Dark Matter's Not Enough - with Andrew Pontzen

  • Am Vor 8 years

    The Royal InstitutionThe Royal Institution

    Andrew Pontzen on why the Universe should be weirder.
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    The Universe seems to be governed by rules that we can, with some effort, understand. Andrew Pontzen introduces the stranger side of the cosmos - dark matter and dark energy - but then argues that these things are not so weird or unexpected after all. The strangest thing is that our rule-laden cosmos should be so predictable.

    Andrew Pontzen is a lecturer and Royal Society University Research Fellow at University College London, as well as a musician and science communicator. His work focuses on galaxy formation and computational cosmology, as well as some early-Universe physics. Previously, he has held fellowships at Oxford Astrophysics and at the Kavli Institute for Cosmology in Cambridge. And now, he finds the time to go around the country presenting shows at science festivals.

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Mike
Mike

He may not be a good comedian but he's a damn good teacher and knows exactly what he is doing. There was no point in time where I felt like the topic was boring or thought of something else and didn't listen. This is an amazing talk! Well done!

Vor 7 years
Phil Lynott
Phil Lynott

Nah, he is a good comedian

Vor year
Patrick TAYLOR
Patrick TAYLOR

He's a great comedian.

Vor 2 years
NLB90805
NLB90805

He certainly has a knack for drawing in those people who have a deep knowledge of physical science. And those people who never stop learning. I really enjoyed this Lecture. I wish I had more Teacher's like him going through all the different years of schooling. Those who can make any subject fun and keep one 'Tuned' in is an absolute Gem of a purveyor of knowledge.

Vor 3 years
Jamie Waymire
Jamie Waymire

What a dynamic and fun speaker! Held my attention the entire time and that is hard to do! I enjoyed this immensely!

Vor 3 years
Cas the Triangle
Cas the Triangle

It was impossible to me to be distracted from this lecture. Andrew Pontzen is awesome at science communicating, information and humour were mixed in right proportions. Also, I didn't know there was chaos theory holding some place in dark matter problem, it really motivates to learn it more. And that long-exposure shot of the pendulum looked a lot like attractors in fractal graphic redactors. English isn't my first language so it's far from ideal but I'm trying to improve it.

Vor 7 years
Adithya Parupudi
Adithya Parupudi

I thoroughly enjoyed every minute of explanation. It was made very simple to understand. That means he really knows his stuff. Very very interesting

Vor 3 years
KotSR
KotSR

This is so cool, he must be an amazing teacher.

Vor 6 years
Sean Joseph
Sean Joseph

A Great lecture on what we really don't know, I enjoyed it immensely and the lecturer is endearingly awkward and makes his points as clearly as is possible with such a "mysterious" subject.

Vor 6 years
Günter Strubinsky
Günter Strubinsky

I love it and so did the kids. You would never get them there, even less to listen to as complex matter as Mr. Pontzen talked about. Absolutely hilarious! Not to mention very brave of him to step out of science's comfort zone! (Ooops, I mentioned it)

Vor 5 years
Julian Bass-Krueger
Julian Bass-Krueger

Great lecture. Sometimes with the kid-geared RI lectures, it doesnt hold my interest. But this weaved together dark matter, chaos theory, and even economics in ways i never expected. Kudos! Also i thought it was pretty hilarious

Vor 2 Monate
Sophie Dockx
Sophie Dockx

“You can see why this is my favourite experiment: it’s pretty exciting.” What a teacher!

Vor year
Naz Osman
Naz Osman

to all of you complaining about his humour, there are kids in the audience and they were engaged the whole time. Difficult to get kids attention these days. Brilliantly done.

Vor 3 years
Phil Lynott
Phil Lynott

"it's difficult to get kids attention these days"? What is your basis for this comment

Vor year
Terry Fulds Gaming
Terry Fulds Gaming

@WmTyndale are you deaf? There's clearly children in the audience... you can hear them constantly...

Vor 3 years
WmTyndale
WmTyndale

Those are OXbridge Students not the kind that are amused easily by cartoons, sports and hollywood porno!

Vor 3 years
Trucmuche
Trucmuche

I posted a comment about his humour, then read your comment and decided to delete mine.

Vor 3 years
susan hawkins
susan hawkins

🙏🙏👍 thanks for making a vague, mystifying subject (to me) just that little bit clearer. Terrific delivery - I was totally engaged throughout. And yes, the English accent and well versed, animated delivery made it all the more enjoyable. Back in my day during school physics lessons half of this subject matter wasn’t even a consideration!

