ENGLISH SPEECH | EMMA WATSON: Gender Equality (English Subtitles)

  • Am Vor 4 years

    English SpeechesEnglish Speeches

    Learn English with Emma Watson. She is a British actress and model whose most notable role is that of Hermione Granger in the Harry Potter film series. Watch Emma's speech in a special event for UN Women’s HeForShe campaign - Watch with big English subtitles.

    The HeForShe campaign is a solidarity movement for gender equality which calls upon men and boys to help end the persisting inequalities faced by women and girls globally.

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English Speeches
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Vor 3 years
Sankari Selvaraj
Sankari Selvaraj

Bro can you please say where the conference is going on please...

Vor year
Икромжон Юсупжанов
Икромжон Юсупжанов

Ok👏👏

Vor year
MGMP BAHASA INGGRIS BANTUL
MGMP BAHASA INGGRIS BANTUL

Thank you for your kindness 🙏🙏🙏

Vor year
I Y I Edit MASTER
I Y I Edit MASTER

@ahmed najraan alright geese 0_0 but don't u think that's a little rude

Vor year
EUGENY EUGENY
EUGENY EUGENY

RUSSIAN SUBS -???? )))))))

Vor year
Kakada Kong
Kakada Kong

I just want to cry about how she is able to express what she wanted to say while I am at the corner hiding myself. I am so proud of her.

Vor 3 years
uniter forever
uniter forever

@Corry Burton she isn't fcking doing it for money, she means each and every word. Stop being jealous of people gosh

Vor 4 Monate
jose a
jose a

But God has a greater message...live holy lives and you will experience a glimpse of joy and peace of eternal life here. The world cannot offer this and it choses not to know of it. Who will be our master?

Vor 7 Monate
D Bx
D Bx

U need trump

Vor 8 Monate
Kris D
Kris D

@Online Doctor Seuss Yes, I am me to tell you to stop! I have every right.

Vor year
Peacekeeper
Peacekeeper

Just know that she never looks at a paper... it comes from her heart. This is a speech

Vor 2 years
King Ali
King Ali

Wow!.... that's​ sooo impressive!

Vor 2 Monate
Antje VG
Antje VG

Komt da tegen

Vor 4 Monate
Antje VG
Antje VG

DIDI❤️

Vor 4 Monate
Tecy-i Khawlhring
Tecy-i Khawlhring

I love her accent and her voice is sweet and comforting

Vor 3 years
Linda Kartika Sari
Linda Kartika Sari

@titi popa u r amazing, i read it all and i really love how u speak, your words so great and so clear. Hopefully everyone in the world will understand soon too.

Vor 2 Monate
Polar Tanaka
Polar Tanaka

Sounds like she's going to cry

Vor 4 Monate
Sarthak Sachdeva
Sarthak Sachdeva

Yeah good accent

Vor 4 Monate
pOtAtO Directioner 💚💙
pOtAtO Directioner 💚💙

@Hakil Abdulla talking about yourself?

Vor 4 Monate
SungDripWoo
SungDripWoo

Watch kunoichi shrinemaiden if u like gender equality also knight ingrid💪🏻

Vor 5 Monate
angel
angel

As a member of my school's journalism team, I'm tasked to write about what I felt about Gender Inequality. I have watched many videos about feminism and this is one of the best speeches I've ever seen! Well done, Hermione Granger!

Vor 3 years
Beyblade lovers
Beyblade lovers

@angel suggestions are for lifetime 🥰

Vor 10 Monate
angel
angel

@Beyblade lovers thanks for the input but that assignment was two years ago! :)

Vor 10 Monate
qwerty ytrewq
qwerty ytrewq

@Beyblade lovers i guess no, i just decided express my opinion, that's it

Vor 10 Monate
Beyblade lovers
Beyblade lovers

I think you should write what you see and feel for that

Vor 10 Monate
qwerty ytrewq
qwerty ytrewq

@angel go away please

Vor 11 Monate
Bhavana
Bhavana

" The more I have spoken about feminism, the more I have realized that fighting for women's rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating" - EMMA WATSON Whole speech was inspiring but this one hit me hard.

