Stability Calculations (Boatbuilding / Tally Ho EP125)

  • Am Vor Monat

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    EPISODE 125

    This episode may not be for everyone - It is all about the basic theory of sailing boat stability, and the details of the stability calculations that we have done to ensure that Tally Ho floats properly to her designed waterline and maintains her original sailing characteristics.
    I’ve been back in the UK for a month and no physical work has been done on Tally Ho during that time, so this video is entirely dialogue and diagrams! However, this less glamorous work is extremely important for authenticity and sailing performance.

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    Music;

    Uptown - Topher Mohr and Alex Elena

    125. Stability Calculations (Boatbuilding / Tally Ho EP125)

Jørgen Rieck
Jørgen Rieck

Great video Leo. An idea: You could offer the 3D model of Tally Ho for sail so geeks like me could print their own little Tally Ho. It'd be awesome to have as a model on my desk :)

Vor Monat
Limits Edge Machine Works
Limits Edge Machine Works

I second

Vor 28 Tage
Sean Morgan
Sean Morgan

I would fucking love that

Vor Monat
Alan Good
Alan Good

The making of a fibreglass mould of the actual hull for manufacturing hulls for professional and amateur completion would be another idea. It might be frowned upon by the wooden boat purists but it could make Leo's dreams and ambitions more affordable and achievable to a number of his followers and perhaps be a source of income to fund his project and future adventures.

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Stephen Amarga
Stephen Amarga

are the plans or CAD free?

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Shadowgolem
Shadowgolem

100% agree with this one!!!!

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John Mooney
John Mooney

As a retired project manager and licensed Professional Engineer I appreciate your practice of utilizing experts advisors. Your associate, Jack, is another example of one of those experts. A shout out to Jack, please. Also, your graphical presentations were perfect. Thanks and well done. Cheers

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aserta
aserta

Refreshing to see actual boat building. Properly done, with math and knowledge.

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John Bower
John Bower

@janofb Yes there are many examples of how not to do things in that build :(

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Pfalzgraf
Pfalzgraf

@Mark Since Yaba is done by a pretty experienced crew AND not 100% rebuilt, I'm confident she'll be ok I do believe there's more going on behind the scenes than they show. Leo, being a boatbuilder himself knows and can show a load more of this than the layman owners of Yaba

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Peter Trolle Jakobsen
Peter Trolle Jakobsen

@Bob Dylan Easy now, all the seams on Yaba has been caulked properly by a professional. If not the boat would never float, there was a sad incident in Denmark a few years back, where a 60’ schooner sank because of faulty caulking taking the life of a young woman.

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calholli
calholli

@David Hopkins They are supersonic--- but if you shoot far enough, those projectiles go back to sub sonic; It's called the "transonic zone" -- and when it happens, you will have wild accuracy after that, because it nearly always causes the stabilized, spinning projectile (that spins as high as 300k RPM), to induce a wobble or tumble as it slows back below supersonic speeds.. People call it "hitting the wall"-- Because you can be shooting very accurately out to (just for example)- 700 yards or so, but then you push out to 730 yards, and all the sudden you have wildly different accuracy and can't hit the target at all, but maybe 1 out of 10 shots... Transonic zones are a hard limit on what rifles can do with any given projectiles.

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Chris Eiserman
Chris Eiserman

@Thomas Becker _"I believe he's making a sarcastic reference to SV Seeker."_ "Ding-Ding-Ding".........Winner!

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Thomas Davison
Thomas Davison

Finally, my weekend is complete! I can stop going through Leo withdrawals. I would think that these calculations are very important for racing.

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Luiz Schechter
Luiz Schechter

@Tom Smith The lighter and smaller a boat gets, the more important crew weight and position become. Tally Ho is neither.

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Tom Smith
Tom Smith

In racing, the crew is an important part of the ballast. Especially in smaller boats, you have to be constantly moving your body around to balance the boat. I guess it's less important for a larger boat like Tally Ho though.

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Luiz Schechter
Luiz Schechter

Essential to optimize seaworthiness. Tally Ho was not conceived as a racer, but as a cruiser. Racing performance is a lesser goal.

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John Mooney
John Mooney

Lol, I too look forward to his updates. Cheers

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Kevin T
Kevin T

any episode with your architectural cut out animations is solid content dont apologize. this was very informative and props for finding a way to get an episode out while on vacation i figured we would not see anything while you were gone.

