737 Max UPDATE 20 March 2019

blancolirio
blancolirio

UPDATE to the Update from AvWeekly https://aviationweek.com/commercial-aviation/faa-reviews-enhanced-max-flight-test-data?utm_rid=CPEN1000000907970&utm_campaign=18947&utm_medium=email&elq2=7b24c0887f88426098a9f69399830ffc%20FAA%20Reviews%20Enhanced%20MAX%20Flight-Test%20Data

Vor Monat
Sandy Lee
Sandy Lee

+Andrew Kwayu Best idea i heard

Vor 13 Tage
Andrew Kwayu
Andrew Kwayu

+Sandy Lee yer, this plane should be operational in US only! The only place with capable pilots to operate a complex plane! Tell that to Boeing!

Vor 13 Tage
Sue San
Sue San

+euroblues2 *REALLY ??? i didn't know you could turn off Mcas separately?* Is there a SWITCH marked Mcas on /off that you can flip? I thought the investigators said the Pilots Fliped the Toggle Switches for the Auto trim cut off (which completely cuts off the power to the electric motors on the jackscrew that pitches the Horizontal Stabilizer up and down),that disables ANY Automation of the Stabilizer trim, forcing the pilots to set trim manually with those trim wheels. According to the investigators, Pilots did this and recovered Control, but then they decided to turn the Auto Trim On *AGAIN !!!* This is like seeing your car hit 100mph, when you set your cruise control to 65mph. So you turn off the Cruise Control and bring the speed back to 65mph, then you turn the Cruise Control back *ON AGAIN,* and the car accelerate to 100mph once more, and you *DON'T Turn off the Cruise Control off immediately,* but fight with it like you stupidly did before, with already faded brakes, and Crash !!!

Vor 17 Tage
Sue San
Sue San

+Phantom_ Wings i was Surprised to hear, that it was FAA, Who required that Boeing put the mcas in, as requirement of certification. Usually Boeing is the Boss of FAA. I am actually hating Boeing more and more, cuz i am finding out just how bad their manufacturing has been for about a decade. They only Assemble Planes at their factory, but all the major structures and components are made by uncertified contractors, many who dont even have cnc machines. Their factories look like fiberglass moulding factory in some third world country!!! Then the misaligned structures are hammer in their place AND PAINTED Over!!! I did not know it was this bad. Still in these two crashes, the fault has to go to the Pilots and people who let them work in the cockpit. Mcas or no mcas, you have to have the bare minimum Common Sense to turn things off, if it starts to act funny. As a Moral human being, a Parent can sue a car maker for bad cruise control, if their kid is hurt or worse, but should hold themselves moraly at fault, if they didn't value their kid's safety enough to learn how to disengage a cruise Control,,, by *pushing A button.*

Vor 27 Tage
Sue San
Sue San

+birdwing98 Fly Boeing V.i.p.s to Indonesia? I wouldn't even ride in a taxi, in Indonesia !!

Vor 27 Tage
Jumor Jetseter
Jumor Jetseter

Jackscrews thermal expansion factors are tested in a wrong temperature range , mainly in USA climate temp range . Hot climates temperature differencial on the ground where temp might be in up of 40+C° then freezing on high altitude down to 50-C° combined with poorly lubrication with grease not compatible with hot climate (where it melts and liqufies & runs , drips off the Jackscrew & the assembly leaving it " DRY like a chock " ) .This render the Jackscrews so thigtly squized by the assembly that it becomes unoperable even by brutal hand force of cranking trim wheels. Engineering of the Jackscrews is faulty not taking under cosideration the temperature variations and lack of proper lubrication of the Jackscrew's assembly . Lubrication should be automatic by the tubing pumping oil right into the nuts assembly under pressure periodicly with synthetic lubricant that stays liquid in very cold temperatures . It is not aerodynamic force that makes Jackscrews so hard to turn as much as Jackscrews being not properly lubricated & squized tight by extreme cold temperatures up on higher altitudes. Jackscrews design should be upgraded to consider those climate temperature variables & insure automatic lubrication . Also the termal expansion and contraction of Jackscrews and nut assembly should be same , made from the same metals with equal termal expansion factors. Jackscrews electric motors are over stressed to the point of failure trying to turn the extremely tightly squized the Jackscrews by nut assembly. Boeing must insure that Jackscrews are operating freely in a broad spectrum of temperature and stay lubricated at the ALL temp range . There was already the crash that involved Jackscrew's tread getting striped completely from the shaft , Can't recall in which air crash was that the factor leading to total failure of the Jackscrew. That was mainly due to poor lubrication maintenance of the Jackscrew.