Vor 10 Monate
Alan Zhang
Alan Zhang

She’s amazing. She’s as brilliant as Hermione as well as Emma herself.

Vor year
hari hari riri
hari hari riri

The moment you realized that Emma voice was actually trembling not because of nervous but because the strong amount of her eager to start slapping world with fact ✨✨✨

Vor year
Elmer Tango-an
Elmer Tango-an

*Emma Watson*

Vor year
Rahim Mottammal
Rahim Mottammal

British beauty Emma. Well said.

Vor 3 years
D Bx
D Bx

With american alpha trump

Vor 8 Monate
Arthur Barber
Arthur Barber

France gave to her the breathe of life. Elle esters toujours francaise

Vor 10 Monate
I Y I Edit MASTER
I Y I Edit MASTER

@C D yasssss

Vor year
𝘳𝘪𝘹𝘥𝘩𝘪
𝘳𝘪𝘹𝘥𝘩𝘪

Just Jay no she just lived in France for some years and was born in France but she is British

Vor year
The Best channel With Md Shahnawaz
The Best channel With Md Shahnawaz

Assalamualaikum

Vor year
Pandr Dogypower
Pandr Dogypower

"When I was 18." Me: "Harry Potter!"

Vor 3 years
Woman
Woman

What she 18 while giving the speech?

Vor Monat
Sean's Swamp
Sean's Swamp

LMAO

Vor 3 Monate
SungDripWoo
SungDripWoo

Watch kunoichi shrinemaiden if u like gender equality also hell knight ingrid💪🏻

Vor 5 Monate
tHE cREATER malayalam
tHE cREATER malayalam

When i was 15

Vor 6 Monate
Mewgulf are soulmates, Periodt.
Mewgulf are soulmates, Periodt.

This speech hits so hard, being a feminist myself i’ve had many instances in life where people think i am anti man or people say you are not gonna have a happy married life. Don’t say things like that because males suffer too and I always felt that if i as a human wants to have equal rights and be treated equally then what is wrong with that? I have never said male don’t suffer or have it all in life but after hearing so much i stopped identifying myself as a feminist because i was uncomfortable of the way people would judge me based on my opinions but this speech changed my view and i am so thankful to Emma for such a powerful speech.

Vor year
PR:-
PR:-

@jack johnson Come to India once or any other backward country ,u will surely get the real definition of feminsm.. Here mainly in villages there're so many judgements and social boundaries are there for females only (not men). And when talking about privilages or any special attention as feminism ,it's the man made theory.. Females need special attention during pregnancy and periods coz these are sensitive things ..and a real man values these ,making somone feel special is not a matter of shame but a matter of love and respect I think .. yeah we can say that there are some pseudo feminist who misuse the term feminist but not all, and for them u men literally get a chance to misuse the term "feminist.. Infact in some comments I have read that- in some situations, if mens are unable to argue or justify their comments against any female issues with a female then they spontaneous reply with the particular word "pseudo feminist" which is a worst trend that men're following .. and not all men are good either.. feminist word arises only due to lack of opportunities for females in this male dominant world.. You're just defining "man" made theory not the actual thing for which feminist word arises..

Vor 2 Monate
jack johnson
jack johnson

@PR:- what bothers men the most about feminism is the hypocritsy Feminism has never been about equal rights its always been about special treatment and privileges for woman and girls

Vor 3 Monate
Sean's Swamp
Sean's Swamp

:(

Vor 3 Monate
PR:-
PR:-

@ego this's the mentality of most men which emma was trying to say. It's only the basic rights and equality as a human being we need (irrespective of our gender) nothing else . And this thing bothers most of men.