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Dan O'Keefe
Dan O'Keefe

Agreed! He could do a whole series like that just explaining sailing physics and other nautical concepts the same way and get a lot of traction.

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R. Smith
R. Smith

As an aerospace engineer I found this a very well done explanation. Afterall, water and air are both fluids and this is fluid dynamics. Great you have a navel architect to verify everything, too. I'd like to see a similar presentation on the sails and rigging when the time is right. I've been a Patreon since you offered us that chance to support you and feel it is a worthwhile donation on my part. Keep up the good work.

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William Meredith
William Meredith

@Alec Lewis I am not a boat guy, though I love boats... In aircraft, we have incorporated from the factory a method for identifying design CG versus actual, thereby measuring deviation of the CG. I imagine it would be a simple matter to include a fixed mount point on the overhead for a plumb bob, and a set of scales on the floor to measure deviation from true. As Leo demonstrates a penchant for such it would doubtless come out looking classy and elegant! The high tech option would be to use a digital protractor to record the angles of two known places, one reflecting lateral angle, the other longitudinal angle. If you set the vessel true on the hard and recorded these angles, then put her in the water, and add ballast until you reach true.

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Alec Lewis
Alec Lewis

Question: can you verify the theoretical center of gravity in some kind of real world test once the boat is on the water?

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William Meredith
William Meredith

Alright, I'm NOT a Naval anything, but I am a nuts and bolts, knuckle dragging aircraft mechanic, and I know how we get our weight and balance, and before any of you architects or engineers speak up, if you think weight and balance is important for a boat or a ship, try airplanes! Weigh the thing from a measured set of points, calculate the moment of these points and the weight recorded at these moments and you have your center of gravity plus or minus five thousandths of an inch. WE DON"T GUESS! WE KNOW! It would work! Let me talk to my people and see if we could spring people and tooling to do this for you! All Leo would have to do is mention us, and I guarantee it would make a great episode!

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Edward Schmitt
Edward Schmitt

Hey-thank YOU I have no resources to contribute. People like you have kept this beautiful project going.

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BluesAlmighty
BluesAlmighty

Well, here's a concurring aerospace engineer and navel architect 😁👍🏼

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Kurt Werner
Kurt Werner

That was a really cool explanation. Many thanks to Jack for his hard work.

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Yalla Imshi
Yalla Imshi

I am a BIG Jack Gifford fan. He designed and oversaw the build of a new keel for my modern performance yacht. He was recommended to me by on of the worlds greatest yacht designers. Not only is he a great naval architect but a top bloke too! A really smart guy who will steer you through the complexities of yacht design and manufacture. I really cannot praise him enough. Very pleased to see him working with Leo. Top team!

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Peter Hall
Peter Hall

Stability of ships was a big area of research in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. The Royal Society contains quite a few documents relating to the issue which attracted some top drawer people of the day. Imagine working out a surface area of a hull without modern software. Newton's Principia (which dates from the 17th century) contains a calculation of the shape of minimal resistance of an object travelling in water. It is highly geometrical and essentially impenetrable to modern people (I know because I've tried) and I can recall a physicist solving the problem with modern techniqes and being absolutely stonkered to find that Newton was spot on.

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Elli P
Elli P

Oho! Very interesting! Speaking as a ludicrously top-heavy woman who's been mocked and ridiculed ever since she left school for her... um... high centre of gravity [10 stone, 5'6", NN-cup...☹️], I love the idea of being able to describe myself in pukka nautical terms as 'tender'. Also 'squishy'.😁

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richard power
richard power

Get some lead soled shoes and you'll be fine.

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L j
L j

I guess if your a AA cup..your very stiff😄😄

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Leif Vejby
Leif Vejby

:-D

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Danny Archer
Danny Archer

I love the paper modelling, Leo!

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NoiseMakerX
NoiseMakerX

It's real nice!

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Michael McLaren
Michael McLaren

Most sailors I know are also largely uneducated on this technical side of boat design. We just always assume the weight/center of gravity should be low as possible to keep the green-side down 😄. Thanks for the dope slap!

