The 4 things it takes to be an expert

  • Am Vor 18 Tage

    VeritasiumVeritasium

    Which experts have real expertise? This video is sponsored by Brilliant. The first 200 people to sign up via brilliant.org/veritasium get 20% off a yearly subscription.

    Thanks to www.chess24.com/ and Chessable for the clip of Magnus.

    ▀▀▀
    Chase, W. G., & Simon, H. A. (1973). Perception in chess. Cognitive psychology, 4(1), 55-81. - ve42.co/chess1

    Calderwood, R., Klein, G. A., & Crandall, B. W. (1988). Time pressure, skill, and move quality in chess. The American Journal of Psychology, 481-493. - ve42.co/chess2

    Hogarth, R. M., Lejarraga, T., & Soyer, E. (2015). The two settings of kind and wicked learning environments. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 24(5), 379-385. - ve42.co/Hogarth

    Ægisdóttir, S., White, M. J., Spengler, P. M., Maugherman, A. S., Anderson, L. A., Cook, R. S., ... & Rush, J. D. (2006). The meta-analysis of clinical judgment project: Fifty-six years of accumulated research on clinical versus statistical prediction. The Counseling Psychologist, 34(3), 341-382. - ve42.co/anderson1

    Ericsson, K. A. (2015). Acquisition and maintenance of medical expertise: a perspective from the expert-performance approach with deliberate practice. Academic Medicine, 90(11), 1471-1486. - ve42.co/anderson2

    Goldberg, S. B., Rousmaniere, T., Miller, S. D., Whipple, J., Nielsen, S. L., Hoyt, W. T., & Wampold, B. E. (2016). Do psychotherapists improve with time and experience? A longitudinal analysis of outcomes in a clinical setting. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 63(1), 1. - ve42.co/goldberg1

    Ericsson, K. A., Krampe, R. T., & Tesch-Römer, C. (1993). The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance. Psychological Review, 100(3), 363. - ve42.co/anderson3

    Egan, D. E., & Schwartz, B. J. (1979). Chunking in recall of symbolic drawings. Memory & Cognition, 7(2), 149-158. - ve42.co/chunking1

    Tetlock, P. E. (2017). Expert political judgment. In Expert Political Judgment. Princeton University Press. - ve42.co/Tetlock

    Melton, R. S. (1952). A comparison of clinical and actuarial methods of prediction with an assessment of the relative accuracy of different clinicians. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Minnesota.

    Meehl, E. P. (1954). Clinical versus Statistical Prediction: A Theoretical Analysis and a Review of the Evidence. University of Minnesota Press. - ve42.co/Meehl1954

    Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking, fast and slow. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. - ve42.co/Kahneman

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    Written by Derek Muller and Petr Lebedev
    Animation by Ivy Tello and Fabio Albertelli
    Filmed by Derek Muller and Raquel Nuno
    Additional video/photos supplied by Getty Images
    Music from Epidemic Sound ( ve42.co/music )
    Produced by Derek Muller, Petr Lebedev, and Emily Zhang

Chess.com
Chess.com

Wow, this was incredibly insightful!

Vor 16 Tage
Tonda .Bartoš
Tonda .Bartoš

Danny is here.

Vor 13 Stunden
David Emmanuel
David Emmanuel

Woah

Vor 2 Tage
Clown SS Schwab
Clown SS Schwab

BUFFET is connected to the FED. the FED. A PRIVATE BANK HAS THE MONOPOLY OF MONEY CREATION AND HAS THE MARKETS RIGGED. BUFFET KNOWS WHAT FED IS DOING. so his example was not correct.

Vor 2 Tage
Kaladin
Kaladin

@Romer Rosales-Hasek It looked like a jump cut. The board was in a different position when they zoomed back out.

Vor 4 Tage
John Musa
John Musa

Bro in finding hacker everywhere pls stop them in new and need help.

Vor 7 Tage
Lucas Carman
Lucas Carman

Getting comfortable is the part that always kills me. I learn very quickly but once I get something down fairly well, I stop challenging myself and just rest on that success.

Vor 6 Tage
ᴡʜᴀᴛsᴀᴘᴘ+④④⑦⑨⑤⓪④④⑥⑦③⑥
ᴡʜᴀᴛsᴀᴘᴘ+④④⑦⑨⑤⓪④④⑥⑦③⑥

⤴️⤴️ tell thompson to share and show you something new profitable huge in business.

Vor Stunde
Abrar Tanim
Abrar Tanim

this is literally me

Vor 11 Stunden
Daniss
Daniss

@Ynemey l

Vor 23 Stunden
Ynemey
Ynemey

Comfort level doesn't matter at all. Deliberate practice does.

Vor Tag
Charles Parr
Charles Parr

I think thats actually a positive, i would think that in almost any situation, having a good command of many skills and subjects, and being able to move on to the next thing fairly often would have much greater utility. First, because in most things experts are not that much more useful than the merely competent. If you spend ten times the resources and time to become twice as good, then that only matters much in fairly specific tasks. secondly, what happens if your area of expertise either beomes irrelevant or you are unable to use that expertise for some other reason? Imagine being the star running back through high school and college, certain to be drafted. Since the age of 8 that guy has devoted unbeleivable time and effort, got a scholarship that was of necessity a basketweaving degree (not all but most football players do not get useful degrees or even finish them) and so lost that opportunity for education, and suffers a career ending injury in the second last game of a college season. All that expert knowledge all that training just became useless, at best they might have some crossover skills, and depending on the expertise there might be few of those. Perhaps your own 'weakness'n is a strength?

Vor 2 Tage
Jessica Tatum
Jessica Tatum

100% this is how I was trained to be a ballet dancer and I didn't even recognize it. We do the same movements in slightly varying patterns every single day in a structured class, and for actual repertoire we repeat the EXACT same movements over and over, with a teacher or coach telling you what to improve after each attempt. As you get stronger, you do more and more challenging combinations of movement with increased complexity and strength requirements, and you spend more time reviewing and conditioning on your own time. Eventually you get really good at learning and doing choreography in certain styles/from certain choreographers because you start to recognize the patterns of movement they tend to employ.

Vor 8 Tage
Lucky the Lemur
Lucky the Lemur

Same with guitar, you start with basic chords and scales and than over time overlap them with slightly more complicated things. Think about how all the universe began with Hydrogen, and that formed Helium and on and on to more extreme complexity (sort of). Or how we learned a language when we were infants, one of the most complex things alot of people ever learn and they learned it as an infant. The entire complexity of the universe is small basic things stack upon other small basic things to gain what in evolutionary biology is called 'emergent properties', new functions that can only be gained through the development of a system of multiple individual components that were not capable of those functions with the individual components alone.

Vor 8 Stunden
little1133
little1133

@Space and Time take that with a grain of salt though, because I’m far from a teacher, it’s only my second year on pointe.

Vor 2 Tage
little1133
little1133

@Space and Time I would say if you’re trying to learn ballet, get lessons at a studio.

Vor 2 Tage
extremely speedy yeets
extremely speedy yeets

Same for learning piano.

Vor 3 Tage
Space and Time
Space and Time

@xio kousa are ye a ballet teacher? If so, can I ask ye sth: are the moves and choreographies of men and women the same in ballet? We do have playlists of dance lessons in the channel of Maria Khreva and North Pacific Ballet channel, but I dunno if I should learn and apply those as a male? Because what I see is there are women learning there.... Thanx .... Best.. .

Vor 3 Tage
You can't spell American Dream without Eric Andre
You can't spell American Dream without Eric Andre

As a trained physicist this was really interesting. I have not the best memory recall, some guys know the answer to a problem they did years ago, but I always have a „gut feeling“ how the equations will emerge and I can see a strong pattern in equations, even looking at it for a small amount of time is often enough to restructure the stuff in my head - even when not perfect, it’s a good cope for a usually bad memory recall

Vor 8 Tage
Mick Bingo
Mick Bingo

A physicist LOL. What do you do for anyone?

Vor 7 Stunden
John Smith
John Smith

On the other side of the coin, I encountered so many physics graduate students who have really limited/narrow abilities to actually reason out a problem. They often try to recall what they were taught instead of simply using logic to solve problems. They are very much confined into thinking a very particular way. (If you are in the field, you probably know what I mean.) This is a horrible practice, and it is alarming that academia is filled with people like that. Drones who will basically never think outside of the box.

Vor Tag
Jambri
Jambri

Love your response!

Vor 2 Tage
Phoomph Gaming
Phoomph Gaming

I’m incredibly similar, not with mathematics but reading. I have an almost photographic recall, as long as the verbiage is similar. For example, I will always score a 100 on true or false question bc the question itself will jog the memory, however a short answer question where there’s abject thought needed I can have a hard time grasping the required adjacent memories…. If that makes sense

Vor 2 Tage
You can't spell American Dream without Eric Andre
You can't spell American Dream without Eric Andre

@prometheusrex1 Ahahahh fair, I have a masters rn

Vor 2 Tage
CutiePi
CutiePi

After having read Moonwalking with Einstein, Fooled by Randomness, Sapiens and Thinking fast and slow. This really felt like a condensed version of parts of each book combined. Very good video, cheers !

Vor 9 Tage
Ivan B
Ivan B

Read "Talent is overrated"

Vor 15 Stunden
Luke Puplett
Luke Puplett

@cautare pvp It does take time, but it's time that must be lived anyway. My point isn't that one should not become great at something, but that one should enter into the journey understanding the system and whether other people will be the main beneficiaries of your sacrifice.