Vor 4 Monate
Yogita Wankhade
Yogita Wankhade

She is an inspiration for those who says they can't do anything and such a slap on face to those who says girls are weak and can't do anything . Love you Emma 🙏🙏

Vor 11 Monate
Harsh Vardhan Rastogi
Harsh Vardhan Rastogi

thank you for this comment btw i wanted to make sure that llots and lots of boys support girls i am ashamed of being a boy as.............. bro being sexist/ racist is another thing but counting those who help girls stregthen is way too wrong i have a experience about this so i wrote

Vor 11 Monate
Harsh Vardhan Rastogi
Harsh Vardhan Rastogi

bruh

Vor 11 Monate
Mukhlisa Abdurasulova
Mukhlisa Abdurasulova

She has a confidence! She really truly be an ideal for every single girl in the world. I love her so much and only wish the dreams of her come true! I've learned how to live from her! Thanks Emma for being this world 💕

Vor 2 years
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us."

Vor year
Jess Rawat
Jess Rawat

LOVE Emma she's an inspiration

Vor 4 years
Jr Stinger
Jr Stinger

@Kris D Please just stop

Vor year
Kris D
Kris D

she's an actress, they all act so they can get paid

Vor year
WHITEMOUSE
WHITEMOUSE

She is only mine........😠😡

Vor year
Rocky Since 2004
Rocky Since 2004

@Matias Durán WTF this language is?? 😟😟😟

Vor 2 years
Huyen Nguyen Van
Huyen Nguyen Van

I'm learning English and I love Emma Waston so much I love this video and this channel too! Thank you so much, Emma. I am so proud of you because this topic made me cry, I support you. I learn a lot of vocabulary in this video. I thank you again.

Vor 2 years
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us."

Vor year
Hermione Granger
Hermione Granger

That was an awesome speech! I love Emma Watson and how she stands up for what's right, just like Hermione standing up for house elves! She's so brilliant in her speeches, and I'm so happy she decided to stand up for women.

Vor year
Shambhavi Chaturvedi
Shambhavi Chaturvedi

She felt every word that left her lips. Eloquent truly

Vor 2 years
Rice & Shine Show
Rice & Shine Show

She is inspiring ! love her message!

Vor year
ANONYMOUS AK
ANONYMOUS AK

Am i the only who is feeling shivering in Her voice.

Vor year
dream girl
dream girl

@Joohwangie ジ True said!

Vor year
Kris D
Kris D

nope

Vor year
Joohwangie ジ
Joohwangie ジ

She’s nervous..because its kinda a topic people hate. Because some people who hate feminism don’t realise that they are hating females. I so agree that men are taught to be tough..men are taken as strong. But we need to realise that they are also humans.. But same with females, they are taken as the opposite. They are taken as weak. Why can’t we just agree that both genders are same. Both genders are nothing without each other. I like Emma Watson because she says that all genders deserve to be treated nicely. And guys, she isn’t being selfish. She’s just talking about it because she has been sexualised a lot of times by the media as a kid

Vor year
Joohwangie ジ
Joohwangie ジ

@Wafa Sarfraz or maybe you’re the only one feeling not

Vor year
Dr SotoFreak
Dr SotoFreak

It's because she talks so much that she cannot breathe

Vor year
Ruby and Juno
Ruby and Juno

She is such an amazing, intelligent woman. Such a powerful speech!

Vor year
Ruby and Juno
Ruby and Juno

@Online Doctor Seuss I completely agree. The problem with those feminists hating men and 'wishing they were dead' as such, is that the rest of us are outed for wishing the same upon the male society - when we clearly don't. Being a feminist should be about fighting for the rights of both genders, but in a society that is still so divided, many people seem to be looking for an excuse to spread more hate and violence (when the objective had originally been against the latter). As a teenager and a girl in my last years of secondary school, I have seen countless examples of the struggles both men and women have to face every day. This has to change. Emma Watson has shown pure bravery and outstanding loyalty to both sexes in her speech. He for she has protected the lives of so many, whether it be spreading awareness or raising money to help victims of rape and sexism. We need more people like her to step up and help change the world. (Sorry if this is bad, wanted to reply but i'm terrible with words....)

Vor year
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us."