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roadie3124
roadie3124

@Schutt Rostig It depends on the sail material and the wind strength. Most non-sailors think that sails generate power from the wind pushing into them. That only works with some sails and is a very slow way of sailing. Most sails generate power from the wind flowing across the surface. They are effectively wings. They need to be in an aerofoil shape to generate lift. If you have heavy sails and the boat is completely upright, a very light breeze won't be enough to fill out the sail into its aerofoil shape. If the boat is heeling, then the weight of the sail makes it form an aerofoil shape and the tiniest breeze across the sail generates some lift.

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WaltWood
WaltWood

@Schutt Rostig I also did not agree that the boat had to heel to sail

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Schutt Rostig
Schutt Rostig

@Gottenhimfella Ok, that does make sense. So i understand there can be reasons to have the weight not as low as possible.

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Gottenhimfella
Gottenhimfella

@Schutt Rostig It's very much borne out in practice, when the breeze is just a few knots. Look at Olympic dinghies in light winds, the helm will be lying along the lee gunwhale, and a good way to get yelled at on a bigger boat in a competitive drifting race is to start to move towards the high side unless your job absolutely cannot be done from leeward. On boats of any size, gravity will cause the sails to drop to their cambered shape if there's 5-10 degrees of heel. Sitting bolt upright, the sails will lazily flog between opposite cambers, meaning that they can't develop enough drive to build up steerage way (essential for constant sail trim) or - just as important - to build the apparent wind which is the key to sailing in very light winds. It's a fragile process of bootstrapping, and even when the sea is dead flat (in which case shifting the crew to leeward might be enough), a certain leeward heel is essential.

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Daniel Webbon
Daniel Webbon

Schutt Rostig yeah I was confused on that point too. I know for the old J class boats the overhangs were so extreme because the waterline length was set but not length over all and by heeling over hard they’d increase the hull speed. But I don’t really get why, outside of that one context. you’d sail poorly in light wind with a stiffer boat.

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Lac Leman
Lac Leman

You know, Leo, you say you're a boatbuilder and a sailor at the beginning of every video, but you don't mention the fact that you're also a very good videographer. Don't be too modest. We wouldn't be watching these videos if you weren't so talented at creating fantastic new content every week, ...or two.

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Benters
Benters

I believe he's also a musician. Keeps that very quiet. Only mentioned it once in a very early video.

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Oleran
Oleran

He also presents some great drawings!

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scallen2112
scallen2112

Early last week, someone mentioned this series on a thread on The Hull Truth, and I looked it up. Over about a five-day period I have binge-watched almost all of the 125 episodes. The craftsmanship here is amazing, and the episodes are fun and educational. I am dealing with some of these calculations now as I figure out where to place batteries, fuel tanks, and etc. on an 18.5' fiberglass fishing boat I am rebuilding. I especially like the episode about using the Live Oak from Georgia. I live in Brunswick, and the Oak used for the USS Constitution (Old Ironsides) was cut from Gascoigne Bluff here on St. Simons Island. Definitely subscribed and hit the bell so I don't miss any.

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WestPacific Market Analytics
WestPacific Market Analytics

Leo, As you go forward into the interior design and mast design please continue to discuss this idea around centerlines as part of conversation. The more technical side of the final build is very interesting. Great stuff.

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wisedupearly
wisedupearly

Stiff boats also place extremely high loads on the sails and rigging.

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robin albert
robin albert

A very sound observation, hopefully your comments will help people prevent damage.

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Dirk Dhulst
Dirk Dhulst

When I was in Engineering School every student had to take two courses: Vector Statics & Vector Dynamics. This is basically what you are showing in this video. It has never failed to amaze me how useful the study of vectors would wind up being, and how often it comes up.

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Tom Brown
Tom Brown

Those details are part of the reason your channel continues to fascinate.

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Damian Hall
Damian Hall

Loved this episode.... What made me chuckle was how similar an approach I used in ascertaining the CoG for a very large rocket (Reliant Robin Space Shuttle - there's a vid on my channel somewhere). Dervied from this you can also ascertain the Inertia of the vehicle too, this is important in ascertaining whether it manouevres like a cow or like a ferret! In aeronatics we use the centre of Pressure Cp (opposed to the Centre of bouyancy). We used a Wind tunnel for this. Thereafter You have most (not all) of the data required to develop a simulator to characterise the flight of the vehicle, design it's thrust lines, mass/location of ballast, simulate failure, wind shear characteristics etc. etc. In a simliar fashion just like you are doing here etc. etc. Great Stuff Leo. ABSOLUTELY love your work! :)

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Geoffrey Stearns
Geoffrey Stearns

Excellent episode! It wasn't mentioned, but would you not want to position fuel and water tanks close to the longitudinal CG so that the longitudinal CG does not change much as you consume fuel and water? I am an aerospace engineer familiar with aircraft design, and this is a stability issue there. Don't know whether it's considered sensitive for small sailing craft.