Vor year
Fight For Your Freedom
Fight For Your Freedom

Brilliant and entertaining too! Learned a few new things about dark matter that nothing that I had come across before had explained.

Vor 4 years
Donald Hawkins
Donald Hawkins

have watched hundreads of lectures on physics, cosmolgy, found this to be one of the more intresting and understandble

Vor 6 years
msGvious
msGvious

I wish I'd had a lecturer like Andrew Pontzen when I was at school :)

Vor 6 years
Tony Wells
Tony Wells

@Lesseirg Papers Way derp.

Vor 10 Monate
Kristof Burek
Kristof Burek

Like physics, my school teacher was quite serious. But he also knew when to use humour and his eccentricity to entertain his class and bring clarity to a principle. Thanks! Mr Stevenson! you raised a lifelong student of physics! And also thanks! to Andrew Pontzen! Mush enjoyed!

Vor 3 years
Lesseirg Papers
Lesseirg Papers

@Ralph Clark Then show me respect. I know more than Suesskind. I would not blabber such nonsense. In Physic "to some extent it works" lacks any rigor of thinking. It is the words of a scam artist a snake oil drifter. Wake up man. America is not about being "tongue tied by authority" as per Shakespeare. In the last 70 years these clowns have been leading you in a Alicen wonderland using ridiculous terms with no meaning that results in absurd unverifiable predictions. Just a ;lone the recent pictures of the Black Holes was deeply dishonest.

Vor 3 years
Lesseirg Papers
Lesseirg Papers

@Ralph Clark The last 60 years they have been promising break throughs. Every time I look into these theories they fall apart under critical scrutiny. And they all tend to violate the principle that something and nothing cannot exist in the same time. If you look at it they are now consorting to fraud like the recent black hole pictures. These are not even close to the reality. The universe expanding at several times the speed of light? They are moving farther from physic and creating SciFI. These clowns are so warped in their head that the misinterpret every simple experiment. Take Prof Nimtz for example.

Vor 3 years
Matt Shaw Loves Black Girls
Matt Shaw Loves Black Girls

What a fabulous lecturer! Really good.

Vor 2 years
skodbolle
skodbolle

Great lecture, and humor helps you learn so much more :)

Vor 3 years
Lajos Baranyi
Lajos Baranyi

So well done! Amazing!

Vor 3 years
Nigel Oulton
Nigel Oulton

Well one thing is certain and it is that Andrew Pontzen's got to be one of the best science communicators I have ever had the pleasure to watch - well done Andrew - and if you watch this then also take a little more time to watch the question and answer session - I haven't seen so many young people so enthused about science before - awesome.

Vor 7 years
Andrew Pontzen
Andrew Pontzen

@Quintinohthree @Nigel Oulton thank you both, such nice comments as this make the effort worthwhile!

Vor 7 years
Quintinohthree
Quintinohthree

He is a great entertainer as well. The humour he uses in this hourlong lecture is such that I'd gladly go to the RI over a nearby theater where for the same hour another man tries to entertain people with comedy alone. We definitely need more lectures like these.

Vor 7 years
Melvin Shelton
Melvin Shelton

Your YouTube blurb is spot-on in listing "science communicator" as one of your roles. You are definitely a star. In the sciences, it seems that you know something about a subject when you can simplify it without distortion, clearly enough that non-scientists can understand it, and remember it. You, like Sagan and Feynmann, have that gift. If I had had you, at some time, as my teacher in physics, I would have been seduced into studying cosmololgy. (At least, until my math gave out...) Thanks. I would like to see one of your professional presentations, but London is a long way from Seattle; I hope you have a lot of stuff on YT! M.D. Shelton, M.D., Ph.D. (Biophysical Sciences)

Vor 3 years
01987 N?a
01987 N?a

This guys an amazing presenter!

Vor 2 years
Hamza Riazuddin
Hamza Riazuddin

briliant presentation...I was looking for something more technical but ended up watching the whole thing because of his style....clearly not just for kids but brilliant to see science taught in such a way...

Vor 3 years
Larry Lentini
Larry Lentini

If I calculated more gravity than I was expecting in a galaxy my first thought would be the black hole at the center, and if it was around the galaxy I would imagine regular gases at play not a new type of matter. Why do physicists always assume the most complicated answer to a question?

Vor 2 years
Robert Howes
Robert Howes

It could also be very simple. If dark energy is the force that is accelerating the furthest galaxies, it could simply be the gravity from universes beyond ours pulling our galaxies and our galaxies pulling theirs. All falling down, except down is the space between the universes.