Vor year
Devon Phillips-Kayes
Devon Phillips-Kayes

This is the most powerful and inspiring speech I have ever listened to ❤️

Vor 7 Monate
Alphy Renita
Alphy Renita

So inspirational & well said What you said is absolutely true

Vor year
Samrat Dey
Samrat Dey

Loved your speech. No change takes over night, everything takes time. I hope, if not this generation, then in our grand-childrens' generation they will see her words becoming reality. Amen ❤️

Vor 2 Monate
T.Winks2
T.Winks2

This is a very good speech. I’ve read the full transcript of this speech and it’s even more impressive, especially coming from a young woman as her. Good role model she is.

Vor year
Sean's Swamp
Sean's Swamp

yes

Vor 3 Monate
Anika Tasnim
Anika Tasnim

"No country in the world can yet say that they have achieved gender equality."--- what can be more shameful than this line for humanity.

Vor 9 Monate
A.Amrita Varshini
A.Amrita Varshini

Emma is truly a gem. Every word seems to come from her heart, she is not one of those "pseudo feminists". She is a true feminist. Each word of hers was 100% true. You are my inspiration. P. S. I love her accent❤

Vor year
My Edit's world
My Edit's world

Yeah

Vor year
sylvia
sylvia

i'm practicing my accent but i lowkey started crying, her speech was really touched and emotional

Vor year
SM
SM

Really?

Vor year
Anshnu
Anshnu

I’m getting goosebumps with each of her sentence ... really felt something 😃

Vor year
Selene Hill
Selene Hill

I really admire Emma Watson. Even when she plays Hermione Granger, Emma is always beautiful, confident and strong. Her speech and voice touched me. She is my inspiration. Emma is a perfect example of a strong, talented and independent woman.

Vor 2 years
Niraj Parekh
Niraj Parekh

To be very honest I have been searching the channel on Youtube to make my language more fluent. After going through many different channels and English Mentors. I finally reached the ENGLISH SPEECH miraculously. This channel provides the simplest English speeches with the Subtitle may ease the learners more effectively.. Keep it up ENGLISH SPEECHS you are doing great job.

Vor 2 years
Niraj Parekh
Niraj Parekh

@English Speeches Thanks..I am grateful to your lovey comment..keep uploading new content. Especially Vocabulary

Vor 2 years
English Speeches
English Speeches

Wow! Thank you. I’m really glad that my channel is helping you. Keep working 💪🏽

Vor 2 years
yuva raj
yuva raj

Her smile at the end expressed pain. Well articulated. Tone maintained throughout the speech. Great.

Vor year
FumbleKin
FumbleKin

This was actually pretty accurate. Well done. I didn't get mad once at people saying that there is pay difference between men and women in the same job.

Vor Tag
Huriya Qurashi
Huriya Qurashi

I still love this speech soo much and keep listening to this , she is soo sweet and confident here I love her - not just beacuse she did Hermione beacuse of her maturness and truthness too❤❤❤

Vor 10 Monate
Rose D. Rivers
Rose D. Rivers

Feminism by definition is...and Hermione takes the stage!!!! This is the kind of speech that comes straight from the heart and the speech that sets fire to hundreds of other women waiting to take flight.

Vor year
Peter Larkins
Peter Larkins

Great speech Emma and keep fighting for equality.

Vor year
lyli 56
lyli 56

Thank you very much Emma to defend our civil rights. I'm a feminist and I'm proud. 2:49 me too and I think everybody must think that, just for eguality ⚧👧🏻👧🏾=🧑🏻🧑🏿 PS : excuse me for the errors, I'm french and my English isn't very good... 😅

Vor year
kashinath kundu
kashinath kundu

My heart is filled with respect for Emma Watson

Vor year
Some ducks
Some ducks

That’s what you call a speech from the bottom of the heart. 😀👍👍

Vor year
samruddhi sharma
samruddhi sharma

I just came here to make my British accent better but I am too engrossed in her speech that I totally forgot that I've came here to learn. ❤️

Vor year
Poudel Sandip
Poudel Sandip

it is encouraging to all . i hope you will create more videos like this . it is also optimum way to learn to speak english..

Vor 3 years
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us.”