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Douglas Frank
Douglas Frank

I'm not a sailor though I've always been interested in boats. I found all of this episode very educational so thank you.

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Deric Martel
Deric Martel

If you have a body of water around you even a small lake, buy yourself a small sailboat, 12-16 feet or so! Super easy to learn and so much fun, I had never sailed in my life bought a boat and just went out and had fun

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OnkelPeters
OnkelPeters

It’s safe to say that the construction of the Swedish ship Vasa (1628) lacked good calculations when it came to stability …

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Gerry James Edwards
Gerry James Edwards

They'd have loved Jack and his computer, back then.

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S J
S J

As did the English Mary Rose 1511-1545 😳

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runningray
runningray

I used to watch the Deadliest Catch and saw the episode when Capt. Sig was informed of the sinking of FV Destination and death of his friend. At the end it was determined that the boat had a bit too many cages high up and they had iced and moved the center of gravity so far up that the boat overturned and sank.

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clive ramsbotty
clive ramsbotty

@J Rose Ah okay, thanks

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J Rose
J Rose

@clive ramsbotty There was a sister ship of the same construction & design. Simple stability tests (moving weights on deck) showed the actual margin of stability was far smaller than originally planned. The expected icing rate, combined with the larger/heavier pots made the math impossible to contradict.

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Apollo
Apollo

@clive ramsbotty Why would they need to, the ICE MELTED WHEN IT SANK

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clive ramsbotty
clive ramsbotty

thanks that's interesting. so they managed to locate the wreckage and reach that conclusion?

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Leonardo Willi
Leonardo Willi

I believe that also prompted Sig to have the Northwestern surveyed and a new stability study that prompted changes in his gear load.

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malakai651
malakai651

As always having an expert on hand is an excellent idea, he certainly knows his stuff.

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Quietwarf 101
Quietwarf 101

I can’t believe it’s been 125 episodes. Love your show. Best channel on YouTube.

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R. P.
R. P.

Important part of re-building TallyHo… do not underestimate the math involved in this kind of project. Excellent as always TallyHo crew ✊

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Frank Stocker
Frank Stocker

200 years ago Herreshoff & Fife made all these calculations with pencil & paper, just shows have clever these guys were.

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Carl Van Den Berg
Carl Van Den Berg

They had slide rules too...who made those?

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Thomas Becker
Thomas Becker

Something about apes and typewriters....

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984francis
984francis

I've done complex mass property studies with pencil and paper of axial compressor and turbine assemblies (whirling speed analysis). Just before computers took the graft away. It gets really tough when calculating the stiffness of each chunk, before the days of finite element analysis.

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Bridget Castle
Bridget Castle

Unbelievable how this was all done without the benefit of modern tech!

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Billy Whizz
Billy Whizz

What a brilliant explanation, so clear and good use of visuals.

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Ben Munday
Ben Munday

We are really privilaged to have this level of detail and engineering for us more ignorant yachtsmen. Another quality video. thank you!

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Eric Francis
Eric Francis

Absolutely fascinating! Love it when you go into the technical details of boatbuilding and sailing.

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Andrew Carter
Andrew Carter

Love this! The serious problem solving of boat building is so great to watch. In my opinion, I prefer this content to just montages of some work being done. The lofting episodes were so great to set up the framing episodes, can’t wait to see progress after this.

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Gordon Brooks
Gordon Brooks

The professor at his best, helping even a dunce, like me, to understand just a bit of this stuff.

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George Woodzell
George Woodzell

Welcome back, Leo! This was a fascinating explanation of the charcteristics of sailing vessels. Very well done (as always.)

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Bill Gargan
Bill Gargan

Before 3D Modeling, like in the 60’s we’d use a Planimeter to come up with cross sections, displacement calls. Then we’d do Weight andMoment calls.