Vor 8 Stunden
A Kvistad
A Kvistad

Copliments to you for the way you present this! Very solid and informational without judgement. Bravo!

Vor 6 Tage
Rebekah Leonard
Rebekah Leonard

Finally! I've been searching for am explanation re mcas situation. It's been 40 years since I got my ppl but have tried to keep up with improvements. So far the explanations are either too vague or way too complex....you strike a great balance so THANK YOU! This crazy old lady on the lake in upstate SC has subscribed and well on my way to being addicted! Journey mercies.

Vor 10 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Welcome aboard Rebekah!

Vor 9 Tage
Steve Coleman
Steve Coleman

Good guy, fine tech material.

Vor 10 Tage
Michael Black
Michael Black

My analysis is: - The source of problems Boeing seems to be having, is not essentially technical. - It 's in the governance. - Muilenberg is CEO + Chairman + President. Since 2015. - He basically oversaw or authorized 737 MAX first flight in Jan 2016. The 737 MAX series gained FAA certification in March 2017; which he also oversaw (& we're made to understand that FAA, for various reasons, delegated most of the certification work to Boeing itself). - This one man show doesn't make sense for such a big company. - Weak FAA oversight aside (how could they give basically one man safety decision making responsibility?), there doesn't seem to be any oversight mechanisms either within Boeing itself to check final decision-making - technical or otherwise - even at the very helm of the business.

Vor 12 Tage
p756
p756

I hate to sound naive but, aside from the pitch up moment that the MCAS was designed for on the Max 737 during take off; can pilot's hand fly the aircraft upon take-off and landing like they did in the past?

Vor 13 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Yes, easily.

Vor 13 Tage
Theo Bromino
Theo Bromino

Great updates. I hope you can take my questions. Is there a time when too late to turn off MCAS? is completely nose down beyond the envelope of no return to regain control? You may not know, but in your expert opinion, why did Ethiopian pilot or F/O turn on MCAS after turning off? Love your stuff. Enjoy your in depth analysis. Most informative. I'm a frequent flyer.

Vor 14 Tage
P. Gundaker
P. Gundaker

Poor mans Brian Cranston. Wha?

Vor 15 Tage
estguy2
estguy2

The Smithsonian channel, has a show Air Disasters, I think its free on Hulu, I got in the habit of checking NTSB reports, while taking private pilot lessons, lots of small planes fall out of the sky, almost 1 every day, I quit after 20 hours of lessons

Vor 15 Tage
Chad Simmons
Chad Simmons

If pilots on the ground ran the plane with remote control, fewer people would die in the crash

Vor 15 Tage
Neil Sunnell
Neil Sunnell

Since Boeing moved to Chicago there is no honor.

Vor 16 Tage
Russell Higgins
Russell Higgins

The good news would be poor communication between engineers test pilots feedback (presumably) FAA oversight (or lack of due to staff shortages) all curable by adding slightly to already astronomical cost of aircraft via fees from govt to aid FAA and ability of corporations to do due diligence knowing enhanced FAA would make all airline makers do same leveling playing field, which would be reflected by slight increases in cost of tickets to ALL aircraft. The bad news, manufacturer knew they had a problem and instead of highlighting and warning everyone so they could compensate, and everything man makes requires user operation to mediate issues, right from getting blisters from the first shovel, the 'we're perfect, admit no problems, never say no, don't rock the boat, fear for your job, illegal NDA's (if it's hiding a crime its illegal) and most importantly inc quarterly profit double digits no matter what' business culture just killed again. Hate to bring in politics but GOVT IS GOOD, regulations are good, gov't CONTROL of business is good at least until people reach universal saint hood.

Vor 16 Tage
Michael Maylor
Michael Maylor

Have the angles incidence 'limits' been altered at all on the latest max 8's 'slow moving' stabilizer, compared to earlier builds?. Thanks!