Vor Tag
cautare pvp
cautare pvp

@Luke Puplett damn such a good comment. But its not that simple, it takes soo much time to be great at something

Vor Tag
Luke Puplett
Luke Puplett

​@XP Private There are a faults in this analysis. - As you become better at something, your reach may become very broad. For example, you may become a leader in coronavirus research. - A coronavirus expert making a mistake could cause a pandemic. - How much do firefighters, miners, or Bangladeshi's dismantling ships, make? - How much does Derek make from YouTube and what's the impact when he messes up? - What if author JK Rowling's next book is bad? - If you rank the world's wealthiest people by net worth and then by risk/impact of their actions, does the order change much? - If you have an idea and start a business and get investors, you can pay yourself a salary and hire experts. This is common with non-technical tech company start-ups. If it fails, you have two options a) try again, in which case you're more investable because you have experience of what not to do b) get a well paid job. There's no risk here. But consider that the average business is small and in your local town. The owner's mistake might temporarily impact a dozen employees and several hundred customers, and yet they will drive the Bentley, own a couple of Patek Phillip watches and live in a big house, because they realised what I described above and went about making it happen. The risk argument simply doesn't stand up to scrutiny. Neither being an expert nor risk accounts for wealth. Owning the means of production, whether you have a team of people making desks, or fixing people's teeth, or own your own written words (even if you got an expert ghost writer to write them), is the key. Here's a final one: look up how much song writers get paid, vs. the people that sing them, and the shareholders of the record company. What's the pattern? The shareholders get most of the money, the expert songwriter gets $52,000 a year, on average, across all the songs they write. Teaching kids how to become an expert without teaching them who actually earns the lion's share of the money their expertise generates under our capitalist system, is a disservice. Some people discover this at work. They look around, they see how the business operates, they think, why am I earning x when I could run a business like this and pay myself y. And they start their own thing. They realise the game, and they realise it has nothing to do with expertise.

Vor Tag
XP Private
XP Private

@Luke Puplett To become an expert in anything you have to focus on a skill. As you become better at something the niche that can appreciate your skill becomes smaller and smaller. Therefore your reach will become smaller and smaller the better you get and that is normal. I don't see that as a problem at all, because money should be directly correlated to RISK. An expert making an mistake will only affect an small number of people. A business owner making a mistake will impact maybe millions of people. Its because the difference in risk that there is a difference in compensation.

Vor 2 Tage
AlienScientist
AlienScientist

04:56 1. Repeated Attempts with feedback 06:52 2. Valid Environment 11:23 3. Timely Feedback 13:46 4. Don't get too comfortable

Vor 11 Tage
Jaylen Lenear
Jaylen Lenear

Thank you so much. What's your cashapp I'll donate something because I really get sick of videos that don't have time stamps

Vor 2 Tage
VU bioinformatics
VU bioinformatics

@Beth Garma I'd say it is an environment in which the feedback you get is meaningful. The roulette table is a counter-example, because the responses (win/lose) are random. Practicing penalties is a valid environment, because the responses (hit/miss) tell you if your shot was good.

Vor 6 Tage
Péter Szilvási
Péter Szilvási

@Peace for All Good rephrasing. I believe that the last point would be better as "and do not afraid to go outside of your comfort zone".

Vor 7 Tage
Sree Shankar Lal
Sree Shankar Lal

valid environment is something in which there are limited number of variables. This makes it predictable.

Vor 7 Tage
William BO
William BO

@U Know What I Mean its like a racing event. if you race with faster people you'll do what =ever it takes and improve to beat them next time. if you race by yourself or with slow people

Vor 7 Tage
Zola 🔥F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🔥
Zola 🔥F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🔥

4:54 - many repeated attempts with feedback 6:46 - a valid (predictable) environment 11:20 - timely feedback 13:50 - don't get too comfortable

Vor 4 Tage
NotAbig DealThough
NotAbig DealThough

@roy_for_real he meant it was a bot that stole the timestamps 😂

Vor 2 Stunden
Autumn
Autumn

Thanks :D

Vor 10 Stunden
AlishaAnimations *
AlishaAnimations *

Explain yourself wayumean when you say: “use-less”

Vor 16 Stunden
Shree Hari Prasad
Shree Hari Prasad

This video is thousand times more helpful than a thousand self-help motivational videos here on YouTube,,, thanks 🙏

Vor 8 Tage
cuto mcoi
cuto mcoi

I recently had a MASSIVE argument with my university because they repeatedly did not provide any feedback to essays or exams. Just a mark and that's it. I backed my

Vor Tag
Lars Stenstrup Bruntse
Lars Stenstrup Bruntse

Personally I learned this lesson with driving. I consider myself a great driver with 15 years on the road, but when i started racing 100mph karts 3 years ago i quickly realised that the 15 years of comfy driving was absolutely worthless in terms of racing near the limits. I am getting my ass kicked by teenagers who have never driven a car. After 3 years of karting myself i can proudly say that im still not even close to catching up to them. They have pushed the limits for years despite their age. In terms og driving, lets face it, they are the experts.

Vor 9 Tage
Amoeba
Amoeba

@aaa aaa Oh !! lol

Vor 2 Tage
mikkel l
mikkel l

True. I'm great at driving fast on the street, but rly ain't that good driving the speed limit or below.

Vor 3 Tage
aaa aaa
aaa aaa

@Amoeba Lars is a male name.

Vor 3 Tage
Amoeba
Amoeba

@Tiara Roxeanne she is not he

Vor 3 Tage
Tiara Roxeanne
Tiara Roxeanne

Take a big heart to admit that. Hats off to you, Sir.

Vor 4 Tage
Clara -My New Private vidoe
Clara -My New Private vidoe

I used to play tournament chess in HS, learned tennis as an adult and played in USTA leagues, learned a few instruments and played in a few bands. The number one fail I saw of people along the same journeys as I while learning new things is their comfort level. Everyone has a rough time learning but some would gain a little competence and rest on those tiny laurels - and not get more competent. It seemed like people would find the laurels that fit their egos and then they stopped. They didn't go until they exhausted their abilities. Someone/something didn't say stop. They stopped themselves.

Vor 7 Tage
Lionel Zwiers
Lionel Zwiers

Thanks a lot! I see this very much when people (or myself) learn a new language and are to shy to talk. How you formulate it, made me think of reflect on my own activities. Thank for the insight 🌟

Vor 19 Stunden
Ynemey
Ynemey

I don't see where comfort has anything to do with ambition.

Vor Tag
unitewithchrist
unitewithchrist

It’s not always due to lack of effort or ambition. life situations prevent people from going further. Major life changes can shift priorities in a persons life leading them to different habits and new experiences outside of one particular interest.

Vor Tag
AlanKey86
AlanKey86

This is a very timely video for the start of a new college term in September - I'll definitely be showing this to my new students!

Vor 16 Tage
Jayne
Jayne

@Kim-André Johansen I am a teacher/lecturer in biz intelligence with roughly 30.000 hrs experience. I would not never ever show that (amazing) video my students. Getting comfortable exploring new knowledge is formost an emotional and not so much a cognitive problem. Working outside your comfort zone means learning. The main question is: What are your coping strategies to deal with slow or even missing success? ... ...

Vor 7 Tage
TRSPanda21
TRSPanda21

Jesus loves us all that's why he died for our sins

Vor 10 Tage
Captain Zork
Captain Zork

More important would probably to understand how to study most effectively, according to cognitive psychology. If you want a source, I can share if you'd like

Vor 14 Tage
Richard Smith
Richard Smith

Ironically finding my favorite pianist on an expert video hey @AlanKey86

Vor 14 Tage
InGameLevi
InGameLevi

@giveussomevodka Go work at a casino buffet. Restaurants are challenging and casinos usually give you free food (I've been working at one for 4 years now. Started at buffet, transferred to employee dining room after 2 years because of scheduling and my boss not being willing to make necessary changes. Employee dining room is also a little more lax. I'd choose it over any typical restaurant job. I get to restock a buffet-style line and cook free burgers while making $18 minus taxes and deductions every hour). The insurance is also like none I've ever had before. My copay at the doc is only $20. Medications: Usually just $5.

Vor 14 Tage
Johnny Valentine
Johnny Valentine

I couldn't justly articulate the relief emotionally, intellectually and spiritually this video has provided. Very happy you're continuing to follow the philosophical thread of chunking.

Vor 3 Tage
UZ Student
UZ Student

Great courses: outsmart yourself! 😁

Vor 4 Tage
Alve Svarén
Alve Svarén

As a software developer, I really feel that I get better at solving problems using my intuition, and all the 4 concepts you listed in this video matches my experience perfectly. Great video!

Vor 3 Tage
Someone McMystery
Someone McMystery

I've had years of formal classical music training, work in a competitive STEM field, basically a lot of experience with deliberate practice. It's funny though, the one skill that emphasized what this video was about more than anything else was butterfly knife flipping. The blade cuts you if you mess up, everything depends on how your fingers move and how you judge inertia, tricks are clearly defined and compartmentalizable, and if you don't learn new tricks, you are only stuck with the specific ones you know. It literally teaches you how to practice

Vor 8 Tage
Lucky the Lemur
Lucky the Lemur

As the old joke goes: Music theory teacher: "at least it's not rocket science" Rocket science professor: "at least it's not music theory"

Vor 8 Stunden
Martin Cattell
Martin Cattell

I'm having similar thoughts with reference to skateboarding. Getting it wrong can be catastrophic so you find ways of progressing and practising intelligently. Or you get hurt which teaches you to get better or quit, ie choose comfort. I think my biggest failing in all things is getting too comfortable. Failure is deeply painful for me. But so is doing nothing.

