guides declared that "The West is considered to start at the 100th meridian." "OK, I thought, West Texas...and it's all about rainfall." So imagine my surprise when early in this video they started talking about the 98th meridian. A few minutes later, (John Wesley Powell, etc) it clicked in. The West is moving East. One of the many ways we're in trouble. But - I do love the West. My soul expands out there. Big sky, mesas, vast spaces - all of it.

Vor Monat
Over The Road With Joe
Over The Road With Joe

For someone in the west that doesn't live in the popular place, I don't mind living where I do. There are some issues that have the problem with water such as California (all of it), there are places like where I live in eastern Washington that don't have that same issue. One of the differences that you forgot to mention was the difference between the lines is on the east side they grow more food as corn, as you stated, but on the western side we do more livestock. Great video and have a great night.

Vor Monat
noWonder
noWonder

I grew up in the east but just this year started exploring out west more and it is striking how different it feels up until you reach the coast. I kind of liked it though. Empty but full of extreme natural beauty. Thats not to say that the east coast isn't beautiful but its certainly not as striking and grand as the west. I visited Washington and Montana this past year and hope to explore the even more arid southwest this coming year

Vor Monat
Raddy101
Raddy101

@Jimmy garcia Garicia it is pretty good

Vor Monat
Jimmy garcia Garicia
Jimmy garcia Garicia

@Raddy101 The west is the best!!!.

Vor Monat
noWonder
noWonder

@The Wise Witch nothing terrain wise compares to the grandeur of the west, but what the east has is beautiful lush forests that nothing out west can compare to. Appalachia feels ancient in a very cool way. I love them both. Being a hiker and mountain enthusiast I think I'd prefer living out west, personally but they both have their place in my heart.

Vor Monat
The Wise Witch
The Wise Witch

Lol I'm the opposite! Born in CO, been travelling around the west recently. Montana too. I'm in Washington now but am moving out east. I've never explored over there so am excited ✌🏼😁

Vor Monat
Raddy101
Raddy101

Every area of the world has natural beauties, if you look at it from a biological and ecosystem perspective. Some areas of the world are clearly not fit for human populations, or at least not large human populations, they are better suited to continue to be wild as natural. Other areas are suited for all kinds of life, including humans. Our challenge is to work together with nature to create a system that provides a relative abundance of basic needs being met for all, by maximizing our technical efficiency through the application of advanced technology and human cooperation. We are going to need a system change to do that. We can't have a system of profit maximization and infinite growth on a planet with finite resources. We can, however, meet all human needs, without labor-for-income in our modern age if we work with science and nature. Then, we can have the freedom, health and sustainability we desire and plenty of time to go explore the beautiful nature around us.

Vor Monat
Charles Koehler
Charles Koehler

You had me until “rapid climate change” - that is unless you are referring to persistent jet contrail cloud cover and microwave ionospheric heaters. Very nice presentation, though.

Vor Monat
Samuel_사무엘
Samuel_사무엘

I’m from Salt Lake City, and I’ve never gone past “the line” and I’ve never seen the ocean. It doesn’t bother me. It’s just weird to think that I live in a bowl with 2,660,000 people (Wasatch front) in an isolated bubble. I’ve always wanted to drive to New York just to see the endless small towns that people talk about existing. Heck I’ve never been in a metro sprawl with more than 5,000,000 people. And Phoenix was enough of a trip. I could see a huge city from end to end and it felt infinite. In Utah you look any direction and the buildings and homes end with mountains.

Vor 2 Monate
Deanna Cousin
Deanna Cousin

You MUST see the ocean!!! A-M-A-Z-I-N-G!!!!!!

Vor 2 Monate
Doris Sun
Doris Sun

You can come Yellowstone and see animals. It's a lot of fun.

Vor 2 Monate
Dr. Dude
Dr. Dude

@Douglas K it's because of the way Brigham Young designed the streets for wide wagons, which worked well for cars.

Vor 2 Monate
Joseph Bell
Joseph Bell

@Fly Dragon How is Salt Lake City bigger than Las Vegas? Explain please

Vor 2 Monate
Slender Man 186
Slender Man 186

@Nicholas Crowe this. I’m from West Virginia, I’ve been to DC, have been through New York on the way to Boston, and honestly, I’m not impressed and couldn’t care for any of those cities for roughly the same reasons you mentioned.