Vor 16 Tage
dcbee z
dcbee z

My grandfather flew Cessna 172 and Tiger moth, spraying farm's, due to asztma he was unable to serve in WW2. Although he wasn't the accomplished nor experienced piolet as yourself? my grandfather knew his planes and as a responsible piolet, you do not overlook that kind of mistake that would risk anyones life or aircraft as a piolet you should know your aircraft. You have survived and have done what you do because you are a responsible, accountable and capable piolet. You would not, ever make those kind of mistakes as has happened in this crash. Those Boeing's are state of the art and ultermately flying Manual or automatic, they are easy aircraft's to fly and navigate that is how they are engineered. And in that cockpit there are 2 to 3 occupants pioliting. These aircraft would have been many times flown and rested before being released. These anomolies would have been simulated and corrected. I acknowledge and respect your opinion as an accomplished expert, at the end of the day a good piolet is a good piolet regardless. Glider piolet's are as good piolet's even without all the protocol of who can fly what when. Flying is about physics, you either get it or you don't, just like sailing. Why are you making excuses for these people?

Vor 16 Tage
Lamar Winters
Lamar Winters

Thanks so much for the excellent briefing on the 737 Max MACS issue.

Vor 16 Tage
cliberg
cliberg

Very lucid presentation, THANKS!

Vor 17 Tage
biscuitninja
biscuitninja

Boeing knew about this many years ago oh, they just chose to do nothing about it. There were meetings in which this was discussed, quite a while back, and it was more than once brought up that there was no budget for a fix. Welcome to Boeing.

Vor 17 Tage
Aegean Epiphany
Aegean Epiphany

So you're saying it helps if there are 3-4 (10:34) pilots to help address an aircraft suddenly doing something autonomously that makes no sense? Isn't the main question: Why is the aircraft doing this in the first place? The world's gone mad...

Vor 18 Tage
Joseph Böhme
Joseph Böhme

One model for sure he flew was the Vought F8U-2NE (F-8E) Crusader/Bu  The first production F8U-2NE was delivered in September of 1962.  So he had a wild era for a while with it.  My older boss friend flew his photography plane out of San Jose a taildragger, I believe it was Piper's short-wing "taildragger" 4-seat PA-20 Pacer it was old and he started using it in the early 50's till 80's for sure. Arnold Del Carlo. Hole in the floor I'd shoot through.  He was not very careful with specific heights around Moffett and would get the NAVY warnings odd even thousands while he tried his best to stay on his camera runs for Silicon valley developers and Tech Corp buildings. I felt a bit vulnerable being a non pilot in the back seat area/ with no seatbelt snapping away , he was born about 1924.

Vor 18 Tage
Joseph Böhme
Joseph Böhme

Mr J Brown, is there anyway you can shoot aerial of dead trees in the N Bay region through Napa etc where the timber should be stripped out, But is that timber valuable enough to get some use to break even or better.  My cousin Neal Henderson is a retired kinda 83+ (Iron man contestant) still skinny & hard body cyclist and Northwest Airline pilot/ former Korean era (Marine) Navy F8U-3 pilot I believe their VA 104 was meant to be a Nuclear Weapon Dropping Squadron, since he said the made the low and up to heaven run and were to supposedly peel off as the bomb went up further then fly out of the blast area, which he said they could not do well because the bombs were potentially getting too powerful. Even at 3 miles a minute airspeed. Then just in time at early Viet Nam era he went to NW airlines and was assigned commercial transport in the Flak zones of Viet nam in and out quick. Then Flying the Alaska route he later saw the fallout from time to time from those pesky Russian Nuke bomb tests. Lots of fun flying I beleive the Vought XF8U-3 Super Crusader III ,

Vor 18 Tage
The Hawk Flew in RC
The Hawk Flew in RC

An AA seven three Max captain told me the other day that the Ethiopian F/O had 200 hours total flight hours. If that's true, it would explain a lot.

Vor 19 Tage
Michiel Valens
Michiel Valens

How is it possible the pitch-up moment caused by the engines is bigger on the MAX than on the older types, while the engine was mounted higher on the wing, suggesting that the vertical distance from the engine to the center of gravity got reduced (suggesting a smaller pitch-up moment)?

Vor 19 Tage
Michael Maylor
Michael Maylor

Oh! jackscrew found trim fully nose down. At best, how long for the jackscrew to rewind to near middle of it's travel?.Well too long! is my guess, 'cos those little elevators have got little or no chance and we all know the rest. Nice report.