Vor 3 years
Mark Wadsworth
Mark Wadsworth

Andrew, you know more about economics than most economists 😀

Vor 3 years
dementus420
dementus420

This channel rules. I just can't help but have this nagging thought and feeling that there has to be a grand, completely sensible solution in the form of the elusive unifying theory of everything that will make all this bloody insanity make absolute perfect sense even to a layperson and all these maddeningly strange concepts in our super weird universe will no longer confound us all to no end and will line up quite nicely into the ultimate 'ah ha!' moment people like you and me would wallow and revel in until we are adequately satisfied like proverbial pigs in shyte. All this ....stuff, for lack of a better word, just cannot be so at odds with our everyday reality. There just must be some logical explanation.

Vor 3 years
Sam O Neill
Sam O Neill

I'm a 50 year old kid and that was brilliant. Thank you so much

Vor 2 years
maxpandey
maxpandey

An amazing topic brilliantly matched with the sparkling analysis of the mysterious universe ..

Vor 2 years
eddy r
eddy r

A thousand times more informative than any of the BBC Horizon episodes of the last decade.

Vor 3 years
Keith Mc
Keith Mc

"I love the fact that the world's most advanced economy can basically be modeled by three year olds playing monopoly." Best joke by Andrew Pontzen. At 54:04 mark.

Vor 3 years
Henry Johnson
Henry Johnson

I quite enjoyed the lecture, but I have one question. You talked about how dark matter has its own and is affected by gravity but not other forces. With the idea that it will pass through “normal” matter, is it not possible that at least some would be captured and held in the center of planets thus increasing the strength of a planet’s gravity? On that note as well, would we not be able to potentially detect or see the effects of dark matter’s gravity as it passes through our “normal” matter?

Vor 2 years
chaptiss1
chaptiss1

I love this guy, I'm so glad I stumbled upon this video.

Vor 4 years
Federico Abascal
Federico Abascal

Thanks so much for this lecture and the great Q&As

Vor 3 years
Ronald de Rooij
Ronald de Rooij

Andrew Pontzen is in fact a great science communicator.

Vor 7 years
Danie van der Westhuizen
Danie van der Westhuizen

Very interesting talk, and well presented.

Vor 5 years
Bill Smith
Bill Smith

he has a very good delivery. I enjoyed listening and learning.

Vor 3 years
Doriphor
Doriphor

So here's a thought I just had. How does the universe resolve interactions in situations where irrational numbers are involved?

Vor year
Jorge Constâncio
Jorge Constâncio

i just love to know about how humanity stands in matters of science right now, thank you all by this :)

Vor 4 years
Youtube Music
Youtube Music

he is a veryy talented speaker and he really can get the attention of the young people in his audience with ecellent ideas and in the end he showed an absolutely brilliant computer simulation how galaxies in the early universe merge and how they are pulled together by their dark matter. All these facts were presented with a profound knowledge of didactics and great and fantastic sense of humour that caught the young people by their heart. This wa s one of the best and smartest talks that i ever heard on dark matter Joerg J.

Vor 3 years
CSEGAR
CSEGAR

I Loved this lecture.

Vor 4 years
Ee Jay
Ee Jay

When humor is deserted by science, and science deserted by humor, then science has become as extreme as fundamental theology, religion, and that's where both shadows meet at both ends, when we realize both were never afar from each other. I'm glad he mixed humor and science, cause I feel extreme rationalism is what is killing the true sciences that man does Not Yet understand. Thank you sir.

Vor 6 years
chestypants78
chestypants78

The part around 45:00 re: economics 'dragulescu and yakovenko 2001' was fascinating. Great lecture.

Vor 2 years
Daniel Hughes
Daniel Hughes

So if you smash particles together in a particle accelerator then we would expect 75% of the stuff created to be dark matter and we wouldn't be able to detect it, so doesn't that mean all we need to do is add up all the stuff (energy + matter) after the collision and it should add up to only 25% of what we put in. Are our detectors good enough to do this, and if so have we done it?