Vor 7 Tage
Xavier
Xavier

I LOVE how Derek just absolutely destroyed film school experts in the smoothest way possible.

Vor 15 Tage
Curie
Curie

Look who is here

Vor 14 Tage
David
David

Twitter dude

Vor 14 Tage
Rajat Shinde
Rajat Shinde

Xavier in the chat

Vor 14 Tage
Hexanitrobenzene
Hexanitrobenzene

@peter sgouros That I didn't know...🙃

Vor 15 Tage
peter sgouros
peter sgouros

@Hexanitrobenzene sounds like the story of hitler being a failed artist.

Vor 15 Tage
Zareth Wilson
Zareth Wilson

My key takeaway from this video, being an incredibly cynical and defensive person, is how to positively identify good experts. I've been calling people on their BS my whole life, but it's important not to fall into the trap of thinking literally everyone is always full of crap. It would be easy to watch this video and start scorning all "experts" and going down a rabbit hole of trusting no one, failing to recognize critically important information given by real, benevolent experts. Could be disastrous. We've seen it play out on a massive scale a lot recently.

Vor 7 Tage
dingle’s world
dingle’s world

Being TOO skeptical of others' knowledge and abilities has certainly set an..."unfavorable" precedent lmao.

Vor 8 Stunden
rachelle2227
rachelle2227

I am a paper quilling artist that sells my work/done it semi professionally for a few years. It was interesting watching this, thinking about how this applies to art! I hadn’t really started experimenting and trying harder until I started doing it professionally (and before , a lot of the times I was a kid/teenager/busy college student). Showing my work publicly and looking at other artists, in my own niche and outside it, has really improved my designs/skill. Everything in this video was so true! What’s fun about being an artist is, I don’t think there really is a cieling, there’s always a new look/idea/ or technique you can explore with art.

Vor 9 Tage
Shauka Hodan
Shauka Hodan

I recently had a MASSIVE argument with my university because they repeatedly did not provide any feedback to essays or exams. Just a mark and that's it. I backed my

Vor 5 Tage
bofooit gojo
bofooit gojo

Wow. You actually quantified the statement “those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it”

Vor 4 Tage
A J
A J

"Only after a refresher course could the (20-years experience) doctors accurately diagnose (rare) diseases" better than recent med-school graduates.

Vor 4 Tage
BUDA
BUDA

The pattern recognition became very clear to me when I learned Morse code. The human brain takes 50 milliseconds to process and understand a sound. People regularly send and receive Morse code at 30 words per minute, which puts the dit character and the gap between all characters at 40 milliseconds. So you literally have to process sounds faster than the brain can recognize them. Over time you start to hear whole words in the code rather than individual letters, but you still have to decode call signs character by character. You basically cache the sounds in your brain without processing them, and once the whole set of characters passes, your brain is able to turn it into an idea and add it to the stack of previous ideas while your ears are already caching the next set of characters.

Vor 16 Tage
Nicole
Nicole

🤯

Vor 25 Minuten
Klinzッ
Klinzッ

You to smart

Vor 34 Minuten
shane wright
shane wright

I feel like it's similar to reading writing. We don't look at each letter at a time to see what the word says. Instead we read words as the whole thing, we recognise how letters sit with each other and what phrases they make instead of piecing each letter together.

Vor 14 Stunden
Moon Knight
Moon Knight

i feel that whilst i was learning english, as i further progressed, the same thing happened, i wasn't going back and forth between sounds,like A in english - > decode noise to native language -> recode response from native language to english -> repeat audibly in english phonetic code.The middle process got cut out, as if an entire english file with little fonetic caches were made solely to make the process faster and more systematic, funnily enough it starts meshing with native language if you're not careful enough, like the subconscious *REALLY* likes to make things as automated as possible, even if it means to accidentally join important pathways that the slow side of the brain understand that optimal =/= socially correct,but the subconscious doesn't. I find it super cool but rarely get to share this lil insight.

Vor Tag
cautare pvp
cautare pvp

Hmm so learning Morse code is good?

Vor Tag
L M N O P
L M N O P

Great video! Going back to the stocks example, I think funnily enough, this video kind of explains why most people fail in the markets. They haven't developed a rules based strategy that they have spent hours upon hours, gaining feedback on how it works and its effectiveness in the markets, and when it comes time for execution, instead of sticking to the strategy (like the mouse) they tend to play around or "wing it" and end up performing way worse than they would have otherwise. Also with trading/investing, there are plenty of other factors like limited resources (money and time) that people don't have much to spend, which is not enough for them to gain timely feedback or the knowledge necessary to even get good at a strategy and understand the market they wish to invest/trade in. The markets are also unpredictable/volatile at certain times of the day or when certain news events take place which may make it harder to gather data (since it's another factor to consider). That's why the failure rate is so high. So if a retail trader/investor wants to improve their chances in the market, they should perform hours of mock executions (over the course of months) and preferably have a mentor in the field with years of experience so that they can learn from their mistakes before ever deciding to use live funds. This isn't financial advice though, it's but an observation.

Vor 6 Tage
zyoface
zyoface

To steal from my high school teacher, "practice does not make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." This also seems to be an apt checklist for composing a well performing machine learning agent (or at least are 4 very relevant circumstances to consider). Interesting as always, thank you!

Vor 8 Tage
You pick the wrong guy fool
You pick the wrong guy fool

Nice 👍

Vor 15 Stunden
Mark Cotgrove
Mark Cotgrove

Very well explained 🙌and also a great, if subtle, rebuttal of the 10,000 hrs myth. The one thing I would say is that you ignore the genetic component to some of these 'experts', e.g. you show a clip of Bolt winning a 100m race. In this case, and some others that you cite, a genetic predisposition is necessary to be a high achiever; I don't care how much a 'normal' person trains in the right way they will never be able to run 100m in less than 10s. For clarity, I'm not saying that genetic traits are necessarily the most important factor, I'm simply saying that in some disciplines, a high genetic potential is necessary, but then you also need to train really hard!

Vor 9 Tage
Ynemey
Ynemey

One of the many things this guy completely misses.

Vor Tag
Dangerous Dave
Dangerous Dave

Fantastic video! After 25 years of Air Traffic in the busiest facility in the US, I was able to recognize when someone would make it through a training program versus someone that would need to go to a lesser facility or even let go. All I needed was an one hour session. I had a 100% success rate that baffled my management and training program. It was simple to spot but difficult to explain. After watching someone on a training session, they would slowly transform their thinking exactly the way you described in the video. You could see growth and understanding and occasionally experimenting with techniques. The folks that didn't make, showed very little to no change. Every person in training would get 100's of hours of training, yet it was predictable as to the outcome just from one session no matter where they were in training. Now I understand what I was able to see in each individual. Thank you!

Vor 8 Tage
Complex Little Pirate
Complex Little Pirate

The combination of your user name and profession amuses me, well done!

Vor 3 Tage
Ali Sancaklı
Ali Sancaklı

4:03 - Definition of the expertise 5:00 - Repeated attemps with feedback 6:46 - Valid environment 11:21 - Timely feedback 13:50 - Don't get too comfortable

Vor 14 Tage
social media break
social media break

@Liberty Prime only in part. Good video. Check out other videos as well :)

Vor 10 Tage
Liberty Prime
Liberty Prime

It's funny how many times this comment is repeated. I'm becoming an expert.

Vor 10 Tage
social media break
social media break

@0000song0000  @0000song0000  this is the part where im stuck and also very curious. And i actually am in favor of educational games. Id like to help design one. But is it better gaming or a better educational system? Both I think are going to be crucial. A combination of teaching topics in fun but logical environments is addicting. But we'd also need scenarios where the concepts are applied actively. Or else everything just becomes ...... untranslatable. .......enter in vr and simulated learning. One of the positives (despite a ton of negatives) in our current social media situation. And making it free, affordable or accesible to people.

Vor 11 Tage
Ramesh Patel
Ramesh Patel

what is the meaning of low validity in "valid environment" ? Please explain me

Vor 12 Tage
Kraterlandschaft
Kraterlandschaft

Expert commenter right here.

Vor 12 Tage
Μαθαίνω ελληνικά
Μαθαίνω ελληνικά

I recently set myself the challenge to learn how to speak Greek. This has been a really helpful video to remind me to make time for deliberate practice. That for me means not just repeating the words and phrases I know but pushing myself to use different ones and to start new conversations.

Vor 5 Tage
Julian Binder
Julian Binder

with language learning actually talking to native speakers is very good since it automatically gives you new words, so you don't need as much deliberate Praxis

Vor 2 Tage
Eran Malloch
Eran Malloch

Great video Derek. As always! I was reminded when you talked about system 1 & system 2 of something I learned decades ago in sales, although this applies to pretty well any endeavour you choose to learn & master. Long version short: there are 4 different components to how to learn. There is competence level (incompetent or competent) and conscious level (conscious or unconscious). As you started learning a new skill, you were considered unconscious incompetent - you didn't know what you needed to know & were unaware of that combined with being largely incompetent at it. As you got better, you moved up to conscious incompetent (where you now understand that you didn't know what to do and you were still incompetent at doing it). Then you could move up another level to concious competent (at this point, you're good at something BUT you have to still focus hard to do the task) and then finally, the ultimate level is unconscious competent (which is where you are so good AND practiced at the task you don't need to think and devote all your brain power to do it AND you're also competent at it). The goal in sales training was to become so good at it that it was an unconscious/effortless skill that you were successful at.

Vor 3 Tage
bipul verma
bipul verma

Expertise has its limitations because they have a very specific perspective built over time- good at doing one and only one thing - physicists, doctors, musician, etc. It is very hard to come out of this single perspective of looking at things. This is another reason why it is necessary to keep challenging oneself to learn new things preferably in a very different domain.