Vor 20 Tage
John Joseph
John Joseph

What do you think about Boeing having sold the malfunction warning btwn the 2 AOA indicators as an OPTION?

Vor 20 Tage
Peter Cyr
Peter Cyr

How many incidences of pilot initiated mcas cutout have there been in the max 8?

Vor 21 Tag
blancolirio
blancolirio

1

Vor 20 Tage
Peter Cyr
Peter Cyr

What if you shut off the mcas when the stab is in an extreme position? The elevator may not overcome.

Vor 21 Tag
Michael W. Perry
Michael W. Perry

The Mentour Pilot channel on episode on YouTube that describes that scenario. One of the horrors of MCAS was that it could drive the stabilizer to the point where no amount of elevator input could overcome it. In such a case, with the stabilizer motor turned off, you and your co-pilot would have to manually crank the stabilizer trim frantically to restore the stabilizers to a normal and do so while continuing to fly the plane. And yes, it may be too late.

Vor 20 Tage
Peter Cyr
Peter Cyr

Sweet ragwing Luscombe.

Vor 21 Tag
Kenneth Kustren
Kenneth Kustren

Honestly, somehow,... I knew before you finished the sentence,... that the C-141 job was a highlight of extreme adventures in your life. As an armchair-pilot with 10k+ hrs in all aircraft of MS FLIGHT SIMÛLATOR, AIRCRAFT & SCENERY DESIGNER, COMBAT FLIGHT SIMÛLATOR, PC PILOT Magazine. Since MS Flight .... my addiction has eased. Everything is fine, I have my fix.

Vor 22 Tage
brian preval
brian preval

they f....d up big time

Vor 23 Tage
brian preval
brian preval

so it's a bodge job!

Vor 23 Tage
Chuck Higgins
Chuck Higgins

Thank you for a detailed description of the MCAS system. My vote that Lion and Ethiopian pilots lacked total knowledge and training of the MCAS, not aircraft, but Owners fault. I air crewed Boeing B-29's over Korea, sometimes questionable, but 4000 hrs, and here I am. TRAINING.

Vor 23 Tage
DD More
DD More

I've been following the information and I don't fully understand why the pilots are not trained to compensate for the Auto trim procedures. I think fault lies on both Boeing and pilots. Boeing gave too much control to the autopilot and the pilots were not trained properly.

Vor 24 Tage
Metalgear SolidSnake
Metalgear SolidSnake

"The MCAS is a system that automatically lowers the nose of the plane when it receives information from its external angle of attack (AOA) sensors that the aircraft is flying too slowly or steeply, and at risk of stalling. In the Lion Air crash, the MCAS forced the plane's nose down more than 24 times before it finally hit water, according to a preliminary investigation by Indonesia's National Transportation Safety Committee, which also found the system was responding to a faulty sensor."

Vor 24 Tage
Metalgear SolidSnake
Metalgear SolidSnake

"According to Ethiopian Airlines CEO Tewolde GebreMariam, pilots transitioning to the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft from older 737 models were required only to undertake a short computer-based training program prescribed by Boeing and approved by the FAA."GebreMariam also said the flight simulator that pilots trained on to learn how to fly the Boeing 737 Max 8 plane did not replicate the MCAS automated feature that crash investigators are scrutinizing." I think better training is needed, and it have to mandatory to take these trainings! Boeing needs this, because i can´t see boeing max taking another crash.

Vor 24 Tage
Metalgear SolidSnake
Metalgear SolidSnake

A very informative video. thanks But i guess the FAA need to be very sure that the plane is safe, before they release it... and i guess the boeing max will be much safer because of these crashes?

Vor 24 Tage
Christopher Crepon
Christopher Crepon

Could you possibly make a video about the cargo 767 which went down in Texas not long ago? Thanks for these videos

Vor 24 Tage
John Justjohn
John Justjohn

as XL -airways A320 when it crashed.. also auto trim issue, and pilots needed to trim nose down , even got a message: "man pitch trim only", but instead doing the right thing they asked: what is the plane doing . ... so Ethiopian could learn from that and lion crash , if they lose pitch control, to think about trim first and auto pilot.. thats been such basic education for US pilots.. . amazing that Asian and African , and kukrikistan pilots have so bad training..

