Kosaku Yamada - Japanese Silhouettes

  • Am Vor year

    Gamma1734Gamma1734

    Dauer: 07:38

    Kosaku Yamada (山田 耕筰 1886 - 1965) was a Japanese composer and conductor.
    After studying at the Tokyo Music School, he left Japan for Germany where he enrolled in the Berlin Hochschule and learnt composition under Max Bruch and Karl Leopold Wolf and piano under Carl August Heymann-Rheineck, before returning to Japan.
    Yamada left about 1,600 pieces of music. Especially, songs (Lieder) amount to 700 pieces of music excluding songs for schools, municipalities and companies.
    As a conductor, Yamada made an effort to introduce many orchestral works to Japan. He was the first performer in Japan of Debussy's Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune, Dvořák's Symphony No. 9, Gershwin's An American in Paris, Mosolov's Iron Foundry, Sibelius' Finlandia, Shostakovich's Symphony No. 1, Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau, and Wagner's Siegfried Idyll.
    0:08 Ohayo
    1:20 Konnichi-wa
    2:14 Konban-wa
    4:41 Ozasuim
    I like the fact that the tempi and "drive" of the pieces fit to the corresponding time of the day. The last piece has meditating qualities even.

annulær solformørkelse
annulær solformørkelse

Catching up on the videos, this collection is really cool! Thanks for sharing ;)

Vor year
sergio fcastillo
sergio fcastillo

This one is very cool!

Vor year
Pentameron
Pentameron

I enjoyed his Symphony in F major and he deserves more recognition. For some reason I'm reminded of the first time I listened to Bridge's 3 Miniature Pastorales.

Vor year
Gamma1734
Gamma1734

I think i literally forgot it. Maybe worth a shot for the guess the score group haha

Vor year
Pentameron
Pentameron

By the way, which work is your profile picture now from?

Vor year
John Clovis A. Verano
John Clovis A. Verano

Nice Music and Performance. Absolutely Beautiful.

Vor year
Ian Patrick McHugh
Ian Patrick McHugh

Greetings! I'm a philosopher with a great love for, and interest in, music and music culture. I am delighted that so many composers who have been traditionally regarded in classical music history and musicology as inferior, minor, or of no historical/artistic importance, have now found new audiences and growing interest and popularity through social media platforms and Youtube especially. This is a new development in the history of music which I believe has profound implications and possible ramifications for our understanding of the history of music, the way by which we assess the quality of a work of music (or the creativity and/or significance of its creator), the way we experience music, and the evolution of the relationship between creators, musical sound, and listeners. Your channel is a notable contributor of this trend of making forgotten works of music available to wider audiences than their composers ever experienced in their lifetimes, and is thus also a contributing and motivating factor in what seems to me to be an important, new chapter in music. Would you be willing to engage in a discussion regarding what got you to start and maintain your channel, what influenced the selection of the music involved on your channel, the responses that you have gotten from your listeners, and your own thoughts regarding what you are doing and why you are doing it regarding your channel? This discussion may result in my writing of some essays on this complex topic for publication or as a series of blog posts. Thank you very much for your time!

Vor year
Gamma1734
Gamma1734

Hey! Thanks for this complete and interesting comment. First of all, since I am german, my english is not perfect. Generally, I am open to such a discussion in form of comments here or messages via Messenger of WhatsApp etc. The reason I started the channel is because after my finished master studies I had a lot of free time, and because I always found imslp fascinating, kind of as a playground of so much untouched music. I was bored to hear the same Beethoven Sonatas and Chopin Ballades in every concert over and over again. Sometimes they would play a Ligeti, if they are super fancy. But never late romantic piece, for example Valses etc., see the channel. The responses were almost always positive I think, also because I am just making the videos and writing my thoughts to them in the description sometimes. So I am not sponsored, I don't get a penny for it or something like that. In the beginning it was very exciting, because whenever I played a concert, 30 people or so would listen to me playing, but now hundreds listen to my performances. That's a part I don't emphasize here, because the main focus should really be on making all the forgotten pieces more known, but to me it is also an exercise in sight-reading honestly. I have been quite good at sight-reading, so I developed myself more and more into the direction where it was too time-consuming to actually practice pieces for weeks. I would then rather get some imslp piece and play it for 2 days; although there would be still lots of errors, I would think that it is fine and any further learning would only improve it by small amounts. I am not ashamed by that, since I am by definition an amateur. People here I think sometimes forget that I am sitting 8 hours everyday in the office and think about mathematical formulas. I am really lucky if there are 2 hours even in the evening I can spend for Youtube. Last year I sometimes could play and upload 12 pieces in one day. I'd love to do that now, believe me. More than thinking of mathematical formulas often. Also I always like to change my search algorithms. I started with the Caprice category in Imslp, and basically downloaded all 550 (at that time) pieces, and played them, to decide if I like them or not. I normally only upload music when I believe that I would enjoy to listen to it at some later point too. My own thoughts are, that now 2 big problems arised, namely my terrible internet connection, not allowing for live streams, and the keyboard I use, not allowing to play any faster and more virtuosic piece. So, I already played "kind of" virtuosic pieces, but I would like to spread out in direction of Kapustin Etude and Alkan Etude difficulty. For some of this pieces I already studied a lot. These are an exception, because there are pieces i just WANT to be able to play, everybody probably knows that feeling. In the end, instead of playing all these pieces alone at my house, which I would have done anyway, youtube was a "quick idea" i once had to let everybody participate in this exploration. There are almost 500 videos now after shortly over a year, and I think it's still working so good because almost everybody who subscribed knew what they are interested in, so there is basically no hate or nonsense here, which I really appreciate. Live streams would be so good to critize my playing, because I want to and need to improve. Also I can exchange knowledge with professionals and interested amateurs via streams, but also with social media, which is just great to find friends who are also passionately interested in music. In real life I have nobody right now I could talk about piano playing.

Vor year
UCJ5Pn3Q5O0wcbsQuvrA0p2w
UCJ5Pn3Q5O0wcbsQuvrA0p2w

That’s a lot of works.

Vor year
thenameisgsarci
thenameisgsarci

Great, you're doing anime music now. Nah jk. XD

Vor year

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