Vor 2 Monate
mnpd3
mnpd3

A lot of great information in your video. Thank you! But, one error...I live in Tennessee and no precip has ever come from the east. Rain in all seasons comes from an arc defined by the northwest from the southwest. Strong winds from the south in winter bring both springlike temps and storms, but due to the counterclockwise rotation of systems the rain always arrives from the southwest. Rain from the northwest is more likely to occur in summer. On the global warming thing, a human lifespan is long enough to see changes in the weather but is far too short to notice changes in climate. Until we can figure out how to live at least a few hundred thousand years, we are not going to see changes in global climate.

Vor Monat
grace
grace

We are incredibly blessed to live in a country with such diverse terrains and climates that there is truly something for everyone. I live in South Carolina but have lived my entire life in a number of states up and down the east coast from New England to South Florida and in-between. The furthest west I have been is Houston, TX. I met a girl who moved here from Narco,California and we went on a trail ride in spring (we are horse people) shortly after she had moved here and she could not get over how green everything was or the size of the trees or forests for that matter because where she is from is nothing but rock, brown dirt and little scrub trees. I thought how strange to never see green and also thought no way would I want to live in a place like that. Only plus was that where she was from you could get on your horse and just ride anywhere you wanted.

Vor Monat
grace
grace

@GenoX interesting though I'm sure it's beautiful there it's not a place you would think a lot would move to. They say the Charleston area is the fastest growing area on the entire east coast and I believe it. SC does get very humid and hot, 90% and up humidity in summer is norm I will warn you of that. You will be close to the Swamp Rabbit Trail (all paved easy scenic trail) which is I believe 22 or 25 mile bike ride into Greenville (starts and ends from !Greenville to Travelers Rest or vice versa), fantastic biking trail with many places to stop and grab a bite to eat or coffee along it's route, highly recommended it. Halls Chophouse in Greenville is an absolute must for the best steaks, its original home is in downtown Charleston, a family owned restaurant. 😉 Very welcome, all the best to your and your father.

Vor Monat
GenoX
GenoX

@grace sounds awesome. It seems like so many people moving everywhere in a way.. my hometown Minnesota seems to have grown exponentially.. wth is everyone coming from to overcrowd places everywhere, it's bizarre. And btw, thanks for your feedback.

Vor Monat
grace
grace

@GenoX well I think you will really enjoy it, it's a beautiful area all around there, a very shirt drives to the blueridge mountains. I love living in SC, just miss the quaint town that was the area I live I till everyone came to move here. I love and adore Charleston, not a city girl at all but historic Charleston has a very special place in my heart and I love it.

Vor Monat
GenoX
GenoX

@grace I wouldn't be moving there if it weren't for my dad. He's getting up there in age, need to look after him if he needs it.

Vor Monat
grace
grace

@GenoX ok yeah thats right next to Greenville. It's a really nice area. I live 40 min outside Charleston. Everyone and their grandmother is moving to SC from all over the country most either head to Greenville area or down my way, especially down my way it's changed so much. I've lived here for 26 years and in the past 5 years it's been crazy how many have moved here, miss the way it used to be before everyone started moving here bit it is what it is.

Vor Monat
Sinepilot
Sinepilot

We just drove from CA to MI this past July, and this line is very obvious while driving through Nebraska. From Denver on the eastern edge of the Rockies all the way to mid-Nebraska is just brown, flat and endless. Then, pretty much immediately, it turns to lush green rolling hills all the rest of the way. I got my Bachelor's at Iowa so I'd already been through here several times, but the line seemed so obvious this time. I've always assumed it was due to a major river or something.

Vor Monat
V3ntilator
V3ntilator

In "Telemark Vestfold" in south Norway, you can pass 10 cities in only 1 hour on the highway. Population in them ranges from 30.000-65.000 in each of them. They are all coastal cities btw.

Vor Monat
Hoai chau
Hoai chau

I remember learning the weight of clouds in 3rd grade and being scared of them falling on me because I had just learned abt gravity before that

Vor 13 Tage
Done OwN
Done OwN

So , having been looking for "out of the way" place I stayed overnight , camping on acreage inTres Piedres , NM. it had once been a camp for troubled kids to go , and get training to increase their confidence & get counseling, I believe(?) . Anyway , it had failed but their projects (in process , when the left) really made it attractive . It was so remote, I may have heard 2 or 3 cars go past , on distant road. So , I kept having this vision of bigfoot , coming out of the nearby wooded areas , & passed on purchase.