Vor Tag
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME

☝️✍️☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️

Vor Tag
ObviouslyASMR
ObviouslyASMR

These four things actually made me think of what's required for AI to learn something 1. Repeated Attempts with feedback: This represents the data you've got and its labels, or alternatively actual attempts and rewards in the case of reinforcement learning. Examples are AI "attempting" to classify images of dogs/cats and being told it's right or wrong. For RL it could be a chess playing AI playing a match and receiving feedback in the form of winning or losing. 2. Valid Environment: Like illustrated for humans in the video, if the environment is random, AI won't end up learning anything. However in the button example, unlike the human, and much like the rat, the AI should converge to only choosing the green button. If the input to the AI is the same for each attempt this convergence should happen pretty much immediately. If the input is completely random the AI will still attempt to find patterns like the human, but I believe it should still converge to only the choice with the highest probability. 3. Timely Feedback: This one isn't super relevant to supervised learning since it's assumed the data is provided with labels, no matter how timely those labels/feedback were given in the data gathering stage. For example, if you're using AI to predict grades of students based on their past grades, you won't wait for current students to get their grades; you'd simply train on past data that already includes the feedback (which I guess is also possible for humans actually). Timely feedback is more relevant to reinforcement learning. That's why RL training is often done in simulations instead of the real world: to speed up feedback (and also to limit actual real world damage in some cases, like in robotics or self-driving). An example of this sped up feedback is the famous AlphaStar playing a custom version of the StarCraft game, where instead of waiting for the standard game in real time, it was able to play something crazy like 400 years overnight. However, this is actually just learning faster. The AI would learn just as well if it didn't have timely feedback, just slower. For humans I guess the problem is that we might forget our thought process and decision by the time the feedback arrives, because our minds are occupied with other things and not focused on a single goal. 4. Deliberate Practice / Don't get too comfortable: Indeed if AI comes across certain rare examples, and then keeps training afterwards without seeing similar examples again, it can end up "forgetting". This happens because the model is continuously optimized for the most recent batch of examples (in mini-batch gradient decent at least), which means at every nudge of its parameters it does not care at all about previous batches. The reason this works is because the batches have patterns in common, and therefore the model will learn these common patterns, and gradually forget anything that doesn't line up with these patterns. This is a feature, not a bug; if it learned everything, instead of just the patterns, that's simply memorization, which doesn't generalize to new examples not included in the data. Basically, going by this video, if a human can be an expert at something, AI can do it better (if the data is there) 😌

Vor 7 Tage
D D
D D

depends what kind of data you feed it.

Vor 13 Stunden
Aldrin Miles Partosa
Aldrin Miles Partosa

@Ashwin Jain Git-hub copilot but much more better. As you make theoretically everything with it in mere seconds while not having to pay coders millions just for it to made. All you need is to ask it effectively and nicely lol.

Vor 3 Tage
Ashwin Jain
Ashwin Jain

@Aldrin Miles Partosa reminded me of github's copilot lmao

Vor 4 Tage
Aldrin Miles Partosa
Aldrin Miles Partosa

This comment made me generate an idea: what if you make an A.I learn something but with coding, then I think this will make coding more easier for everyone (or flat out don't need it anymore as the A.I will make it for you). Imagine just prompting the program, app, website etc that you want the A.I to do then it made said program in seconds while constructing everything (the code) in such way that it can rival or surpass even the best coders in the field through pattern recognition (the code obviously needs to be readable to humans for correcting the bugs). Not only you do not need our fellow humans the hassle to learn it and democratize it as things should be. This thing might be theoretical for now but like they say, if a human can be an expert at something, an Ai can do it better, even the job of their own coders.

Vor 4 Tage
ObviouslyASMR
ObviouslyASMR

@Esco Obong beautiful analogy of overfitting!

Vor 5 Tage
ONAR Occasionally Needs A Restart
ONAR Occasionally Needs A Restart

I recently had a MASSIVE argument with my university because they repeatedly did not provide any feedback to essays or exams. Just a mark and that's it. I backed my perspective with a ton of academic works on education, that I doubt any of them ever read. I'm going to show them this video. Because university courses that don't provide feedback are virtually useless.

Vor 15 Tage
Daan vw
Daan vw

@Peter Quadarella no it's not. Germany Vs the USA is country Vs country, so just like for example Canada Vs the USA. And New Jersey is a state so is would be better comparable to another state/province like Nordrhein-Westfalen, Catalonia or Gelderland

Vor 18 Stunden
ONAR Occasionally Needs A Restart
ONAR Occasionally Needs A Restart

@Tiara Roxeanne ​there were 12 students in the course. Even ignoring that, many universities require lecturers to write reports in order to explain the grade they gave (this is to protect the university/lecturer should a student complain about low mark and want it remarked). That was true for this university. Even if neither of these things are the case, the fact is that a lecturer who neglects their students is EITHER an absued employee (overworked or otherwise) OR a bad lecturer. The ONLY recourse the student has is to complain, and it becomes the lecturers job to throw the problem upwards into management to highlight how the problem can be fixed. Telling a student "I'm overworked" might be an excellent reason, but isn't of itself good enough. Especially when the student is paying for their education, it is only the students job to get that education.

Vor 3 Tage
Tiara Roxeanne
Tiara Roxeanne

Hey, tell me what they say after watching your video. My guess: giving feedback takes much more time which the lecturers don't really have.

Vor 4 Tage
Flight Doc
Flight Doc

Love how that last green arrow "checks off slowly" in the recap of the 4 things needed.. subtle but powerful lol

Vor 4 Tage
Mickey Radochay
Mickey Radochay

For those interested, a lot of the video seems to be based on two books, “Range” by David Epstein, and “Outliers” by Malcolm Gladwell. Both are good and I recommend them if you are interested in learning more about the topics in this video!

Vor 6 Tage
Allan Stokes
Allan Stokes

And _Superforecasting_ by Tetlock.

Vor 4 Tage
bboyhoyack
bboyhoyack

Also "Thinking, Fast and Slow" by Daniel Kahneman which talks about System 1 and 2. I'm just about finishing this book and I recognized some of the topics he was talking about.

Vor 4 Tage
Josiah Saly
Josiah Saly

This is very interesting. I have a bit of experience in competitive gaming, or eSports as it is also referred to. In my experience I was doing exactly what this video is discussing. Constantly playing, constantly analyzing, and constantly seeking harder and harder games. I once applied to do a TED talk about this exact subject and my experiences with it, but was unfortunately denied the chance to do so. Still, this is an extremely good video on how we, as people, develop the skills we wish to develop.

Vor 2 Tage
Ynemey
Ynemey

Sounds like you're too intelligent to do a TED talk.

Vor Tag
Michael Brook
Michael Brook

Thank you for including the illustration of time driving a car, does not = better performance or ability. I use this when I teach my music students and for myself when I practice. Time does not always equal experience. Its so important that society value teachers/coaches that teach deliberate-practice techniques which can improve one's life. I plan to send this video to my students. Thanks!

Vor 8 Tage
Dominic Veconi
Dominic Veconi

Mathematician here. I did a lot of teaching when I was in grad school, and this video really hits all the nails on all the heads. Only in my last year did I figure out a concrete mantra to tell my students, encouraging them to not get discouraged by challenging problems because you only improve a skill by pushing yourself beyond what's comfortable. (The words I used were "engaging with uncertainty" rather than "deliberate practice", but they amounted to the same thing.)

Vor 14 Tage
Murph
Murph

@Red Scotland He's just writing out his thoughts. That's literally what the comments section is for. There's no need to get so offended because someone just related a story.

Vor 12 Tage
Autistic POV
Autistic POV

i was lucky to learn at very young age that trial and error is the fastest way to learn , understand , improve . i love driving . driven trucks for 14 years . but in school before i dropped to low level . i had high level math and physics class. (sorry for my english). even for things like driving it's only possible to improve if you push beyond the limit . (do that in a safe place) otherwise how can you tell what's the limit. but without desire to understand the driving skills never improve. it kinda applies to everything. i simulate driving with a full simulator because it's impossible to predict other drivers with 100% accuracy. and my error rate is very low irl but not 0 . in simulation we just send it to speed up the learning curve . error rate pretty high but so is the learning curve . thinking this way has also made it easier for me to accept error from other people irl. but it seems like this way of thinking is going away.

Vor 12 Tage
Dominic Veconi
Dominic Veconi

@jack hartmann I'm sorry to hear that you had a less than ideal experience with some math professors. Many of us want our students to succeed just as much, and want to help ensure they understand the material, like your physics profs.

Vor 12 Tage
Dominic Veconi
Dominic Veconi

@Chris -0 if you're not comfortable doing something in mathematics, it's simply because there's a concept you don't understand. It's no different from feeling uncomfortable (or if you prefer, "challenged") with a certain chess puzzle to try to push yourself beyond what you can currently do comfortably (or without a challenge). Now, do you *need* to be uncomfortable doing mathematics? No, not if you're stopping at calculus, say. But if you want to continue learning it, then yes: it's part of pushing yourself beyond your current capabilities.

Vor 12 Tage
Dominic Veconi
Dominic Veconi

@Red Scotland you're reading an awful lot into the intention of what I wrote. I'm simply speaking from my own experience as both a math student and math educator, and (as pertains to the video) an expert in mathematics, or at least a certain area within mathematics.

Vor 12 Tage
SKRT
SKRT

I've been playing piano for almost 20 years now and it all feels like instinct at some point. You basically can play a very complex piece without thinking about the piece or what notes to play. It all falls down to muscle memory which is thousands of played repetitions. Very interesting indeed.