Vor 4 years
Robert Habbersett
Robert Habbersett

As someone else indicated (below in my internet dialog) I, too, wish I had a lecturer as interesting, animated and dynamic as Andrew during my education. What a treat that would have been! However, although I agree with some things he said, there are so many unstated assumptions in the current mindset of physicists and cosmologists - as expressed so eloquently by Andrew. For instance, the ASSUMPTION is made that the observed redshift (initially discovered by Edwin Hubble) of distant galaxies is attributed to a Doppler shift caused solely by recessional velocity. Hubble did not accept this interpretation (which was espoused by Georges LeMatre for dubious reasons) throughout his lifetime. His original data did not show a clear trend, infact. This attribution is based on an untestable assumption, since we humans - in our infinite wisdom - can't think of any other possibility (and we can't travel out into intergalactic space with a radar gun). The level of hubris here is simply astonishing! We do the same thing in thinking, because we can do a few calculations (mathematical hallucinations), that we can uncover the origins of the universe!! Really??? The postulation of the existence of dark matter also reveals "our" arrogance. The assumption made here is that we know all there is to know about gravity - which I don't think we do - and that gravity is the only operational force out in the cosmos, despite the fact that electromagnetic forces are 40 orders of magnitude stronger; yet there is no role for it (EM), according to those physicists and cosmologists. We think we understand everything there is to know about gravity and therefore there MUST be more mass to account for the (otherwise) anomalous velocity curves that we think we can measure unambiguously in distant galaxies. Hence, now there is DARK MATTER. And even worse, now there IS dark energy!

Vor 3 years
sanjuansteve
sanjuansteve

Is it possible that a photon is a particle that acts like a wave because it has a dark matter particle orbiting it, pulling it into an axial wave motion as it travels? And that perhaps the only reason for photons' max speed limit is the dark matter they're paired with?

Vor 5 years
Big Country
Big Country

it would be difficult to say whether we can feel dark matter, or not, because we've always been subjected to it, so the true experiment would be to figure out how to block dark matter, and then ask that question.

Vor 6 Monate
Paul G
Paul G

He is solid gold !!

Vor 3 years
Debasish Ray Chawdhuri
Debasish Ray Chawdhuri

I think what the last graph really tells us is that the physicists can be really really wrong about the dark matter thing and can still make a prediction of the formation of the galaxy that looks correct.

Vor year
Gene Bradley
Gene Bradley

Believe it or not, I actually tried to become an Astrophysicist. I simply did not have the math skills for post graduate studies. I went into the aerospace industry which I believe is more lucrative. That being said, I have always thought that, maybe, dark matter could be primordal black holes formed as the univerce began or when it began to cool. Not large enough to bend light but have enough mass to explain other phenomena, gravity. I'd like to know if anyone has crunched the numbers.

Vor 3 years
Oicub
Oicub

If Dark Matter feels gravity but doesn't feel the electromagnetic force then it should be abundant in the centre of stars as it would pass through them with ease and be drawn in by gravitational force

Vor 3 years
David Spector
David Spector

Patterns are indeed important, but the specifics are even more important. That is why 100 years from now physics and daily life will be different due to genuine breakthroughs in understanding. And that final question, whose answer was omitted, is very interesting indeed, since neutrinos are passing through the Earth and us right now in great quantities, and they do act like dark matter.

Vor 3 years
ellaa m
ellaa m

great lecture, thanks

Vor 5 years
Karla May
Karla May

I enjoyed it so much that I didn't realize he spoke for 54 minutes. He delivers well and his jokes amazing! I feel like I understand but know nothing at all! I could listen to him all day and still not get bored. Most teachers should be like him, I mean, there are still wonderful teachers but most of them don't know how to teach and are only there for your grades. Lessons should be fun and interesting just like this, not boring reiteration of the books. Wish I could see him lecture in person. More power to you Professor!

Vor year
wailinburnin
wailinburnin

Comments on the presentation - seemed silly to some - but his delivery was totally chaotic, it was brilliant to his point. Bravo. Even ended with a jab at injustice with the economy bit (like a super clever anarchist, right there on Faraday’s desk!) subtlety indoctrinating your kids. Brilliant performance, guy’s a total genius!

Vor 10 Monate
John McClain
John McClain

A couple things, regarding the pendulum, first off, an "led" is a coherent light source, meaning you lose substantial light when it's even slightly off axis with the camera, leading to the "dead zone" on the right. The second thing is the fact we are dealing with a "pendulum situation" as "control" so we must see back and forth movement based on the length and mass ratio, controlling the harmonic frequency, meaning every movement must move through the middle, to get to the other side, so right from the start, it's in the middle twice as much as either side, but in fact, equal time, on average, to both sides added up, that would be the equivalent means of looking for common patterns, in the sides, basically, folding down the middle, vertically. I suspect there would be a similar pattern density in the two sides, put together, to that in the center. I'm not sure, but trying to consider the issues mechanical in its movements.