Vor Monat
Duco H
Duco H

I visited the USA (California, Nevada, Utah, Coloroda and Arizona) when I was 10 with my family. I come from one of the most densily populated countries in Europe: the Netherlands. I will never forget how amazed I was about all these roads in the states after east of California. Just a road going in the same direction, with not a sign of civilization other than the road itself in between for hours and hours, but then all of a sudden there was a mall with 5 clothing stores, a parking lot and a McDonalds and Burger King. And after some shopping again nothingness for hours.

Vor Monat
Kim Horton
Kim Horton

I’ve had 75 years to decide where I want to live and I’m close to the middle of the States in Arkansas. As my kids grew up and left the house I retired and decided to spend my time walking, reading and riding a motorcycle. Arkansas has followed Eastern Tennessee where I found the riding and walking were absolutely stellar. I have since moved(after six years) to North Central Arkansas and while the riding isn’t as good, it’s still very good. It suits what I like at the moment. In that Western part of your map I find gas is farther apart and roads aren’t as dense. I like having multiple roads that give me more than one path between here and there a big advantage. Next? I have no idea. At this age I have a cute little house on three acres with no near neighbors. I may stay! Whoda thunk it!?

Vor Monat
Mypheelz
Mypheelz

Wow, that sounds amazing. Population is definitely a good thing to get away from once in awhile.

Vor 7 Tage
Mark O'Shea
Mark O'Shea

Stephen Hunter, the thriller writer, likes Arkansas. 'Black Light' and others.

Vor 28 Tage
Am I Being Detained
Am I Being Detained

RANDOM FUN FACT: at 7:00 you can see a small part of the southern Mississippi that has a lower diversity of tree species than the rest of the map - this is due to the old and current meanders of the Mississippi that used to constantly create and fill flood plains! The tree species are less diverse because only certain ones could withstand constant bombardement from water! Just thought I’d share.

Vor 2 Monate
JH
JH

Aspen and Birch there?

Vor 2 Monate
Salvador Muro
Salvador Muro

That’s really neat thanks for that tidbit

Vor 2 Monate
Jack Carrillo
Jack Carrillo

As someone who has lived in the West, it's amazing to me to think that those in the East are just a short distance away from anything, meaning walk 20 minutes in any direction and you will find civilization.

Vor Monat
Jesse Leigh Brackstone
Jesse Leigh Brackstone

Our family lives in a wilderness area high in the beautiful Coastal Mountains in BC Canada, and I thank God🙏🏻 for that ‘line’! BTW, we aren’t lacking in rainfall here! Blessings! 🙏🏻 Jess.🌹

Vor 11 Tage
Michael Sechler
Michael Sechler

I live just east of this line, and crossed it today. I love the territory west of the line. I want to live there. I vacation there constantly. I love the wide open. I grew up where you could see the stars and watch the thunderstorms roll in from 100 miles away.

Vor 19 Tage
Maren Jones
Maren Jones

I live west of the Rockies. I remember the first time I saw unirigated crops in Illinois. I creeped me out so bad, and I couldn't figure out what was wrong for a couple weeks.

Vor Monat
Sean O
Sean O

I've driven across country 3 times on a motorcycle. The diversity in this country is truly something to experience. Would love to spend an entire year just driving around, having adventures and solving mysteries, like BJ and the Bear. :)

Vor 2 Monate
demurgetroid
demurgetroid

@Clayton Newberry India! Himalayas to Thar desert to tea plantations, hills, and giant coastline and beaches. Plus lions, tigers, elephants, camels, unreal birds etc

Vor Monat
Mark L
Mark L

Carbon footprint by existing

Vor Monat
Amritendu Rana
Amritendu Rana

@O Buddahee Far less footprint than gas

Vor Monat
HomeLess VanMore
HomeLess VanMore

@The real Khrayz definitely not lol

Vor Monat
The real Khrayz
The real Khrayz

@HomeLess VanMore this is amazing. That makes you the most interesting person on here 👏🏽👏🏽

Vor Monat
T A
T A

Thanks for sharing this education, Powell was a brilliant forefather as where our founders, I imagine how it would be now if only they did as he said. I lived in the northern rocky mountain west a third of my life and loved the beauty of it, and water is far more critical to everything western! Survival would be much harder then the wetter east if you are a prepper. I love both environments, I missed the hardwoods of the east but the beauty made up for it. If you have a bucket list, backpacking above the tree line needs to be added. The over night stars and milky-way is breath taking with shooting stars common, you can even see the satellites the first couple hours after dark. Bring a small flask of whisky, build a small fire, lay back and see what it was like in the days of the old west, no lights, no city noises, .....peace for the sole....