Vor 6 Tage
Laone Ntwaetsile
Laone Ntwaetsile

I follow you on Facebook 🔥

Vor 2 Tage
Gnarlow
Gnarlow

Wow. You actually quantified the statement “those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it”

Vor 8 Tage
Lucky the Lemur
Lucky the Lemur

Not quite, as a general rule if thumb I guess but in reality history has way to many varying contexts, especially relating to the time period and sociological, political and geopolitical contexts really. There are just alot of variable through time for history to be consistent with a current situation to a high degree. But to a certain extent yeah. He's more talking about straight up 'classical conditioning' and 'operant conditioning'

Vor 8 Stunden
Perry Pereyra
Perry Pereyra

I'm dumb please elaborate 😅

Vor 5 Tage
euisa cous
euisa cous

dedicated to the legacy of Ericsson's work across several fields of psychology.

Vor 7 Tage
🌹 Lora F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🌼
🌹 Lora F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🌼

The pattern recognition became very clear to me when I learned Morse code. The human brain takes 50 milliseconds to process and understand a sound. People regularly send and receive Morse code at 30 words per minute, which puts the dit character and the gap between all characters at 40 milliseconds. So you literally have to process sounds faster than the brain can recognize them. Over time you start to hear whole words in the code rather than individual letters, but you still have to decode call signs character by character. You basically cache the sounds in your brain without processing them, and once the whole set of characters passes, your brain is able to turn it into an idea and add it to the stack of previous ideas while your ears are already caching the next set of characters.

Vor 7 Tage
119334052
119334052

That was a great video. I actually read books about this topic and can recommend especially these two books: Daniel Coyle - The Talent Code Daniel Kahnemann - Thinking Fast And Slow Really great books, especially the second is exquisit.

Vor 7 Tage
Just Another Hot Guy with a Mustache
Just Another Hot Guy with a Mustache

The Four Things are: 4:55 1. Repeated attempts with feedback 6:48 2. Valid Environment 11:22 3. Timely Feedback 13:52 4. Don’t get too comfortable

Vor 16 Tage
Cyphlix
Cyphlix

the hero we need

Vor 10 Tage
Liberty Prime
Liberty Prime

It's funny how many times this comment is repeated. I'm becoming an expert.

Vor 10 Tage
Just Another Hot Guy with a Mustache
Just Another Hot Guy with a Mustache

@froge Don’t think of me anything more than a random troller, joker, clown. This comment was just a joke, since Veritasium’s videos are to be watched in full length, this comment also made fun of videos that take too long to get to the point and poked at other comments of similar nature. In other words, this comment is a work of art, a meaningful analogy.

Vor 15 Tage
Joshua Thomas
Joshua Thomas

@Joan Sparky never thought about the adverse side effects of speeding up youtube videos all these years, I never noticed anything

Vor 15 Tage
Joan Sparky
Joan Sparky

@markae0 I only speed up recorded information so that I still understand it, not to get through a video. If someone has a densely packed video where nearly every word matters and conveys a lot of information.. sure, I have to go slow and will go slow to understand the information. But for most of youtube the information content is low and the speed by which it is being delivered is also slow. There I speed up as my lifetime is limited as well. Sometimes it would be faster to just read a couple hundred words actually instead of listening to someone "reading them to me". Thank deity-xy for the youtube enhancer extension and it's speed selector right below the video that can go as fine grained as you want (increase/decrease of 0.1x for me works well).

Vor 15 Tage
Kawaranai
Kawaranai

This video gives me hope that I'll be able to overcome the difficulties I'm facing at the moment. I'm a Computer Science student but I'm a very average coder and problem solver. This has been an issue for years, throwing me into tough situations academically. Now that organisations are beginning to recruit students of my year from university, I'm floundering while trying to get myself an internship. I'll try my hardest to put into practice what this video summarizes. As a reminder to myself, 1. Valid environment 2. Many repetitions 3. Timely feedback 4. Challenge yourself, actively focus on improving your weaknesses.

Vor 4 Tage
Z C
Z C

The fact that you care this much, shows that greatness is on the way if you put in the work. Keep it up champ.

Vor 17 Stunden
TwiztidMenace
TwiztidMenace

Great video! I've always been interested in the whole 10,000 hours to become an expert idea, but I know plenty of people who've put in the time and don't have the mastery. It makes a lot more sense when you emphasize "deliberate practice" over just doing the same thing over and over. There's a TED talk (The first 20 hours -- how to learn anything by Josh Kaufman) that gets into this topic as well, with a fun bonus song at the end. Your explanation was more in-depth, but it's worth the watch if you're interested in this type of thing!

Vor 8 Tage
Jonathon Wearn
Jonathon Wearn

Great Video. I'm also a long time, not great guitar player. I learned about chunking watching a Troy Grady video about how you can learn a 6-note guitar pattern and your brain will be able to memorize it. Then you can connect different 6-note patterns together to learn longer pieces. Very cool stuff. I started using this chunking method while practicing a few years ago, and I'm definitely a much better guitar player. It actually works!

Vor 9 Tage
Leonardo Gustavo
Leonardo Gustavo

Always good to hear your thoughtful and logical analysis. I don't care about bullish or bearish market. Trade a small percentage of your portfolio rather than going in and out every couple weeks trying to time the market trading went smooth for me as I was able to raise over 8.4 BTC when I started at 3 BTC in just few weeks implementing Jim Smith and tips

Vor 3 Tage
His Telegram @JIM5T
His Telegram @JIM5T

Vor 3 Tage
Beth Alvin
Beth Alvin

Thanks for dropping this here, the right information is what is needed to succeed in this market and generally in life

Vor 3 Tage
oliver bolton
oliver bolton

Bitcoin is the top performing asset of the past year, and it's getting higher too. I am delighted to be part of this opportunity with Jım Smıth as my guide.

Vor 3 Tage
akoko akira
akoko akira

Indeed these comments are mind catching and I also wish to be part of Jım Smıth trading session.

Vor 3 Tage
Karen Burg
Karen Burg

O' Yes I'm a living testimony of Jım Smıth Jım Smıth has changed my financial status for the best. All thanks to my aunty who introduced him to me.

Vor 3 Tage
Chris N
Chris N

This was incredibly timely and it expounded on a principle I learned only recently. When you practise something and get frustrated, as we all do, that is **not** the time to pause. That chord you can't quite play, the card trick you can't quite nail - keep at it for five more minutes and tell yourself this deliberately. I think this is also what the fourth point in the video is about, because in those 'five more minutes', you are at the bleeding edge of your skill and that is precisely when you grow.

Vor 16 Tage
Glendy Beatriz
Glendy Beatriz

@Chris N wow thank you for this. Tonight I was taken to a concert because of free tickets. Should have been fun and exciting. I was already tired and maybe anxious Getting there with swarms of people, smells, so much stimulation + I quit drinking alcohol. It was a recipe for anxiety I didn’t have fun. I wasn’t miserable but I know I could have enjoyed myself considering this artist is pop and high energy music. Went outside for a moment and realized it was anxiety. Didn’t even realize it. Thought I was just tired. I’ll try this approach next time I’m in a situation that is similar

Vor 11 Tage
Max payne
Max payne

@bill shiff facts

Vor 13 Tage
Max payne
Max payne

@Tinchozz This is actually a fact with some stuff like a guitar. Ex. Tremolo picking. Sometimes (when learning) a new technique just suddenly clicks when you get back to it a day or two.... Maybe even a week

Vor 13 Tage
BetBryce
BetBryce

Why do edges bleed

Vor 13 Tage
Tigrafale
Tigrafale

@pyropulse why are you so mad lol. I cannot believe that you have *never* got frustrated when learning. Plus, it's not about just quitting it's about taking a break. Op was saying to delay the break. It's not about just quitting.

Vor 13 Tage
F.J.
F.J.

With farming, I can agree with this video on just about everything. Being a mechanic, I will overlook the obvious or the rare cases when diagnosing sometimes, driving, I can overlook the very simple or very rare cases, just about any task. Keep trying new things and trying the same thing a different way and that helps a lot.

Vor Tag
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME

☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️☝️

Vor 9 Stunden
Sam Blythe
Sam Blythe

This is a great video on a really interesting topic. However, one topic it doesn’t touch on is whether a certain ‘natural talent’ is also important in becoming an expert at something. Does natural talent actually exist or is it a combination of genetic factors and transferable skills people learn from an early age using the methods mentioned in this video that allow them to become an ‘expert’ more easily?

Vor 8 Tage
Kyle Marriott
Kyle Marriott

Hello

Vor 8 Tage
ThaTalent1
ThaTalent1

Loved the video! Was hoping to see how data scientists used these principles to build algorithms for machine learning. Reinforced learning and deep learning have been greatly influenced by how the human brain operates and basically acts as a shortcut to spending 10,000 hours (since it can train in parallel.)

Vor 8 Tage
Managing Essentials
Managing Essentials

Great content, Derek. With so much frivolous content out there, I really find your content truly engaging. As someone who recently launched a channel on management skills, I can only take inspiration from the way you've built a loyal subscriber base. Kudos!

Vor 4 Tage
Amanthika Anbalagan
Amanthika Anbalagan

1.Repeated attempts with feedback - "4:47" 2.Valid Environment - "6:57" 3.Timely feedback - "11:21" 4.Don't get too comfortable - "13:53" Along with the 10,000 hours 😄

Vor 10 Tage
Sehen K.S
Sehen K.S

@Hassan H hmm

Vor 3 Tage
Hassan H
Hassan H

@Sehen K.S It might be better to acknowledge that genius is not simply "one who succeeds in attaining these 4 rules early or in less time". There is much more to being a prodigy or genius (whatever we people mean by these terms). For example, apart from these, a person considered among the best in his field has great attitude, passion, creativity, wonder and, arguably the most important of all, persistence.