Vor year
Falk Flak
Falk Flak

the example of modeling economics was an eye opener. You can have a solution/approximation without knowing whats actually going on. That was very humble. In contrast, when listening to other science presenters talking about dark matter and "stuff" you sometimes get the impression they want you to think they figured it all out.

Vor year
PongoXBongo
PongoXBongo

What if we take yet another thing that we're familiar with: E=mc^2? Could dark energy be converted dark matter? Not "out of nowhere", but out of familiar processes.

Vor 5 years
Leya Wonder
Leya Wonder

I found his jokes quite funny actually, am I alone here

Vor 5 years
Hillcry
Hillcry

I hate to be that guy, add my 2 cents among already many over the last 3 years but I think it is important to note the quality difference between current released lectures and these past lectures. This individual is great there is no denying that, and I am not targeting him. He has far superior knowledge to me and will most likely triple the information I will learn in my own lifetime. He is trying his very hardest in this lecture and doing a great job but is being held back by this awful production. It is as simple as the mic being to close to his face with the gain too high, something that can and should be briefly tested before the lecture or any production begins. I've been annoyed by previous lectures production or even how the presenter, presents his/her piece and have been able to sit through it, but this production *breath* *smack* is very *breath* I don't know *breath* *breath, smack* inaudible. Couldn't get past 10 minutes. Hoping to reinforce the importance of mic checking and again the later lectures are much better, I just hope for the sake of not only the audience but the presenter him/herself that this doesn't happen again.

Vor 4 years
Bijan Ajamlou
Bijan Ajamlou

Great presentation!

Vor 4 years
Kevin Byrne
Kevin Byrne

Dark matter reminds me of the 19th century "aether", which was the medium through which light propagated. It was postulated to be very hard but so diffuse that planets and stars could pass through it without resistance.

Vor 3 years
Leon Britton
Leon Britton

To point out, chaos is a question of systematic understanding, he pointed out that it is difficult to be precise about the start conditions of any given system. His point was more despite this lack of available initial field conditions that we can infer that dark matter field and dark energy fields both exist.

Vor 2 years
Kathy Young
Kathy Young

Humor is a wonderful teaching tool! Sorry some commenters prefer dry boring lectures. Most people appreciate humor.

Vor 3 years
theblindsniper1
theblindsniper1

So could particles of matter, energy, dark matter, and dark energy be made of the same stuff?

Vor 7 years
Eric Hopper
Eric Hopper

There are, in fact, a very small number of galaxies that are very low in dark matter. So, not every single galaxy has dark matter, just the vast majority of them.

Vor 4 years
Reigh
Reigh

I noticed a pretty big pattern in the pendulum right away based on beginning time end time and energy and resistance that follows pretty clear rules of emergence theory. In the beginning the pendulum given more energy to fight resistance like life being a form of chaos that fights against the rules of resistance and entropy at the beginning of the experiment The New birth of life has energy and that gives it more freedom to be chaotic similar to the forming of our solar system but as things meet resistance of each other over time they develop a clear pattern defined by the rules of the universe as a whole that I see in all things as the emergence pattern life follows to continue functioning before a more complete entropy in a neutral universe of energy seeing heat or cold death. The biggest problem with the pendulum model is that you are letting the energy escape into a much more intertwined interactive physics model that is everything but the pendulum surrounding the pendulum and only looking at the very basic hard rules of the circles that the pendulum is capable of occupying and it then lacks the dynamics of the air and the layers touching the air have in them.

Vor 4 years
DavidFMayerPhD
DavidFMayerPhD

Either: "Dark Matter" exists in abundance, Or: Gravity at interstellar distances does NOT behave the way we think that it does. Perhaps, at interstellar distances, gravity is 6 times as strong as we believe it to be?

Vor 2 years
Mike mike
Mike mike

Dark matter don't exist, we just don't fully understand gravity yet Yet scientists is so bold to say it exist Waste millions of dollars for detection but zero progress

Vor year
BrainPain
BrainPain

David, some physicists are working on modified gravity theories. If your implying we don't seem to be taking it serious enough......I agree. On the particle physics side of dark matter we have eliminated much of the possibilities and supersymmetry looks grim based on latest cern runs. I think we learned from the discoveries of QM that we can't rely on our intuition outside the realm of historical human experience. I hope to live to see the answer and possibly contribute to it's resolve.

Vor 2 years
Chilledfish
Chilledfish

It's not like the thought hasn't occurred to astrophysicists. Dark matter isn't something set in stone. If you work out a better model, you are more than welcome to submit your work to a reputable journal.