Vor Monat
Dave Messenheimer
Dave Messenheimer

A great video on topography and weather patterns. I do think your title doesn't address history enough though. The east is "older" as far as European settlements go. Thus it's not surprising that it would be more dense. People found something that worked, and didn't feel the need to keep traveling west. It's crazy that so many decided to stay when you look at how rocky the soil is in New England, but travel was so hard then they just made it work.

Vor 2 Tage
MSDesign ASMR
MSDesign ASMR

It's water.... There's not as much water to the left of the line

Vor Tag
Pete F.
Pete F.

Even though it's less green, I actually love the Mojave desert out West where I'm from. I also like the less people aspect of it too.

Vor Monat
Joshua Stein
Joshua Stein

As a high school US History teacher, I use the night-time satellite photo of the US to introduce western expansion and the transcontinental railroad. If you look closely, you can see strings of lights in the West, denoting the paths taken by railroads in the 19th century.

Vor 2 Monate
Scootaloo
Scootaloo

@Joshua Stein As a railfan, I find this interesting. I often use Google Maps to discover long abandoned railroad right of ways. You can often see paths of coal dust that still show up on the map's despite the fields having been plowed over many times by the farmers. Plus tree lines often follow former right of ways. 🙂

Vor 2 Monate
Joel Danker-Dake
Joel Danker-Dake

A lot less water west of the line I would think before watching the video.

Vor Tag
Hecker In the house!
Hecker In the house!

These type of settlements are also seen in China and Brazil, thanks to their tibetian plateau and the amazon. Australia also has a similar thing, they settle down near the coastlines bcz survival for humans in central aus is almost impossible

Vor 6 Tage
United French kingdom
United French kingdom

Wow that line splits my state in half (I live in Eastern Kansas) but now I realize how densely populated my state is. Oh and by the way thanks for the great video! I Really enjoyed, keep up the good work!

Vor Monat
Theia Moon
Theia Moon

Surprised you didn't use population centers like Yakima, Kennewik. Or Spokane as driness markers. That said, I have always viewed WA as a microcosm of the US's geography with mountains on either side and dry plains in between.

Vor Monat
Brisc
Brisc

as a person who lived in the west for basically the entirety of their lives, I never realized how empty it really was before this.

Vor Monat
Gmack
Gmack

Due to the dense electrical infrastructure east of the Mississippi, night skies just can't compete with central and midwest nights. As someone who has lived in the east all my life I never cease to be awed and amazed. sidebar: anyone know the music that accompanied the video?

Vor Monat
MondoBeno
MondoBeno

1. People settle near the coast or near the rivers. It's been that way since 5000 BC. Even more if the river is navigable. Until after the Civil War, who would want to live west of the Mississippi? 2. Americans needed lumber for everything. There were few forests on the Great Planes. 3. Most immigrants came from Europe, and the closes US entry was the east coast. 4. California's population grew very abruptly, in sudden spurts. The part that's farther from the coast isn't especially hospitable.

Vor Monat
Cratecruncher
Cratecruncher

Thanks for helping clear up the mystery of the missing west. I live in Austin, the front line you might say, in the draught war. Every year gets hotter and drier than the last.

Vor 11 Tage
DoodleDangWang
DoodleDangWang

I'd like to hear his VAAAASST inflection on something more mundane. "I walked into Starbucks and began to wait for an ENORMOUS length of time UNPRECEDENTED in ALL of modern human history. When I gazed at the MONUMENTAL menu variety I was ASTOUNDED at the plethora of choices with a STAGGERING 40 choices. Each item weighing in at a COLLASAL 2.5% of the TOTAL menu availability."

Vor 2 Monate
Alyssa Keene
Alyssa Keene

Lmao. I read this before watching the video and I can’t unhear it 😂

Vor 3 Tage
Patrick
Patrick

It's slightly annoying TBH. But it's still a good channel.