Vor year
Sean McCarthy
Sean McCarthy

at least someone understands the "other side" of this controversy

Vor Monat
LittleMovieStarGirl10
LittleMovieStarGirl10

Wow bravo Emma!! 🤩 You’re an inspiration 💕 Love from France 🇫🇷 P.S your speech made me cry ✨

Vor year
My Name
My Name

I love her and the words she says❤️

Vor 2 years
Elonora Abdykalyk
Elonora Abdykalyk

I have been strongly impressed by her brilliant speech. Wow. Thank you very much for the video!!!

Vor year
Nicolle Fonseca
Nicolle Fonseca

Her voice is so sweet and lovely!! Amazing speech ❤️

Vor year
Rakib ansari
Rakib ansari

Her speech really made me cry 😫😥 I am really proud of you my friend EMMA .

Vor 2 years
R.P Ojha
R.P Ojha

Emma Watson has delivered her speech very seriously and shared her thoughts and feelings. She is right to say that still, there is no gender equality in the world. The fair sex is being discriminated against. This is a serious problem which concerns us all.There is no reason why such attitudes and practices should continue. Human beings, male or female, are one and the same consciousness.

Vor 2 years
Jonathan Long Tin Huen
Jonathan Long Tin Huen

I've heard that Hermione voice for too long I can never forget it. If only people could create more masterpieces like Harry Potter.

Vor 9 Monate
Teja Vignesh
Teja Vignesh

I'm really happy that Emma (Hermione) (#potterhead ) has spoken this. And there's something that I'd like to say. This system not only affects women but also affects men. Just think about it. Hopefully someday before I die, I wish I could see a world with sexual equality.

Vor 2 years
Maanya Gujral
Maanya Gujral

She is absolutely right. Love her.

Vor 10 Monate
Ryu Sensei
Ryu Sensei

I love it when she's speaking i can feel her emotions ❤

Vor 2 years
SM
SM

I believe

Vor year
Thành An
Thành An

Emma Watson's speech was very good and interesting. It helped me change my mind about women's rights. Thanks you so much

Vor 6 Monate
Ayu Ningrum
Ayu Ningrum

I see ministry of magic's speech. I really love her as Hermione and so much as herself, Emma.

Vor 2 years
SOPHY JOBIN
SOPHY JOBIN

In school we have a declamation competition and actually I just took this one and I secured the 1 st prize .actually I love the way she speaks,she expresses her views

Vor year
SOPHY JOBIN
SOPHY JOBIN

Daniel, 2 teachers were male and 2 teachers were female

Vor year
Obida Shaikh
Obida Shaikh

It directly came from your heart!! Love from india

Vor 3 years
I Y I Edit MASTER
I Y I Edit MASTER

@NjN XDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Vor year
Putri Nabila R
Putri Nabila R

@ijie chen I'm so agree with you

Vor year
ijie chen
ijie chen

surya jaguar I think India need to care about female,protect them safe

Vor 2 years
Subashini
Subashini

@ijie chen i know but i haven't seen yet

Vor 2 years
ijie chen
ijie chen

surya jaguar yes!do you know this film?

Vor 2 years
Maricon Silo
Maricon Silo

I love the way she speaked because she was too expressive,brave and justifiable person.That's why I liked her personality.😍💗

Vor year
A Muktadir
A Muktadir

Love her speech.

Vor year
u/bolehland
u/bolehland

AGREE WITH THAT,I LOVE HER POWERFUL SPEECH

Vor year
Kajal Gupta
Kajal Gupta

Such a powerful speech

Vor 3 years
Hasna Warda
Hasna Warda

So inspired !!! Lot of thanks for English Speech 💕

Vor 4 years
English Speeches
English Speeches

Thank you for watching :)

Vor 4 years
Vasco De Nogales
Vasco De Nogales

This lovely woman is so sensible, I don't know almost a thing abot feminism, but thanks to these kind of women, I encourage myself to read more and get more learnt about this subjects, because it involves us all. And the news word I've learnt while watching this were: "behalf" and "dropping out". This was an amazing video. I can't feel disapointed about Emma cause she's been always celver though.

Vor 3 years
Aradhya pal
Aradhya pal

Soo effective and lovely speech... 😍

Vor year
ᄒᄋ
ᄒᄋ

i love her speech so much!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Vor 3 years
neyraaa
neyraaa

Oh lord, what a wonderful speech !!!!!!