Vor 2 years
woah far out
woah far out

Or we misunderstand inertia

Vor 2 years
closeup055
closeup055

But a brilliant lecture I must say

Vor 3 years
Terry Mcnee
Terry Mcnee

A man who is such a good teacher for children is a brilliant teacher for us adults too Thanks

Vor year
Frank Mc
Frank Mc

Interesting lecture .. just wondering if anyone has thought about the possibility that expansion of the Universe is increasing because there might be other Universes all around ours that are attracting the outer galaxies

Vor 3 years
David Ogawa
David Ogawa

There should be galaxies all the way out to the known _Microwave Background Radiation_ source, and beyond. However we cannot see them because the light is highly red shifted, very dim, or hasn't arrived yet. There should be a horizon beyond the MBR where spacetime is retreating faster than light.

Vor 3 years
Don't Get Mad Get Wise
Don't Get Mad Get Wise

you need to think this through. apply this same thinking to a single galaxy and what happens? how about a cluster of galaxies?

Vor 3 years
Necrikus
Necrikus

Amazing that they could get the Doctor to give a talk.

Vor 6 years
Allen Munich
Allen Munich

Yup got the dr who music going in my head his whole lecture

Vor 2 years
philstuf
philstuf

THANK YOU. I am so glad I was not the only one that got that vibe....

Vor 3 years
Sonpahien
Sonpahien

Doctor Who?

Vor 3 years
Joatmon
Joatmon

At the end I expected him to step into the cabinet and it disappear with a ziiit,, zuut, ziit, zuut....

Vor 3 years
Kieran Ryan
Kieran Ryan

Necrikus that would be a pan-dimensional experience.. getting Mr Tennant to give the talk ‚in character‘ decorated with bbc radiophonic workshop surround sound 🕰🧐

Vor 3 years
Mark Wheeler
Mark Wheeler

What if dark matter decayed over time. Could that explain the source of dark energy?

Vor 3 years
Greg MELLOTT
Greg MELLOTT

From what I understand the "dark matter" seems to locate around "notable matter" in the galaxies being looked at for the mass distribution. If there was stuff before this creation came into this space (or was created by relativistic interaction between what we might call two black holes that caused it to be initialized) then there may be a way for more mass to be created and yet not relating well to the other part that we are able to note better. So while each part is (creating) a universe in the same space; when looking from the other's perspective, one source's energy in it is much lower state much sooner so it more readily becomes black holes. As for dark energy, the same thing that helps let energy propagate as fast as possible may be the prehistoric gravity of multiverse systems. Thus the force being captured by the (near) relativistic speeding moving object is significantly greater in the direction it is propagating than the direction it moving away from.

Vor 3 years
Gy Se
Gy Se

lecture starts at 18:20

Vor 4 years
GLASS CLASS APPLE
GLASS CLASS APPLE

The sun spins. This tells me that the sun is most likely spinning around a greater galactic force. Dark matter is the basic elemental composition throughout the universe in which regulates the standard passage of time.

Vor 6 years
G. Deoudis
G. Deoudis

"You must have chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star." — Friedrich Nietzsche

Vor 3 years
SuperSlik50
SuperSlik50

My calculations have determined that adding orange and butterscotch matter into the equation would account for the missing matter . However, unlike baryonic flavors, they only interact with photons reflected from discotheque mirror balls

Vor year
Echad
Echad

if only I had a teacher like him in school...

Vor 7 years
octart
octart

one question to the measurement of the galaxy spin/mass and dark energy necessity: how do we know it's not the massive black holes (which emit light they consume but not equivalent to their mass, right?) are the reason for the discrepancy?

Vor 3 years
miglator1
miglator1

I dont understand how there can be so many people complaining about the jokes. I know most of you are physicists and are serious people and don't have any sense of humor but come on, this lecture was for kids and even if it was for adults what is the problem of making some jokes to make the lecture more dynamical. I am also a physicist and I definitely prefer that kind of lectures were the lecturer interacts with the audience rather than those boring ones were there is a person pretending to show the world that he is awsome and knows a lot of things without even minding if they are actually understanding what he is saying

Vor 4 years
Kris
Kris

The problem isn't that he's making jokes. The problem is that they aren't funny.

Vor 2 years
uz1l0v3r
uz1l0v3r

@NelC Except when they're posted on Youtube.

Vor 2 years
Terry Fulds Gaming
Terry Fulds Gaming

@KipIngram nope, you are just dead and joyless inside... anybody who whines about jokes, is not a person worth knowing... exactly the opposite. You are an anchor around the necks of everyone you come into contact with. Your negativity is poison.