Vor 3 Tage
DatDudeVince
DatDudeVince

@hellaSwankky yeah it’s definitely a me thing. Most people around me don’t notice stuff like that and I always feel like a weirdo.

Vor 6 Tage
hellaSwankky
hellaSwankky

@DatDudeVince whoa. def thought i was the only one — being sensitive to those little....quirks, we'll call them. LOL it's so grating. i know it's a me-thing so i don't complain (out loud) but it does always have me pulling at my hair. 😖😣🥴

Vor 6 Tage
hellaSwankky
hellaSwankky

LMAO! 😂

Vor 6 Tage
Kristen and Sam
Kristen and Sam

Yes! Being travel nurses, it is so obvious the change from east to west. Have to say though, that is why the west is so beautiful like it is! All nature 😍

Vor Monat
Chad
Chad

As someone who lives in central Nebraska, I hope everyone stays east of that line. Nothing better than wide open spaces and not having to spend my life waiting in my car for traffic to move.

Vor Monat
allen lu
allen lu

Excellent video and explanation of the midline to separate the east and west!

Vor Monat
Aden Petersen
Aden Petersen

I submitted the goofy laugh and got more than I expected from it. Thank you for another excellent Wednesday Jimmy!

Vor Monat
vladspellbinder
vladspellbinder

I was an over the road truck driver for a while and I can verify the divide is obvious. I went from east to west coast and back again multiple times and you could always just tell when you were moving into that dead zone of no civilization, even without the "Last stop for next 100 miles" signs.

Vor 2 Monate
vladspellbinder
vladspellbinder

@tomservo You, and so many others commenting on this matter, are indeed taking what was said VERY out of context. I was talking about the parts BETWEEN civilization. There are long stretches' of road where the ONLY sign of civilization IS THE ROAD ITSELF. THESE are the areas I was talking about. Of course as soon as you get into cities or towns or even small HAMELTS there are signs of civilization! I was talking about the VAST stretches of land INBETWEEN civilization where you don't even have farmland; just desert or cliffs. I went through such areas on multiple trips back and forth between east coast and west coast, some of them were only an hour or so long while a few where two or more hours. I'm talking about the areas where the listed speed limit is 80/mph because there is NOTHING AROUND for people to need to go slow to avoid. I could only go 66/mph for most of my trips with a few a whopping 76/mph because of speed governors on my trucks so it took me much longer to get though them than the people going 90 or 100 miles-per-hour but even the speed demons would take a good while to get through those areas because they are just so large. I get the feeling you intentionally got upset about what I said because it should be OBVIOUS I was not talking about the cities and towns because they are "signs of civilization" in and of themselves and that I would mean the area *INBEWEEN* such places, the spots you have to go through to GET to civilization! Again, I was very specifically talking about the _very long stretches of nothing_ that are *between* the pockets of civilization. If you live in a small town, guess what THAT'S A SIGN of CIVILZATION! It doesn't matter to me how small your town is, you're a sign of civilization! There are still larges areas of the states that don't even have that. THAT is where I am talking about when I say "no signs of civilization" because there it NOTHING BUT NATURE THERE.

Vor Monat
tomservo
tomservo

Excuse me I take a bit of exception to the "NO CIVILIZATION" remark. I don't think you intended any insult by that comment, but I must speak my mind. We have plenty of civilization here. We live here because of the rural population. We like it. But to make statements like saying we're in a "dead zone" to me just reeks of urban coastal elitism. I don't think you intended that in your comment, but people like me DO live here (eastern Washington), we've got as much culture and civilization as we need, and in the 7 years I've lived here, we haven't once been in a water shortage.

Vor Monat
Rob W
Rob W

@vladspellbinder Really? If you can't understand that text I'm honestly surprised you can live in the world without assistance.

Vor Monat
Treec Trice
Treec Trice

@Ayo? white spots mean lights/cities/settled areas

Vor Monat
Ayo?
Ayo?