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Dennis Weatherly
Dennis Weatherly

The narration combined with the moving drawings did a fantastic job of explaining the concepts you shared. Excellent work!

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Marty Schlosser
Marty Schlosser

Extremely informative and interesting info to hear, Leo! Thanks for sharing it with us, and I'm happy that your visit to the UK went well.

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Daniel Gilloon
Daniel Gilloon

Opening shot looked very professional with an interesting, warm background and terrific lighting. Good editing with the modeling shots. Hats off to the whole video crew.

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Ivy Isle
Ivy Isle

Can't wait to see you crack on with the build, this is such a great series

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Matthew Sellers
Matthew Sellers

I was told years ago (probably before much of the 3d modelling) that, at least initially, boats rarely sat exactly on their designed waterline. It may be that the ballast approximation on the original drawing was intentional to allow fine-tuning later.

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ronanwalsh22
ronanwalsh22

Great to see how the physics of sailing boats compare with aircraft design. Great work guys!

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Robert England
Robert England

You presented this brilliantly! I especially like your reference drawings accompanying the explanation. Well done - again!!

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philip Brailey
philip Brailey

Now I am happy, seeing another episode with Leo and Tally Ho is great therapy to start a working week. Thank you!

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Doug Wray
Doug Wray

THANK YOU for this! Definitely understandable and well-presented, especially the pinned ship and cg/cb markers - brilliant.

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Douglas Rogers
Douglas Rogers

Would be great to see a model of Tally Ho tested in a towing tank - perhaps the Stevens Institute one at Hobokan New Jersey could work - this was where the first Americas cup hulls were tested .

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Roger Bayzand
Roger Bayzand

Excellent program Leo, I can see my dear old Dad bent over his drawing board at Laurent Giles working out those calculations with a slide rule.

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R P
R P

As a professional builder, I found this to be extremely interesting. So much more than most people realize translates between building a floating body and a land bound one. Great video Leo!

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Doug Wray
Doug Wray

Your naval architect is solid as stone! LOVE to see all this detailed effort - Tally Ho will live for a thousand years!

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Nomad5d
Nomad5d

As an aerospace engineer, I found this to be an excellent discussion about sailboat design.

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oldwillie313
oldwillie313

Absolutely great video! Great explanation of the principals. I'm glad that the balance of the boat worked out so well for you and that there were no surprises. It's amazing to me how Albert Change and his contemporaries figured this stuff out manually 112 years ago!

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Normand Landry
Normand Landry

A great layman's explanation of sailboat physics. Thanks Leo.

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Paul Boden
Paul Boden

Fascinating. I'm curious how much theory Albert Strange applied, versus gut feeling and a good eye.

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Bob Hunter
Bob Hunter

I would guess just about as much as today. Naval Architecture was an old profession even 112 years ago. The only differences being they would have done it all by hand and not computer, and they would have had a lot more experience designing sailing vessels.

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Benjamin Uranga
Benjamin Uranga

Superbly presented as always. Thank you for furthering my education!

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Colin Sutherland
Colin Sutherland

Excellent video Leo. Took me back to when I was doing my mechanical engineering degree in the late 1970s and we shared some of our classes with the Naval Architects who in those days before widespread computer aided design were learning how to do those calculations the hard way, using calculus to determine the areas and volumes of sections of the hull. Nowadays the tools make lighter work of the lifting but the thinking is a real as ever.

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J Rabb
J Rabb

Leo, your didactic skills are outstanding! Thank very much.

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Stanley Shostak
Stanley Shostak

Really interesting and practical lesson on physics!

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Alan Wooldridge
Alan Wooldridge

As a civil / structural engineer loved the explanation just missed the "every couple have their moment" quote.

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D McMullen
D McMullen

I hope while you were home I hope you got to see your lady friend, Checka, I think was her name? Anyway, I hope you two are still together and everything is well. I miss her in your videos. She made it feel more like a home/family project and not a work job.

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Diggi Dirk
Diggi Dirk

challenge: rewatch the entire series before 126 comes out

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Utahdropout
Utahdropout

Very interesting Leo. Great to see what is involved in making a vessel sea worthy. I'm a flyer and we are always concerned with weight and balance of the airplane. Obviously, the same concerns are at play in an ocean vessel only in rather different ways. Good to see real professionals at work. Cheers

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Benters
Benters

For "center of buoyancy", read "center of pressure". Glad he doesn't have to venture into the thrust and drag vectors.