Vor 3 years
KipIngram
KipIngram

Fortunately there is fast forward.

Vor 3 years
KipIngram
KipIngram

The jokes are a distraction - it seemed like every time I started to actually get *interested*, suddenly he popped a joke. Just totally deviated the flow from what the video is SUPPOSED to be about. It's not that any one of the jokes are *bad*, per se - there are just too many of them and they're intrusive.

Vor 3 years
Emma Goldman’s Ghost
Emma Goldman’s Ghost

Dark matter is about as unobservable as neutrinos used to be. Neutrinos were also suggested to explain a discrepancy between theory and experiment. Does the discrepancy in feeling arise simply because dark matter is "more important" in the universe? Not to mention that dark matter explains a large number of disparate phenomena.

Vor 2 years
Masterblou
Masterblou

I think the problem is that they're not taking into account the mass of black holes. They're deducing the mass of galaxies based on the speed at which they spin, and based on the stuff they see, they know it's not enough to make it spin at whichever speed, so there has to be something else at play, they called it dark matter, but really if there was dark matter going through the ceiling and through us, we would feel its gravitational force. And we don't.

Vor 2 years
St. Sol
St. Sol

Dark matter is a fudge factor, invented to reconcile the impossibility of explaining the rotational speeds of stars in galaxies by gravity alone (stars closer to the galactic center should move faster like planets in the Solar system) with observations of galaxies rotating similar to solid disks (outer stars actually move faster). Neglecting the EM force in space (which is 10^40 times stronger than gravity) is the cause of this predicament. Electric Universe successfully explains the galactic rotation patterns by EM effects alone, no dark matter is needed.

Vor 2 years
Peter Dziuk
Peter Dziuk

There seems to be a big limitation in knowledge of what is beyond the edge of our known Universe - if we knew that...

Vor 7 Monate
Stephen Paul King
Stephen Paul King

The vacuum energy has to be fantastically small for this explanation to work...

Vor 5 years
Brendan Cull
Brendan Cull

With respect to Knowledge of far distant planets and suns, it is said that we know more about the other planets in our solar system, than we know about what happens under our own seas.

Vor 3 years
Nick's Visual Poetry
Nick's Visual Poetry

Since the double pendulum's chaotic motion is very sensitive to initial conditions, and its motion can potentially (theoretically?) be replicated, I wonder if it is possible for it to start at the precise point of a previous cycle, initiated with the precise force of it. Do the starting point, force (or both) of the double pendulum also require infinite precision in order to replicate its motion? A man can certainly not do it, but would a robot optimized for that task be able to do it? I suppose even a close flight of a mosquito, a tiny variation of the air density or the tiniest air breeze or ground vibration would prevent the replication, so think tightly controlled conditions in a sealed room in a lab, with no people in the room or even close to it, and the robot would just move its hand both times in an identical way. Or, doing away with the robot, some slim mechanism designed for providing very precise motion and force. Still finite precision, but very high. Somewhere around the scale of the LIGO project.

Vor 5 years
brett knoss
brett knoss

It can be predicted to a certain range, quite accurately, It's certain to be within a certain circle. Yes, a pendulum could repeatedly be in a certain space, but there is no way that a pendulum always starts in the same place.

Vor 2 years
Cyberwizard Productions
Cyberwizard Productions

very cute presentation. Any computer professional could have told you that the CPPU of every machine out there isn't capable ot the accuracy you want. And it's even worse when you use 2 different machines, but - well - you'll get the same problems using two (supposedly) identical machines with the exact same hardware specs.

Vor 3 years
Dan Channer
Dan Channer

I think we have just found the next Dr Who.

Vor 3 years
Jim Lindow
Jim Lindow

@Travis Ryno what?

Vor year
Martin Grey
Martin Grey

Who???

Vor year
Manj Sher
Manj Sher

No

Vor year
Joseph Hall
Joseph Hall

No

Vor year
rohan sawhney
rohan sawhney

This should just be submitted as the audition clip

Vor year
Aristotle Change
Aristotle Change

Dark matter is what our universe expands into. The dark matter forces the universe matter through a smaller space which speeds up our expansion and produces dark energy from the friction of dark matter on the universes matter.

Vor year
galactus012345
galactus012345

As fan of astronomy, I was interested by this lecture. After 5mn, I was surprised to see that royal Institution can play a comedy around french bashing using Henri Poincaré. It is not the first time I am seeing these weird accent joke and specially from UK in science area. Rarely from the other countries. We learn in France that science has been built by the iterations of different research published and shared in the world. I never see in my education mocking jokes about great UK researchers. Royal Institute and Science deserve a more serious lecture compared to this. By the way, Henri Poincaré has provided some mathematical tool that helps Einstein demonstrating relativity. A global shared work for the benefit of science, did I say ? When a country is oftenly criticizing his old neighbour, can we imagine there is a bit a jealousy ?