Vor 11 Monate
Ta Thi Thu Hoai H4057
Ta Thi Thu Hoai H4057

I just want to watch this video to study English but every time I watch this video, I all nearly cry. Feminism happened to me a long time ago even when I was little, even when I don't know the word "Feminism". English seems to be so wonderful that thanks to it, I can reach other people's opinions, feelings and then think back to myself. Emma Watson is very confident to speak out her feelings in front of many people. As she said: "No country in the world can yet say that they have achieved gender quality", maybe her work, her inspiration can not change the world, but I hope that in some time, she can change the world in someone's eyes, of course that's including me. Thanks for everything!

Vor 3 Monate
Luca Skyline
Luca Skyline

it's incredible how she's able to transmit her feelings...Even more incredible, how everything has been ruined by the audio quality....

Vor year
Md Nasirunnisa
Md Nasirunnisa

Really inspiring speech

Vor 2 years
Tetsurō Kuroo
Tetsurō Kuroo

Woman, you are beautiful, you are strong, and you are powerful. You are right in every single way. We love you!!❤️

Vor 7 Monate
CA Humour Life
CA Humour Life

thanks , I will be so glad if you will continue to make more videos like this with fine subtitles . ☺

Vor 2 years
Mussah Karsum Jalaide
Mussah Karsum Jalaide

Hermione Granger of my childhood 😍😍🤗

Vor 2 years
Harsimar Singh
Harsimar Singh

True

Vor 11 Monate
Queen of shadow
Queen of shadow

I was appointed six months ago and the more I have spoken about feminism the more I have realized that fighting for women’s rights has too often become synonymous with man-hating. If there is one thing I know for certain, it is that this has to stop. For the record, feminism by definition is: “The belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities. It is the theory of the political, economic and social equality of the sexes.” I started questioning gender-based assumptions a long time ago when I was eight, I was confused at being called “bossy,” because I wanted to direct the plays we would put on for our parents—but the boys were not. When at 14, I started being sexualized by certain elements of the media. When at 15, my girlfriends started dropping out of their sports teams because they didn’t want to appear “muscly.” When at 18, my male friends were unable to express their feelings. I decided that I was a feminist and this seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminist. Apparently I am among the ranks of women whose expressions are seen as too strong, too aggressive, isolating, an anti-men, and unattractive. Why has the word become such an uncomfortable one? I am from Britain and think it is right that I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decisions that will affect my life. I think it is right that socially I am afforded the same respect as men. But sadly, I can say that there is no one country in the world where all women can expect to receive these rights. No country in the world can yet say that they have achieved the gender equality. Thank you very very much.

Vor year
Shriti sharma
Shriti sharma

Pls update more British accent speeches.. I highly respect ur work.. Thanks for providing us such a platform to enhance ourselves.. Thanks again

Vor 3 years
nithin
nithin

She is the true definition of feminism 🔥

Vor 11 Monate
Madhu Wijenayaka
Madhu Wijenayaka

These every words are coming from her heart ❤

Vor 2 years
Ram Mohan Reddi
Ram Mohan Reddi

She Was Amazing 😍, Men And women have the same equal to rights to live in the world 🌎

Vor 2 Monate
Enost Enost
Enost Enost

This speech can help me to learn english. Thank you so much.

Vor year
Neuriceia Maria Miranda
Neuriceia Maria Miranda

Great speech, thank you for sharing your point of view with us.

Vor Monat
Zulfuqar Yusifli
Zulfuqar Yusifli

GREAT SPEECH !!!

Vor year
l.pelin alparslan
l.pelin alparslan

i love her! She is such a incredable and self-trusted person.

Vor 11 Monate
DpK
DpK

Love this❤️

Vor year
Anthony P
Anthony P

I just found your channel. This is amazing. You are great. Keep it up.

Vor 3 years
Ali Ebrahimi
Ali Ebrahimi

thanks a lots Emma watson! for shearing your nice speech. in here I can learn a lot of things. first: I can improve my language English especially my pronunciations. second: I learned we should respect women and I find many thing among your speech.