Vor 4 Tage
Kshitiz Srivastava
Kshitiz Srivastava

Thanks man 4th point is very important because whenever I do maths Problem I only do same or simple problems which makes it harder to solve difficult questions. Let's see how much can I improve by doing these steps 😁😁😁

Vor 4 Tage
Sehen K.S
Sehen K.S

@Manny exactly if these people who succeeds in these 4 things with less time than 10,000 they are called a prodigy or genius

Vor 5 Tage
Manny
Manny

the 10000 isn't necessary, i think thats just the amount of time it seems to take most people to gain a solid understanding of those 4 principles within their field, whether they realize it or not.

Vor 9 Tage
Tim Bomb
Tim Bomb

Makes me realise how much I rely on my secondary though processes. Often when I'm learning things I kind of switch off my active thinking and just let my brain take in the data and form patterns on it's own.

Vor Tag
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME

☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️☝️

Vor 9 Stunden
Ctrl - Del
Ctrl - Del

Thank you for this video. 5 weeks ago I started to learn the Russian language through an app which will present you with new words every single lesson. These words are then presented to you in many different ways so it is playful and engadging. There is also a competitive element built in the app where you increase your level every time gain a certain amount of points. It really pushes you to learn and it works. Because I was interested how we learn I also kept track how I learn and what I remember. It is very interesting to see myself improve. The elements that you mention do come back. When you use the app in the right way, it does keep you on the edge of what you know, after each word or sentence the app tells you how you did. Naturally it is a high validity environment. Languages follow rules and are certainly not random allthough in Russian you have some freedom to play with the order of words.

Vor 5 Tage
annette
annette

That sounds interesting, what is this app called?

Vor 4 Tage
Yuppi
Yuppi

The chess thing resembles a lot of music. Like playing a guitar, you recognize a lick in style of some player, now just in different key or place or context or slightly altered. You don't pay attention to the individual notes but the big picture they make, you already know the individual notes as long as you can put a header on the pattern. And you play it immediately instead of trying it out, because you have already practiced it. Single bends, slides and note changes come easy once you got the basics. I feel like with the wall street example there might be a slight chance that there was something similar to the big short going on which made it more likely. On the other hand it was sort of shocking how long it took and how little the culprits suffered. What they explained in the end was that willful ignorance and sunk cost fallacy, a corruption of kind, playing a big role in how the correct statistical analysis almost lost to the system in place. Humans are really bad at predicting just because you start making way too nuanced analysis on impactful things from too much information. At least to my observation the less you have information, the better your prediction goes because you don't try to game it more than the relevant information you have. Started learning olympic weightlifting recently. Obviously on my own, just watching youtube. Learned so much and specifically those things addressing issues. Doing partial exercises like snatch balance, muscle snatch, snatch pull, hang snatch etc etc because most of it is about technique and different exercise address different shortcomings, and in a mysterious way are easier to complete correctly and fix the technique in the lift.

Vor 8 Tage
Brooklyn 🔴 𝔽**СК МЕ - СНЕℂ𝕂 𝕄𝕐 Рℝ𝟘𝔽𝕀𝕃Е💛
Brooklyn	🔴 𝔽**СК МЕ - СНЕℂ𝕂 𝕄𝕐 Рℝ𝟘𝔽𝕀𝕃Е💛

That was one of the best intros I've ever seen in a video. It took 5 minutes to get to the point of the video, but the 5 minutes were so interesting that I didn't even realize they'd passed at all. And they set the rest of the video up so well. Excellent job.

Vor 6 Tage
Eddie Hollywood
Eddie Hollywood

It would be interesting to have a deep dive video on deliberate practice - what constitutes it, how to engage in it proactively, etc.

Vor 16 Tage
Guy G.
Guy G.

It's an ill-defined concept without credible definition or implementation, if i trust the recent scientific paper on the subject.

Vor 16 Tage
Sjors Angevare
Sjors Angevare

Yes! When trying to become "expert" at video game, the first three criteria are almost always met. It's the deliberate practice that is hard to do. You always just "play" the game.

Vor 16 Tage
Akash Kumar Dutta
Akash Kumar Dutta

Search goldilocks principle

Vor 16 Tage
Jake Dewey
Jake Dewey

@Braver Leech Do you mean tacit knowledge?

Vor 16 Tage
Braver Leech
Braver Leech

Deliberate practice has become a buzz word now. Look into tactic knowledge it will change the way you view experts

Vor 16 Tage
Ava RoSe Sᴇx Cʜᴀɴɴᴇʟ 21
Ava RoSe Sᴇx Cʜᴀɴɴᴇʟ 21

That was one of the best intros I've ever seen in a video. It took 5 minutes to get to the point of the video, but the 5 minutes were so interesting that I didn't even realize they'd passed at all. And they set the rest of the video up so well. Excellent job.

Vor 6 Tage
Marten
Marten

Interesting to think about this in the context of my own field: Computer Science. Especially when writing code, it does illuminate some things for me. I work with a lot of scientist from other fields who mostly write software as a tool for expressing ideas from their respective fields. Most of them have had little to no formal training in writing code before starting to work. What I notice is that these people fairly easy learn how to avoid bugs and write code that executes, but are terrible at preventing structural issues (e.g. does this software scale easily or how easy is it to add new functionality in the future). The timely feedback issue seems crititcal here. When trying to write code that executes, the feedback is almost immediate: The software returns an error on running or it doesn't. The structural problems however aren't evaluated by any immediate system or even at all (especially for people who's main area of expertise is actually not software).

Vor 3 Tage
Kyrylo Shevchuk
Kyrylo Shevchuk

Derek is absolutely amazing! Genius of our times. Everytime I watch his videos I have goosebumps. Thanks for all your knoweledge that you bring to the world. Love you so much!

Vor 8 Tage
Rahi Shah
Rahi Shah

Insightful, concise and easy to grasp. Great video Derek!

Vor 6 Tage
Νεόπλαστος
Νεόπλαστος

Thank you. I spent so much time feeling helpless learning coding and you finally gave me a way to learn how to learn. 🙏

Vor 2 Tage
Tanvir Ahmed
Tanvir Ahmed

Has anyone ever encountered temporary memory loss of other experties while specialising in one aspect? I think the next video could be on the human-possibilities on becoming experts in multiple areas

Vor 8 Tage
-WoF- DarkNewton
-WoF- DarkNewton

This video contained some things I knew consciously, but also several I only knew intuitively (especially the environment validity). Condensing this topic is extremely useful for me and listing the 4 things at the end was greatly appreciated.

Vor 8 Tage
Aileron Helicopters INC
Aileron Helicopters INC

To save your time: 16:24 Expertise is recognition, and recognition comes from Incredible amount of highly structured information stored in long term memory, to build that memory requires; _ Valid Environment _ Many reputation _ Timely Feedback _ Thousands of hours of deliberate practice

Vor Tag
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☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️☝️

Vor 9 Stunden
CheesyBread
CheesyBread

In my freshman year of highschool, my math teacher gave us a challenge where the student who could remember the most digits of PI on PI-day (March 14th) would get a few points added to their lowest test score. This gave us like 4 days or something to try to remember. I won with 100 digits. Nobody else really cared that much so the most anyone else got was like 10 digits. Yes I am as much of a loser now as I was back then.

Vor 16 Tage
donutwindy
donutwindy

I only know around 30. What's amazing is I memorized it 20 years ago but can and will never forget it for some reason. Now I'm tempted to memorize my 24 word master crypto key. That's something worth never forgetting. People have lost their key. They should have just memorized it.

Vor 12 Tage
Grant Gussman
Grant Gussman

Having memorized 23,000 digits, I applaud you! I know firsthand how hard it is to justify to people the reason for doing something like this. For me, the real value had nothing to do with the digits themselves but in learning about my own brain in a new way.

Vor 15 Tage
Michael Steeves
Michael Steeves

I memorized 50 digits when I was in 8th grade. 45 years later I still remember 30 digits without trying or practice. Useless skill... NASA uses 15 digits for interplanetary calculations. That is sufficient to determine the position of Voyageur to 1.5 inches.

Vor 15 Tage
Ammon Quitalig
Ammon Quitalig

@Alan Steyrbach so its like FOMO?

Vor 15 Tage
Like Bot
Like Bot

@Dewiz Where did you hear that from? I happen to know that the year has the exact same number of days in every country. July even has a 4th in Canada.

Vor 16 Tage
WatchLot-Till-I-Drop
WatchLot-Till-I-Drop

I find it that especially in these ongoing era of Machine_ learning success and collaboration_ with_ neuro-science, the inner-workings and achievement_ feats of the human mind comes even more to light. you Derick I appreciate your grasping of the phenomenon of pattern recognition in intelligent system. Not just that you understand repetition is key, but suitability conditioned repetition. involving "feedback and regularities_ in_ observable_ enviornmental_ data". Your work on this video serves, to some extent, as that of a pioneering work in the transendance our overstigmatized understanding of human_ intelligence (its faculties & attributes). Great work Derick. Lead us on! despite threats of demise to obsolete (or also even harmful) paradigms and social-construct, come what may.

Vor 8 Tage
ٴ
ٴ

Loved it. Such a high quality knowledge packed video.🙌👏

Vor 4 Tage
Blue Sky
Blue Sky

As an excpert in this field, I approve & confirm most of your assertions. Well done !! Great video. Very well done.