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Brad Fick
Brad Fick

If I ever get into boating, I'm going to appreciate watching all your videos and learning so much even more.

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Nigel Prendergast
Nigel Prendergast

I really enjoyed that, thanks. I've built some small boats where all that work is done by a designer, and any changes were done by instinct and experiment. it's great to get a workman like perspective on the theory.

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Peter Caras
Peter Caras

I'm sure this was figured in but besides internal lead and tankage, ground tackle can play a big part in proper trim.

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Jim McDonald
Jim McDonald

Thanks Leo, I was beginning to get Tally Ho withdrawals. I binged the whole series again, but in the end it doesn't compensate for the new fresh video, which is a remarkable topic.

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Nikki Newman
Nikki Newman

Your family must be so proud of you. What a pleasure it is to see someone recognize the value of something from the past and care enough about it, to try to restore it in both function and beauty. Your illustrations are a great enhancement to explaining difficult concepts. Congratulations.

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Derelict Machine
Derelict Machine

Would be absolutely fantastic when you're done to have a 3D-scan of the boat so that I can print it out!

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lespr52
lespr52

One of the best video that you have done. Go to college Nav Engineering. You will turn out one of the best. Never is to late. Your further explanation of both centers in a vessel was excellent. You are a perfectionist. Good job

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ReAnimate
ReAnimate

Beautiful stuff. Love the hand drawn visual elements

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Chris Halstead
Chris Halstead

Geeky stuff normally makes me sleepy, but this was GREAT!! Thank you 🙏

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Leonardo Willi
Leonardo Willi

Very interesting discussion that was perfect for me as a non-techy marine engineer. Obviously of vital importance in her stability but this put some words and principals to it and how it's done. This was way easier to understand than the "lining off" of the hull for planks.

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James Little
James Little

Most interesting and informative - well done Leo. I, like most uneducated sailors, thought lower center of gravity was best.

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Ross Arthur
Ross Arthur

Brilliant. Love this kind of detail, always been very interested in naval engineering

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madrew2003
madrew2003

Are you planning on doing any inclining experiments to validate the computer modeling? This was a nice revist of the elective Naval Architecture class I took in my ME studies. Back in the late 80's the computer support wasn't as polished as what Jack is using. We did a WWII Liberty Ship as a project and doing all the analysis was pretty laborious! Great job as always!

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Daff. Wallace
Daff. Wallace

Love your work and practical explanations, another great video as usual. Greetings from Australia!

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Dan Brownell Fuzzy
Dan Brownell Fuzzy

The next Tally Ho restoration a hundred years from now will feature wood welding and anti grav lifting.

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Alexander Menzies
Alexander Menzies

@Jim Parsons I'm seeing plenty of horses around still. Did you mean powered flight to first spacecraft (Sputnik) in 54 years?

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krvnjrcbs
krvnjrcbs

No

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Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons

@barnett25 who's to say. We humans when from horse to spaceship in little over a hundred years if that. No one can fathom the leaps and bounds we make in the next hundred.

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Jim Parsons
Jim Parsons

I am thinking plasma thrusters.

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barnett25
barnett25

@Paul Ohlstein Agreed. I can't imagine that battery, motor, and charging technology issues won't be so much improved by then that it would be absurd to choose fossil fuel.

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jim jim
jim jim

I learned a lot in this episode, you can explain things very well in layman's terms. Up up and forward.

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Papa Wheelie
Papa Wheelie

Fascinating stuff. Having had mostly powerboats in my lifetime, it's nice to hear these principles discussed in a way that has shed light on the character of each vessel's memories. Some are rather a handful and others just seemed like a breeze to operate. Well presented!

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John Loizos
John Loizos

This week, Leo challenges his viewers' dedication by going through a spreadsheet with his "weights and ballance accountant". 😁 Keep it up Leo! Welcome back. Great to see those 3D models.

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Matt Evans-Koch
Matt Evans-Koch

Thank you Leo for the update. Good to see you back. Enjoyed the explanation on determining the various aspects that affect the sailing characteristics. Have a productive week ahead.