@koollee I think the white spots means it’s not as populated

Vor Monat
Christian Easter
Christian Easter

I am from Virginia and live in the blue ridge mountains. We have a relatively low population density, but it is nothing like the emptiness of the West. I have made about 10 vacation trips to West. I think it is very beautiful place with many fantastic geologic features, but I wouldn't live there. I love the rolling green mountains of Virginia. We have a low enough population to be able to get away from everyone if you want or go to see a lot of people if you need to. 😀

Vor 5 Tage
Christian Easter
Christian Easter

Thousands of years ago desert extended almost the Mississippi river. Virtually all of states like Kansas and Nebraska was total desert. If yo dig down through the fertile soil left behind by the glaciers in east of the 98 parallel, there are huge sand deposits.

Vor 5 Tage
RooFx
RooFx

I had seen every state West of the Mississippi by the time I was 19 or so. Once I went East I vowed never to go East of the Mississippi again. Why some of us retired in an area of 100k hectares and only 6100 people at 8000' might be a fair topic, too. That is an area about 4x the size of greater Indianapolis. No twisters? No that is just a bonus. No hurricanes? No that is just another bonus. Look at any dark sky map and you'll know exactly why.

Vor Monat
red
red

It’s hard to grasp the luxury eastern USA lives in having been in the west for just over half my life now with limited water and long distances between suburban urban areas. Blows my mind

Vor Monat
Austin Hannemann
Austin Hannemann

I once drove from Provo UT to Austin TX and can confirm there are very few towns in between and TONS of desert, crazy that Phoenix and Las Vegas exist in this desert

Vor 2 Monate
bob boscarato
bob boscarato

I'm sure gambling and casinos had something to do with Las Vegas; I don't know about Phoenix!

Vor Monat
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones

@Timothy Keith Read up on how bad his co. is instead of going off the hype. He's like Trump in selfishness.

Vor 2 Monate
BPD
BPD

@no debt If China can do it we surely can. People doubt China, but pictures from space over several decades dont lie.

Vor 2 Monate
no debt
no debt

@BPD The idea has been talked about. Diverting only 5% of the Mississippi River, it would only take 630 days to fill both Lake Mead and Lake Powell.

Vor 2 Monate
Timothy Keith
Timothy Keith

@allinaday A water tunnel is about as impractical as a colony on Mars, but parts of the west are at risk of becoming pretty barren of green. I think Salt Lake City is the most at risk. No project could justify bringing water from the east to the west because desalination, as relatively costly as it is, would be much lower cost than a network of canals/tunnels. A guide for off-grid living says you can survive with rainwater collection on as little as 1 gallon per day per person. That would only be 120 gallons for a household of four in California. Where I live, the household average water consumption is 7,000 gallons a month. New irrigation tech is being adopted in the west which greatly reduces water consumption. That means higher food prices, but there should be adequate water in the west. Not that CA persons would actually be expected to only use 1 gallon per day! Industry and agriculture are the biggest users of water. East of the Mississippi river relatively little agriculture is currently irrigated, but it could be done for productivity increases.

Vor 2 Monate
Bran R
Bran R

I grew up in the PNW. Driving 3 hours for a vacation and 12 hours to visit grandma seemed pretty normal. Living 2 miles from the edge of civilization with absolutely nothing but vast swathes of trees and rivers on all sides. Then I went to college and met people from the East Coast.

Vor Monat
Jane Dough
Jane Dough

Sorry 😢

Vor Monat
B-zad
B-zad

I live in Utah (raised in new york) and i can tell you that the abundance of open space out here is f*cking magical. We camp, hike, bike, drive wherever we want and there are never any crowds (by east coast standards).

Vor Monat
LSAT Anonymous
LSAT Anonymous

I am curious to see an overlay of the Louisiana Purchase over this map. France/Spain historically controlled this enormous territory, which only included a sliver of the modern day state of Louisiana, and reached all the way into southern Canada, prior to its controversial (some say unconstitutional) acquisition by the U.S.

Vor Monat
Proudi
Proudi

It's crazy to me that when showing the rocky mountains that little blob in the diagram is nearly the same size in length as the entire US Rocky Mountain range but yet in the diagram looks so much smaller.

Vor Monat
PotatoIsMe
PotatoIsMe

The narator: most powerfull nation in humam history.. Guess ??

Vor 8 Stunden
LisaLovesAnimals
LisaLovesAnimals

Interesting. Actually thought he was going to make the observation that both the Sahara and the western part of mostly uninhabited America were once vast oceans. The ocean 100 million years ago that covered those States was called the Western interior seaway.