Vor 6 Tage
Travis Stump
Travis Stump

I am overcome with emotion when considering the value of people who add value to my life. Thank you, Derek.

Vor 8 Tage
Belle 🍆 2 y.0 -check My V!deo
Belle 🍆 2 y.0 -check My V!deo

#4: Don't be comfortable. This instantly reminded me of H Day in Sweden, the day when everyone switched driving from the left to the right side of the roadways. Many people were certain that it would cause untold deaths and many more accidents. In fact, for many years afterward, accident rates plummeted. The assumption is that people were suddenly paying much closer attention to how they drive. Having driven on the opposite side of the road in another country, I'm sure that it also made driving fairly stressful, but that seems like a fair price to pay for fewer injuries and deaths caused by lazy, comfortable driving habits. #4 is a great, general lesson. The whole event is rather fascinating. If you're curious to learn more about it, there's a great, short episode by the podcast "99% Invisible" that's worth checking out. It's episode 215, titled "H-Day."

Vor 12 Tage
YraxZovaldo
YraxZovaldo

I don’t believe this. I change the side of road I drive on every month and don’t have the experience of less accidents.

Vor 8 Tage
thinthle
thinthle

@J H Agreed Burnout is a dangerous thing, everything has a cost eventually.

Vor 9 Tage
astrophysx
astrophysx

Similar to a sprinter that switched starting foot

Vor 9 Tage
J H
J H

I went to MIT grad physics with a fellowship. I’d attribute much of that to refusing to be satisfied with whatever my level of accomplishment seemed to be, since I was 11, challenging myself, asking myself questions I couldn’t answer and which I may not answer until years later. However, without other positive balance, it’s an unbalancing way to live. Even when accepted to MIT, which I’d worked towards for many years, I wasn’t “happy”.

Vor 9 Tage
yawahtAsickname
yawahtAsickname

This is very interesting

Vor 9 Tage
Sanome
Sanome

super amazing videos derek :) proud that society has people like you encouraging the future of science , sad that people are spreading false news on you

Vor 5 Tage
Leeepo Faith
Leeepo Faith

"Excellence is not an art, it's pure Habit. We are what we repeatedly do."

Vor 8 Tage
Ynemey
Ynemey

@Leeepo Faith Even then, it depends, but I would say it is unlikely to yield mastery of the thing you are doing. For example, I debate people, but often I don't have similar debates, and I try not to use the same style of argument in an attempt to learn what works and what doesn't. I learn through failure more than success in this way.

Vor 4 Stunden
Leeepo Faith
Leeepo Faith

@Ynemey different opponent still means you participate in tbe same action, just vs different people.

Vor 4 Stunden
Ynemey
Ynemey

@Leeepo Faith I don't learn how to become better at a mental skill by repeatedly facing the same opponents; I need to face different opponents in order to challenge my mind to scenarios that no one person could ever come up with on their own. Variety is a much more effective teacher than habit in the vast majority of mental exercises.

Vor 15 Stunden
Leeepo Faith
Leeepo Faith

@Ynemey i disagree. Learning how to 3D model, how to become funnier, being less depressed, all are mental tasks and i improved on them^^

Vor 18 Stunden
Ynemey
Ynemey

That only applies to physical acts, not mental ones.

Vor Tag
ThatMNTishman
ThatMNTishman

Such a great channel. You do an amazing job at communicating and presenting with clarity and engagement.

Vor 9 Tage
claus4tw
claus4tw

I really enjoyed this video and I am wondering: do you have a study that shows if learning from failures you are doing yourself is better/worse/same as learning from failures others have made and publish? Do we as humans need to get immediate feedback from our experience or can we also learn that from others the same way?

Vor 3 Stunden
Dr. Trefor Bazett
Dr. Trefor Bazett

As a mathematician, these four factors definitely resonated with me and I think math is field that really encourages that deliberate practice. Great video!

Vor 15 Tage
Seb
Seb

I think this whole video was moronic, contradicts itself, misses points and acts like humans are robots.

Vor 13 Tage
archaurore
archaurore

I was thinking this while watching the video. That and programming...

Vor 13 Tage
johnno lang
johnno lang

@Hagen Farrell Formulas for calculus are not things to learn. There are none you need to remember. Calculus is a discipline you need to UNDERSTAND, not REMEMBER. I use the calculus just about every day.

Vor 13 Tage
Artaxerxes :
Artaxerxes :

Isn't that obvious though

Vor 13 Tage
11CA1 - 24 - Phan Tiến Minh Thùy
11CA1 - 24 - Phan Tiến Minh Thùy

Fancy seeing you here, my math teacher!

Vor 13 Tage
bom litle shakllaka
bom litle shakllaka

For later 04:56 1. Repeated Attempts with feedback 06:52 2. Valid Environment 11:23 3. Timely Feedback 13:46 4. Don't get too comfortable

Vor 7 Tage
IndisputableFacts
IndisputableFacts

There are two different propositions suggested by this title: Actually becoming skilled at something and being recognized by a society as being skilled at something. Being recognized takes little skill at the particular thing, but it's a skill on its own... Kinda like getting good grades has at best a sidling relationship with actually getting a good understanding of the material the course teaches.

Vor 9 Tage
Vortex Tornado
Vortex Tornado

True, and with the college admissions example shown it's not too surprising if the formula can predict students' GPA better but real admissions officers want to admit students that will mesh with the campus community and meaningfully help society. To build off of what you said, the student who has a pretty looking report card is not necessarily the one who is applying their learning outside of the classroom and inspiring others.

Vor 6 Tage
Not What You Think
Not What You Think

It’s true! *Confetti* *fireworks* is the ultimate YouTuber dopamine hit!

Vor 7 Tage
Richard Coker
Richard Coker

This was an amazing and engaging video ! Learnt so much

Vor 5 Tage
Faus
Faus

FOUR THINGS YOU NEED TO BECOME AN EXPERT 1. valid environment (structured, patterned) 2. many repetitions (not once-in-a-lifetime thing) 3. timely feedback (feedback as soon as you perform an action) 4. deliberate practice (practice outside of your comfort zone, at the edge of our ability, the zone of proximal learning)

Vor 15 Tage
Matthew Baier
Matthew Baier

This is how I will code from now on

Vor 8 Tage
Dario Mladenovski
Dario Mladenovski

I wish he gave credit to Ericsson or at least mentioned his book "Peak" because he used all the resources from his book to make this video but didn't even mention him or his book once

Vor 10 Tage
DepressedMF
DepressedMF

@Caleb Larsen so we shouldn't waste our time and money trying to learn how to trade the stock markets?

Vor 10 Tage
Priya Ghoshal
Priya Ghoshal

@Caleb Larsen ok thank you 😇I can understand

Vor 10 Tage
Caleb Larsen
Caleb Larsen

@Priya Ghoshal it means that you can't be an expert at something completely random (gambling, predicting earthquakes, the stock market).

Vor 10 Tage
G58
G58

The last two years have proved very enlightening with respect to the expert myths, and dangerous too. But those observing closely who also did due diligence on the data very early on, and continued to question any and all data, as well as any assumptions made along the way, have come to a few very interesting conclusions. One conclusion is that Darwin has a plan for the sheeple. 🧐😎😜 Peace

Vor 9 Stunden
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME
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☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️

Vor 9 Stunden
Kia 🍆 I am Online 💋 F Uc_k me
Kia 🍆 I am Online 💋 F Uc_k me

04:56 1. Repeated Attempts with feedback 06:52 2. Valid Environment 11:23 3. Timely Feedback 13:46 4. Don't get too comfortable

Vor 8 Tage
1
1

04:56 1. Repeated Attempts with feedback 06:52 2. Valid Environment 11:23 3. Timely Feedback 13:46 4. Don't get too comfortable

Vor 2 Tage
🌹 Lora F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🌼
🌹 Lora F-'ck M'-e - Check my P'ro'fi-le🌼

The pattern recognition became very clear to me when I learned Morse code. The human brain takes 50 milliseconds to process and understand a sound. People regularly send and receive Morse code at 30 words per minute, which puts the dit character and the gap between all characters at 40 milliseconds. So you literally have to process sounds faster than the brain can recognize them. Over time you start to hear whole words in the code rather than individual letters, but you still have to decode call signs character by character. You basically cache the sounds in your brain without processing them, and once the whole set of characters passes, your brain is able to turn it into an idea and add it to the stack of previous ideas while your ears are already caching the next set of characters.

Vor 7 Tage
Eugene
Eugene

When I was a teenager I trained myself to pronounce words in reverse. Absolutely useless skill but it was fun. I could reverse any word of any length just instantaneously. I didn't have to process it letter by letter, I just knew the result instantly, it was just popping out in my mind. But if you asked me to reverse a random set of letters instead of valid word I would fail. It worked only for real words.

Vor 15 Tage
Daniel Xavier
Daniel Xavier

@Eugene awesome bro!

Vor 14 Tage
Eugene
Eugene

@Daniel Xavier haven't been doing this for decades. Now I have about 30% of past skill level, so apparently it degrades without practicing. However I believe I could restore it after few weeks of training.

Vor 14 Tage
Khaled
Khaled

hmm nothing is useless nowadays, record yourself while doing it and post a reel video on instagram & TikTok and thank me later :) but keep doing it gradually

Vor 14 Tage
Daniel Xavier
Daniel Xavier

You still do it ? Can you record a video about it ?