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cuzinevil1
cuzinevil1

In 100 years, I hope there will be someone who loves Tally Ho as much as Leo does now. Good catch with the fuel tanks.

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Lg Spare
Lg Spare

Question: It sounds like two major changes - lighter rigging and more external ballast - would both tend to lower the CG and result in a stiffer boat. What changes are you making that counteract those two so the handling of the restored TH is similar to the original? Loved the nerdy details.

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mark ayers
mark ayers

Unless he plans to counter with more sail area 😉

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Gary Seaman
Gary Seaman

Thank you for sharing some of the science behind ship building. Very interesting.

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AustNRail
AustNRail

Impressed with your LGI (Leo Generated Images) in your explanation.

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jon massey
jon massey

Very much enjoyed yours and Jack's detailed explanation... got most of it first time but I did have to rewind on a few occasions to get it into my layman's brain. Hope you had a nice visit back home Leo as friends and family are everything in these trying times. 🇬🇧

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Solsken Group LLP
Solsken Group LLP

Learned a lot from this video, Leo. Well done!

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Building Our DayDream
Building Our DayDream

Fantastic and worth the wait. Glad you got a chance to recharge Leo. These technical videos are welcome. Your mix is spot on and captivating.

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Keith Brinch
Keith Brinch

Thanks a Stack Leo and Jack, what a Wonderfully Informative vidclip. Has given me a Lot More understanding about just what you are trying to achieve, seeing it all in 3D sure gives one a lot more insight .... Very Best to All, thanks too for all the invaluable input from Jack .... Cheers to You, Jack and the Team from New Zealand

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David Elliott
David Elliott

Great video, I personally really enjoy the insight into how things work the way they do and engineering adjustments that can greatly change performance characteristics. Thank you.

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jeffhreid
jeffhreid

This was splendid. Very interesting and informative

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Robert Hodge
Robert Hodge

Going over the homework never hurts. Welcome Back Tally Ho's! Wind at your backs always.

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Jacques Icard
Jacques Icard

Thanks Leo, that's a brilliant explanation and if I had known all this when I was young, I probably would have sailed differently! ❤️❤️❤️

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Gordon Clark
Gordon Clark

That was really interesting Leo. Nice to see you back from your trip. Listening as to how calculations are done on a computer made me wonder how these were done in the early days of sail?

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richard zeeman
richard zeeman

Fascinating description. When I was required to get my forklift license, we had to learn about the stability triangle and how moving the centre of gravity outside of this triangle means tipping over your forklift.

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Richard Reis
Richard Reis

I love the explanation, this nuts and bolts (technical) exploration of the engineering of boat building really perks my interests

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Davey Leslie
Davey Leslie

Loved the technical talk. Not a sailor or boatbuilder, but am fascinated by the technical aspects of this rebuild. It's been a bit like taking an online lecture. Just excellent!

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MadMulberry
MadMulberry

Thanks for the interesting look at some of the more technical aspects of the design. I found it fascinating. I'd love more of this sort of content in the future.

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ladamyre
ladamyre

Finding it hard to wait to see those cover boards fitted. That deck is gonna be a beautiful thing to behold, especially with that hatch cover you've saved on top of it. Still this update on the new "weights and measures" of the rebuild was yet another example of why I love to watch your classes on wooden boat technology.

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Kadover
Kadover

Welcome back Leo! Great to see things back in swing, and very glad you were able to get some much needed down time!

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bruder bro
bruder bro

Great video! Love the very clear diagrams as well. I now see the advantage of having "loose" internal ballast as you can be there at the end of the build and just position where and how much inside until the boat "sits" right. It is really hard to do that before hand, but once you are in the water, it is much simpler.

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Daemon Wolf
Daemon Wolf

Glad you caught your break. It's always good to determine your next course of action so I am looking forward to see this continue.

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ukulelefatman
ukulelefatman

Great visual explanation. I had a hell of a time getting my head wrapped around the concept when getting my Masters License. Wish you were around then Leo, you're diagrams would have saved me hours in the books. : )

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0623kaboom
0623kaboom

@constantinos schinas american text books ... they werent thinking ... they were regurgitating ... that is the difference

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constantinos schinas
constantinos schinas

Hard to believe there was no diagrammes in the books. What were they thinking?

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