Vor 5 years
maisie Carruthers
maisie Carruthers

Yeah the French have long been jealous of the British lol don't worry though they mock other English people to its there strange sense of humour

Vor 2 years
Apocalypse
Apocalypse

Andrew Pontzen: Brilliant! Thank You!

Vor 3 years
fluentpiffle
fluentpiffle

"History abundantly shows that people's views of the universe are bound up with their views of themselves and of their society. The debate in cosmology has implications far beyond the realm of science, for it is a question of how truth is known. How these questions are answered will shape not only the history of science, but the history of humanity." (Eric Lerner, 1992) spaceandmotion

Vor 5 Monate
Chrissy Philp
Chrissy Philp

To be utterly non-scientific ... I love this man. Clarity of perception plus a sense of humour is a great mix

Vor 7 years
Amoney Shredder
Amoney Shredder

I like sean carroll better

Vor 4 years
ParalysedGekko
ParalysedGekko

Then take a look at Sean Carroll's "The Big Picture" in this RI series. This is how comedy and science just add up perfectly. I wonder how that totally untalented Mr.Pontzen got access to such a fine panel of professionals that have been invited throughout all the lecture series. Calling that a "great mix": yeah, even if Donald J. Trump would give a lecture, there would surely be fans.

Vor 4 years
Geezerrrrrr
Geezerrrrrr

I would love to hear this spoken by anyone else

Vor year
jenna nelson
jenna nelson

I believe dark energy is a positive pressure exerted by the vacuum energy of space-time, and that what we are calling dark matter is merely the effects of dark energy on regular matter. A positive pressure exerted by space-time's vacuum energy predicts; -the accelerating universe -the expanding universe -we should measure there to be more mass than we can see matter being accountable for -matter in the center of a galaxy / cluster should have added relativistic mass, increasing its gravitational attraction, as well as its escape velocity -matter in the outer regions of a galaxy / cluster should be moving faster than we predict, sometimes faster than our predicted maximum orbital speed without flying out of orbit.

Vor 2 years
Scott Bishop
Scott Bishop

I am not convinced of the existence of dark matter. I do believe in gravity bending light.

Vor 2 years
jojolafrite90
jojolafrite90

Yep. Att 19:20. It's what I don't get. Everyone assumed it was made of particles instead of anything else, for example, it could be the influence of the mass of another space-time with it's own particles that don't directly interact with our normal mater (cf: dual universe theory). Or it could also be something else entirely. The point is that there ARE other possibilities to explain the excess of mass that we call dark matter than "Particles that weakly interact with other matter of our universe, but that are very massive too". I've never been a believer in those wimps... Some still try to find them with detectors (that are made of baryonic matter, of course, so they should hope the Wimp theory is the right one).

Vor 5 years
David Ogawa
David Ogawa

The point is that the dark matter does not clump into planetary sized objects, much less stars. It does not interact with itself or with our familiar matter, except through gravity. There is already an upper limit on how heavy a dm clump can be without already being detectable. The most sensible response to observations is that we need to extend the quantum theories to include "weakly interacting (no electric charge) particles with mass". Since we haven't needed dark matter to explain results from our "atom smashers", the energy (and therefore mass) of dark matter must exceed their energy capacity. This puts a lower boundary on their mass. Thus, "massive". Since _two_ galaxies have been found with *no* significant dark matter, alternate gravitation theories are invalidated.

Vor 3 years
Happy
Happy

Brilliant ! Thank you ! :))

Vor 4 years
Barry Retmanski
Barry Retmanski

One thing I don't understand, why does there have to be dark energy just because the universe is still accelerating? Imagine when you fire a gun for example, there is a time where the bullet will have to accelerate to peak speed, maybe the universe just hasn't reached the peak speed yet?

Vor 5 years
BFKC
BFKC

That 32Bit/64Bit precision comparison at around That 28:00 shows that computers are inexcusably bad. And keep in mind that this is still active in high-end graphical calculation, which has a very low Bit-precision, whereas high Bit-precision is reserved for professional rendering. This basically makes it impossible to speak of precise measurements and relations in a virtual space. Something that would definitely need incredible efforts to be overcome for some realistic world simulation...

Vor 4 years

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