Vor 2 years
Shawn Taran. R. R
Shawn Taran. R. R

True, I looked up the meaning of feminism after hearing this. I feel so ashamed now. Way to go Emma!

Vor year
Watch me
Watch me

She is more then just a inspiration I am 11 even these words are meant for big people I still find her very lovely, amazing and talented

Vor 10 Monate
Hermione Granger
Hermione Granger

Is there anyone in this world who fits Hermione's character as much as Emma? All the characteristics of Hermione are present in Emma💙 .. Not only Emma's beauty but also her heart is beautiful💞..... ("IF NOT ME, WHO? IF NOT NOW, WHEN?" ~my queen Em)

Vor 3 Monate
Alieffia Faricha
Alieffia Faricha

inspiring speech thank Emma :)

Vor 3 years
Tuệ Hân Mai
Tuệ Hân Mai

Emma Waston you such amazing women, and the English speech that you talk was so wonderful. Thank you

Vor 11 Monate
Alaia Svaiser
Alaia Svaiser

Está muy bien la idea, sin embargo hubo algunas veces en las que no pusiste una contracción, omitiste una palabra o incluso agregaste. Por lo demás me pareció un muy buen vídeo :)

Vor 3 years
Sayeda Nasiba
Sayeda Nasiba

Emma Watson is a inspiration to many girls (including me) iam proud of her ❤

Vor 10 Monate
Mursheda Mily
Mursheda Mily

I Loved the way how Emma explain feminism.

Vor 2 years
Hien Dong
Hien Dong

This what a inspirational speech!

Vor 8 Monate
TAYLORxxx SWIFT
TAYLORxxx SWIFT

I LOVE HER PERSONALITY,HER ACCENT.SHE IS SOO STRONG WOMAN.WE ARE PROUD OF YOU EMMA😗😍🤗💖💝❤

Vor 2 years
I Y I Edit MASTER
I Y I Edit MASTER

@Online Doctor Seuss OH SNAP, brugh BRUGHHHHHHHHHHHHH did u copy this or what?!!?!?, If not , How much time do u have to right that0_0 I am only here for a school project but like= 0_0 good work?

Vor year
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us."

Vor year
OSAGIE E. Guobadia - Second YT Channel
OSAGIE E. Guobadia - Second YT Channel

The best English speech, Miss Watson ever spoken. 👍🏿😀

Vor year
CAN I GET 200 SUBS BEFORE I DIE FROM COVID
CAN I GET 200 SUBS BEFORE I DIE FROM COVID

I love listen speeches from her and other people they inspire me so much to keep going and enjoy like.

Vor year
Mohammad Chami
Mohammad Chami

I Used to love her as an Actress and now i love her for fighting for Women Rights 👍🏻💪🏼