Vor Monat
rico567
rico567

Setting aside the other reasons (for I have no intention to watch a 21 min. video), it’s interesting how close the 80/20 line shown in the thumbnail is to the boundary between over/under 20 inches of annual rainfall….

Vor Monat
kai
kai

took a flight from LAX to omaha one time. i was sitting at a window seat. as soon as the plane took off from LA its desert, followed by even more desert, canyons, desert, mountain ranges, then farmland for the remaining half(?) of the 3 hour flight. basically i didn't see any signs of civilization (aside from the farmers that would be on the ground but too small to see) on that particular route from LA all the way to omaha

Vor Monat
Sonia’s Way
Sonia’s Way

As someone who’s never been to America, I find this really interesting

Vor 2 Monate
demurgetroid
demurgetroid

@Dan Rhone and miss all of Europe's culture and architecture and sheer beauty

Vor Monat
Kay Dunton
Kay Dunton

Many cities are high crime on the East coast. And no free health care.

Vor Monat
Slade Wilson
Slade Wilson

I guess so. This is largely largely down to history. The Western USA never really became populated till around the beginning of the 20th Century. The Wild West lasted for a long time. The East Coast was were the United States was founded.

Vor 2 Monate
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones

@King of the Underhill Native Texans have an accent.

Vor 2 Monate
Treetop Jones
Treetop Jones

@Jay Ca. central coast is beautiful.

Vor 2 Monate
Kandaman
Kandaman

What a great video presentation. I clicked the link out of curiosity but ended up learning something new about the topographical map of The United States. I was particularly impressed by the different mountain ranges that make up parts of the U.S. and how these mountain ranges affect the climate of various regions. It was a very educational video and thanks for putting this together! Folks...we need to care for our environment because it's our home. Climate Change is real!!!

Vor Monat
strawberryfields
strawberryfields

Climate change IS real and has been happening for thousands of years. Very normal. ♡

Vor Monat
Eamon Kelly Graves
Eamon Kelly Graves

Who here is from that sparse 4.5%? I grew up in Santa Fe NM, an hr from the nearest big city, and I took yearly 14hr drives across that meridian to visit my grandparents in Houston. It really was environmental and lifestyle culture shock moving to Boston for college!

Vor Monat
Mike Kerwin
Mike Kerwin

Great Video! As someone who has lived in the west and east, I always wondered why the east seemed more filled with different trees and vegetation and why the west is basically tumbleweeds, wheat and pine trees.

Vor Monat
Emilie Holtmeier
Emilie Holtmeier

Yep

Vor Monat
Thorsten Weimar
Thorsten Weimar

Beyond the Hundredth Meridian: John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West, that book says it all. John Wesley Powell knew about the whole topic of the arid west in the 19th century, but no one was listening. Many books followed like “Cadillac Desert” by Marc Reisner. Anyway, the current status of the Colorado River and it’s former mighty water reservoirs are already harbingers for things to come.

Vor Monat
Lagdarr
Lagdarr

I thought the name ‘John Wesley Powell’ sounded familiar to me, turns out he taught at my alma mater! (Illinois Wesleyan University) IWU’s annual student research conference that I presented at is also named after him! Really cool to see the work that made him famous in the first place!

Vor 2 Monate
King Ace
King Ace

Cool

Vor 2 Monate
Lagdarr
Lagdarr

@FlyingDwarfman I think Illinois Wesleyan, like Wesleyan University, is named after John Wesley. It is a neat coincidence though :D Edit: It is only after reading this again that I realized John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist church, has the same name of John Wesley Powell, which makes me believe John Wesley Powell was named after him too. What a weird coincidence!

Vor 2 Monate
FlyingDwarfman
FlyingDwarfman

Hmm... It could be random coincidence, but could the university (Illinois ...WESLEYan... University) be named for him and/ or family of John Wesley Powell?

Vor 2 Monate
asdfghjkl
asdfghjkl

I first heard of him watching this video. He was brilliant and his advice should have been followed. State lines should have been drawn based on the availability of water instead of doing something as stupid as drawing straight lines through the landscape.

Vor 2 Monate
I. E. B.
I. E. B.

I’m from the Grand Canyon and John Wesley Powell is an icon there. First to navigate through it. Powell point on the west rim and Lake Powell on the east.