Vor 14 Tage
TrollAr
TrollAr

@Yiran Instant takes me no time at all, but then the aneously takes quite a bit "Instantaneously" takes me about 2 seconds and a half to type, while i usually do so at ~90wpm

Vor 14 Tage
Your Unknown Friend 💗
Your Unknown Friend  💗

The pattern recognition became very clear to me when I learned Morse code. The human brain takes 50 milliseconds to process and understand a sound. People regularly send and receive Morse code at 30 words per minute, which puts the dit character and the gap between all characters at 40 milliseconds. So you literally have to process sounds faster than the brain can recognize them. Over time you start to hear whole words in the code rather than individual letters, but you still have to decode call signs character by character. You basically cache the sounds in your brain without processing them, and once the whole set of characters passes, your brain is able to turn it into an idea and add it to the stack of previous ideas while your ears are already caching the next set of characters.

Vor 8 Tage
*:*: Hamster Muffin :*:*
*:*: Hamster Muffin :*:*

The pattern recognition became very clear to me when I learned Morse code. The human brain takes 50 milliseconds to process and understand a sound. People regularly send and receive Morse code at 30 words per minute, which puts the dit character and the gap between all characters at 40 milliseconds. So you literally have to process sounds faster than the brain can recognize them. Over time you start to hear whole words in the code rather than individual letters, but you still have to decode call signs character by character. You basically cache the sounds in your brain without processing them, and once the whole set of characters passes, your brain is able to turn it into an idea and add it to the stack of previous ideas while your ears are already caching the next set of characters.

Vor 7 Tage
Nathan West
Nathan West

I've started training to be a mechanic in 2017, when I was in School I had a Teacher that told us: "even when you're officially a fully qualified worker, you won't really be an expert for an other 2-5 years" well, I had 1 year less training and 1 year after I was finished I started working in a shop with basically just me as a mechanic, the year prior was just internships today I may be a decent mechanic, compared to some other's I've seen working, actually sorta good, but I'm a perfectionist no matter how good I get, I'm never good enough and since I've seen folks with much more experience do half assed jobs, I fix everything on my car myself, nobody else gets to touch it.

Vor 9 Tage
Max Millman
Max Millman

That's the one man, continuously strive for better! Good on you. I've seen some horrendous work on cars too, although admittedly I'm an amateur at a stretch haha

Vor 5 Tage
Beaver House
Beaver House

I think the COVID situation absolutely rocked a lot of peoples faith in "experts". I think that word has likely never been regarded as negatively as it is today.

Vor Tag
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☝️✍️☝️✍️☝️

Vor Tag
Darches
Darches

I've seen this in competitive games too. If player 1 plays for 100 hours and player 2 plays for 50 hours then watches replays of all his games to find mistakes, player 2 will be stronger. Deliberate practice is often the missing piece. It's the difference between playing for fun and playing to win.

Vor 9 Tage
BigBaseBuilder
BigBaseBuilder

This goes for everything i guess. I am an Apex Semi Pro and only get there be questioning every game i made and a saw a bunch of tiny but crucial failures in my gameplay. Then i started to automatically do things, which cost my "life" before. Faster looting, shield swapping no whatter what shield you get, repositioning and get out a fight when i feel not ready for it or when i have the wrong attachments for it. If you force it, it will most likely fail but if you reconsider your actions, you can succed with a higher success rate.

Vor 2 Tage
Oddo
Oddo

@Casual LOL player Danku Challenger is top 0.012%, Master+Grandmaster is 0.16% and 0.03% accordingly. To be top 1% in lol you just have to get to around diamond 3. It is really doable for anyone. Even challenger... It is hard to stay here for a long time, but to climb and promote on a winstreak once is also doable for mere mortals.

Vor 3 Tage
Casual LOL player Danku
Casual LOL player Danku

@dogaru alexandru you think 1 player out of hundred is a pro? In LoL there are 300 players in challenger out of cca 300 000 players. And a lot of challenger players are not pro.

Vor 3 Tage
Oddo
Oddo

@dogaru alexandru do you know what top 1% is? Low immortal is already well into top 1%, or around 5.5k mmr those days. It is nowhere close to pros. And it is not like i can stay at this level for a long time. Achieved once, have not played dota for years now.

Vor 4 Tage
dogaru alexandru
dogaru alexandru

@Oddo top 1% on dota? how many million dollars have you earned from dota 2?

Vor 4 Tage
Sean Sossa
Sean Sossa

this was an amazingly informative video! it made me reflect on some of my bad habits that i never realized. thanks for the video!

Vor 3 Tage
Drecon84
Drecon84

There are more problems with predictions though. An expert might be able to correctly identify possible problems and possible solutions, but what happens is often more complex. For example: Marx correctly analyzed that workers were in an untenable position and he correctly (probably) predicted that if nothing would change, people might rise up. What he didn't predict was that we got unions, that gave workers a bit of power back, completely changing everything he was thinking about. In other words: predicting the future is really not feasible. You can identify problems and even think up possible scenarios, but there will always be factors you didn't think about. So it's not even really about practice, the question was just not reasonable I think.

Vor 14 Stunden
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME
+①③⓪⑤⑨④③④⑥⓪⑧WHATS'ApPME

☝️✍️☝️✍️✍️

Vor 9 Stunden
Jo
Jo

Magnus once said that he very rarely thinks more than 3 moves ahead. I always thought they would be planning the whole game on every move 🤯

Vor 9 Tage
Lysergide Daydream
Lysergide Daydream

Yeah man its all vibes

Vor 2 Tage
Nosho
Nosho

Given how many videos you've made so far that were inspired by or related to Thinking Fast And Slow, I was very much looking forward to you making one on expertise. Cheers!

Vor 6 Tage
Kyle Harwell
Kyle Harwell

Hi Derek, I am a cognitive psychologist and the final PhD student of K. Anders Ericsson (originator of the deliberate practice research). First of all, I wanted to commend you on providing an excellent, accessible summary of a complex and oft-misrepresented literature! I have given a number of talks on this exact topic and I can definitely learn a thing or two from your presentation style. Second, if anyone is interested in learning more about deliberate practice, expertise, and the myths surrounding them, I encourage you to check out an academic paper I published with a colleague in the online Journal of Expertise (Harwell, K. & Southwick, D. 2021. Beyond 10,000 hours: Addressing misconceptions of the expert performance approach. Journal of Expertise, 4(2) [link omitted, since I don't know if I can post it in Youtube comments]). Also, check out the whole issue, which is dedicated to the legacy of Ericsson's work across several fields of psychology.

Vor 16 Tage
Jayden Tan
Jayden Tan

@Catherine Bailey Thank you, you are a good-egg (my version of g factor) :3

Vor 2 Tage
Catherine Bailey
Catherine Bailey

@Jayden Tan G, or g factor, refers to general intelligence, thought to be the broad mental capacity that influences performance on cognitive ability measures.

Vor 2 Tage
Singularity Raptor
Singularity Raptor

@Mai Yenish It's not that one can't lie with statistics. It's about that book goes extreme with that idea and inflates it. You can lie with statistics but doesn't mean it's easy or can't be spotted. It also doesn't mean we can quote it whenever a study doesn't conform to our belief.

Vor 7 Tage
Mai Yenish
Mai Yenish

@Singularity Raptor "How to Lie With Statistics" Can't be debunked. Numbers can't be debunked. Statistics can't be debunked. Presentation of the numbers can be massaged. IE: Happy Birthday! You are 1 year older now, or should I say, you have increased your age by 10%!

Vor 8 Tage
Radhika Kadam
Radhika Kadam

I really need your explanation on why moving charges creates a magnetic field I have seen your previous vedio on this subject but it wasn't detailed. I will be thankful if you will elaborate this topic in one of your upcoming vedio.

Vor 5 Tage
Rasmus Linnemann
Rasmus Linnemann

Such a great video. I learn something new and interesting every time. Well spent 20 minutes on my end! :)

Vor 5 Tage
Anik Samiur Rahman
Anik Samiur Rahman

Thanks, Mr. Derek. Though I feel like I've grown out of most of your videos. Still, this is the best motivational video I've seen in many years.

Vor 8 Tage
AeroArduino
AeroArduino

Amazing Video as usual. I love deliberate practice. And I agree with you that when we look at someone practicing something it's like magic. Thanks for sharing.

Vor 7 Tage
Qwerty and Azerty
Qwerty and Azerty

As a graduate student, this hits home pretty hard. We spend countless hours on a project, only to get feedback once when a final paper is submitted for peer review. The feedback is neither timely nor frequent. And yet, you get to claim to be an expert in your field by the time your graduate.

Vor 15 Tage
yes
yes

the project isn't for learning, it's for assessment

Vor 13 Tage
Peter Quadarella
Peter Quadarella

@Random User no the video only addressed company recruiters, who are notoriously poor at their jobs for precisely the reason the video explains. Better companies allow people who actually work with the hired individuals to make hiring decisions, because they actually get feedback on their decisions.

Vor 15 Tage
Justin
Justin

@cecesoclean Most in my field definitely steer away from degrees. We want to see the actual experience involved with the large projects you've accomplished, which is why my buddy who only has a GED, is way more valuable in their eyes then someone with just some college completed.

Vor 15 Tage
Tony Lee
Tony Lee

Well even if you do get consistent instant feedback, that'd only make you an expert in writing papers in that field

Vor 15 Tage
Rick Regger
Rick Regger

@R is has nothing to do with being smart, at least i didnt understand it that way. if you think about sports it becomes obvious that you need much more then "smartness" many thousand hours outside of your comfortzone does need an iron will, patience and many more to become an expert. i only can talk about football (european) and esports where you can see that u dont have to be very smart to understand memorize the gamemechanics. the chess example works pretty well, its about to recognize important stuff which decides the outcome.

Vor 15 Tage

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