Vor 2 years
Online Doctor Seuss
Online Doctor Seuss

“Gender equality is your issue too.” That was the message to men from Emma Watson, Harry Potter star and now United Nations Women Goodwill Ambassador, in her widely hailed U.N. speech earlier this week announcing a new feminist campaign with a “formal invitation” to male allies to join. Noting that men suffer from sexism in their own ways, Watson asked, “How can we affect change in the world when only half of it is invited or feel welcome to participate in the conversation?” Truer words were never spoken. Too bad they are belied by the campaign itself, which is called “HeForShe” and asks men to pledge to “take action against all forms of violence and discrimination faced by women and girls” but says nothing about problems affecting men and boys. Watson clearly believes that feminism — which, she stressed, is about equality and not bashing men — will also solve men’s problems. But, unfortunately, feminism in its present form has too often ignored sexist biases against males, and sometimes has actively contributed to them. Until that changes, the movement for gender equality will be incomplete. Take one of the men’s issues Watson mentioned in her speech: seeing her divorced father’s role as a parent “valued less by society” than her mother’s. It is true that in the 1970s and 1980s, feminist challenges to discriminatory, sex-specific laws helped end formal preferences for mothers in child custody matters. But as fathers began to fight against more covert anti-male biases in the court system, most feminists sided with mothers. There are plenty of other examples. The women’s movement has fought, rightly, for more societal attention to domestic abuse and sexual violence. But male victims of these crimes still tend to get short shrift, from the media and activists alike. Despite several recent high-profile recent sexual assault cases in which the victims were teenage girls, disturbing cases in which boys were victimized — by other boys or by girls — have received far less publicity and sparked little outrage. Experiments have shown that while people are quick to intervene when a man in a staged public quarrel becomes physically abusive to his girlfriend, reactions to a similar situation with the genders reversed mostly range from indifference to amusement or even sympathy for the woman. To a large extent, as feminists sometimes point out, these attitudes stem from traditional gender norms which treat victimhood, especially at a woman’s hands, as unmanly. But today’s mainstream feminism, which regards sexual assault and domestic violence as byproducts of male power over women, tends to reinforce rather than challenge such double standards. Just in the past few days, many feminist commentators have taken great umbrage at suggestions that soccer star Hope Solo, currently facing charges for assaulting her sister and teenage nephew, deserves similar censure to football player Ray Rice, who was caught on video striking his fiancée. Their argument boils down to the assertion that violence by men toward their female partners should be singled out because it’s a bigger problem than female violence toward family members. Meanwhile, in Watson’s native England, activists from women’s organizations recently blamed the shortage of services for abused women on efforts to accommodate abused men (despite the fact that, as Guardian columnist and blogger Ally Fogg demonstrated, even the lowest estimates of the prevalence of domestic violence against men suggest that male victims are far less likely than women to get help). Watson deserves credit for wanting to end the idea that “fighting for women’s rights [is] synonymous with man-hating.” But she cannot do that if she treats such notions only as unfair stereotypes. How about addressing this message to feminists who complain about being “asked to modify our language so we don’t hurt men’s feelings” when talking about misogyny — for instance, not to generalize about all men as oppressors? Or to those who argue that “Kill all men” mugs and “I bathe in male tears” T-shirts are a great way to celebrate women’s empowerment and separate the “cool dudes” who get the joke from the “dumb bros”? Or to those who accuse a feminist woman of “victim-blaming” for defending her son against a sexual assault accusation — even one of which he is eventually cleared? Men must, indeed, “feel welcome to participate in the conversation” about gender issues. But very few will do so if that “conversation” amounts to being told to “shut up and listen” while women talk about the horrible things men do to women, and being labeled a misogynist for daring to point out that bad things happen to men too and that women are not always innocent victims in gender conflicts. A real conversation must let men talk not only about feminist-approved topics such as gender stereotypes that keep them from expressing their feelings, but about more controversial concerns: wrongful accusations of rape; sexual harassment policies that selectively penalize men for innocuous banter; lack of options to avoid unwanted parenthood once conception has occurred. Such a conversation would also acknowledge that pressures on men to be successful come not only from “the patriarchy” but, often, from women as well. And it would include an honest discussion of parenthood, including many women’s reluctance to give up or share the primary caregiver role. It goes without saying that these are “First World problems.” In far too many countries around the world, women still lack basic rights and patriarchy remains very real (though it is worth noting that even in those places, men and boys often have to deal with gender-specific hardships, from forced recruitment into war to mass violence that singles out males). But in the industrial democracies of North America and Europe, the revolution in women’s rights over the past century has been a stunning success — and, while there is still work to be done, it must include the other side of that revolution. Not “he for she,” but “She and he for us."

Vor year
Huyền Anh Nguyễn
Huyền Anh Nguyễn

I love her accent, every word she said really make me inpsrised

Vor year
Waly Box
Waly Box

To inspire you to be strong woman nice

Vor year
Basic Education
Basic Education

Excellent Expression to deliver her speech

Vor 2 years
Peeter England
Peeter England

She speaks very well about her life as well as feminist

Vor 2 years
Preet Kaur
Preet Kaur

Love Emma she is an inspiration

Vor year
TALENT HUB
TALENT HUB

This has my heart ❤️

Vor 7 Monate

Nächster

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