Vor 2 Monate
deb v
deb v

I live in RI. Go 10 miles in any direction and you're likely in another city. Going to a restaurant that's more than 10 miles away is reserved for a special occasion. We struggle to keep any land from being developed. How nice that in some areas of this country there are vast open spaces not touched by people.

Vor 21 Tag
Audrey Ankunding
Audrey Ankunding

Zane: "Fear is the best emotion." Me: "Zane is secretly a Sinestro Corps warrior."

Vor 13 Tage
IndigenousAmericanTrucker
IndigenousAmericanTrucker

Shit as a trucker I've noticed this line myself. I always use interstate 35 to describe this line although it may surpass that highway in the northern parts but no further then interstate 25. Nevertheless interstate 35 is more closer to correct for this line. Human life past interstate 35 gets very thin regardless where you hit it from in its North and South direction. The other line in my opinion would be the mountains that travel north and south in California up to Washington where most humans live west of. Or if one wants to use an interstate for the line then interstate 15 would be the closest although it doesnt travel due north and south but instead Southwest to Northeast from Cali to Utah. Nevertheless it couldnt be used as an accurate depiction of this line which is why i use the mountains. As a trucker this has always been obvious to me and I've only been driving a little over 10 years.

Vor Monat
Brent Owen
Brent Owen

I love the west cost I recently moved to San Antonio and I can’t see my self moving anymore east. Something about the other side of that line that draws me there. I’m planing on moving to Reno after school. I miss the wide open and the mountains.

Vor Monat
Kosm _
Kosm _

Something you forgot to mention is this is the reason there's so many more tornadoes in America on this line than anywhere else in the world. It's very unique to severe supercell thunderstorms because drylines happen here all the time

Vor 2 Monate
KM
KM

I grew up in OKC so literally right in the middle of tornado ally. In college I worked w/ someone from S. Dakota and there was a tornado in our area and he thought we’d be just fine because we were in a brick building!😂 I was like…. ok. I’ll be in this closet covering my head and you just stand out there!😂

Vor 2 Monate
Julian Paolo Dayag
Julian Paolo Dayag

@Amy M. Clark uhm but you're wrong... we don't call Tornadoes as Cyclones. We always refer Tornadoes as Tornadoes and they're very different than to what we refer to as Cyclones/Depression/Storm/Typhoon/Hurricane. I'm from one of the countries you've mentioned and there's an actual difference to these terms. When the news reports a Tornado, they literally mean DRY spinning mass of wind and they're usually small that can lift up roofs and whatever, but when the news reports starts to say Storm/Cyclone/Typhoon/Hurricane we know that this one will be very WET and covers a very large area.

Vor 2 Monate
number nine
number nine

@Cassidy The Cat lol I live the midsouth we have crazy weather triggering tornados. Luckily I've never seen one. I've seen the damage, it looks similar to a war zone. There is very little if any warning and no where to hide.

Vor 2 Monate
Cassidy The Cat
Cassidy The Cat

I'm from central Texas, and no words can't describe how much I want to see a tornado. I mean I am thankful that I haven't been through one, but at the same time its like they look so cool and interesting. In my defense, I live in the Edward's Plateau region so I hardly get any kind of weather except for some thunderstorms, so I would just like a change every now and then

Vor 2 Monate
number nine
number nine

@Daniel V I recently Google it bc id not heard of any cat 4 tornados wiping out cities. Come to find out there aren't but a few tornados elsewhere in the world. Living in the deep south hearing tornado sirens is about as common as hearing a fire truck.

Vor 2 Monate
apealeal
apealeal

Man this was one of the best videos I've seen on youtube in a really long time.

Vor Monat
frank rodrigues
frank rodrigues

You pretty much just talked me out of my drive from Toronto to LA. I knew the west was more sparsely populated but had no concept that it was that desolate. Excellent video. Truly eye-opening .

Vor Monat
Alexrsulzbach
Alexrsulzbach

I mean you should probably still go on it. The expansive nature and beauty of western US is so beautiful and breathtaking.

Vor 6 Tage
frank sieckmann
frank sieckmann

What? Because You can’t get to a McDonald’s in five minutes? 😂

Vor Monat
George Plimpton
George Plimpton

We used to drive from California to Waterloo when our son attended university there. I encourage you to make the drive to LA. It's a wonderful, fun experience. We've driven both a truck and a hybrid and taken different routes.

Vor Monat

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