Vor 25 Tage
Peter Beaumont
Peter Beaumont

Great video, thank you for your incise input as to the cause of these crashes and loss of life

Vor 25 Tage
Joan B.
Joan B.

Great informational update, Juan, even for a layperson!

Vor 25 Tage
Ed Hughes
Ed Hughes

Training and Lights. IMO no airline should be allowed to put un trained personnel in the cot-pit. Cost is not a object when it comes to 1 or 2 guys/gals entrusted with millions of dollars of equipment and 100s of lives.

Vor 25 Tage
Arthur poluan
Arthur poluan

Very impressed with your cleared explanations

Vor 25 Tage
James Zimmerman
James Zimmerman

Juan, Thanks so much for another wonderful clear assessment of the 737-Max situation. It's things like this (no redundancy in the data input, etc.) that must make pilots like you just shake your head.

Vor 26 Tage
arlen raasch
arlen raasch

I expect there are some very upset aircraft engineers at Boeing. Safety is supposed to be job one. I expect that perceived economic factors led to the current system being put in production. An indicator showing that the AOA sensors are not in agreement was an option available to airlines, but at an increased price. Ditto for a display of the AOA. This would go far to aid pilots to diagnose rapidly the cause of the problem with the current MCAS design. I agree with the proposed fix, there is no need for the MCAS system to have the ability to drive the stabilizer to its maximum nose-down position.

Vor 26 Tage
Felix Hinze
Felix Hinze

Interesting... Great report. thank you! One would think that in the 21st Century people would have learned from past mistakes. I mean, how many innocent lives have been lost over the millennia just by rushing things, ALONE! If what you say is true then Boeing is ultimately and directly responsible for both these crashes and the lives lost! This has far reaching and serious repercussions for Boeing (and even the FAA). But it's ultimately Boeing's airplane and the fact is, they introduced a plane which is flawed by design, into the market!

Vor 26 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Felix Hinze Every generation makes new mistakes, each slightly different. Hubris is a given.

Vor 26 Tage
stephen bird
stephen bird

Hi, I think you should look at tropicaltidbits.com and see the 2 feet of rain coming to Oroville. Best of luck.

Vor 26 Tage
OneKindWord
OneKindWord

1:20 Juan begins his flight bio. Ends at 4:44

Vor 26 Tage
Quan cong
Quan cong

Its is a eerie to contemplate when the confidence in human engineering gone too far. Can we trusted the artificial intelligence enough over the human being .to let its take over the control the live and death of its master ...this is a painful reminder when we get too confidence in our engineering.thats is when we let our guard are down. Thars is Then mistake are happening. In this case many life are lost .some job will be lost. Head will roll . people lost faith in Boeing. Some experts don't believe so .because Boeing and Airbus are so dominant in this field . but never forget the russian mc 21 single ille aircraft is a very capable aircraft. The Chinese is not too far behind with the C919 . They are a determined country. with one party system government and 1.4 billion people behind them.A one party system mean when they set their goal or objective on any direction then thing'swill moves swiftly and decisively. we the US should never let our guard down ..must put aside the difference and work together as one nation. If we can get over the notion of you red and I'm blue . Every one it's not easy task but American is a build by the most gifted , talented , strong will people. I'm sure we will overcome this.. its take a leader a role model. white is the big brother Then then the black., the middle one is Mexicans the youngest I guess is asian.. every one should work together as one then America can become a world leader again ..I'm a immigrant who are very fortunate to got a chance to come here and enjoy the American dream that the American people who work hard ,fought and created. I am forever grateful ...I sincerely hope and pray the big company will bring back manufacturer job back to the states then every can have job.. specially Boeing .. Im sure Boeing can over come this and quick..hopefully Boeing will come out with a better, safer airplane for the benefit of the American working people. .

Vor 26 Tage
Brad Haugan
Brad Haugan

Electric Trim Cut out switches have been in use for decades on all 737's. To reduce a potential stall, information from the AoA, angle of attack indicator is fed to MCAS and (with out pilot input) and if these conditions are met, (angle of attack is high, autopilot is off, Flaps are up) MCAS operates the electric trim, visible by the pilot, as the trim wheels are large 8” wheels that physically spins as the horizontal stabilizer moves upward at .27° per second up to 2.5°, then cuts out for 9.26 seconds and repeats. During bad AoA data, The Pilot is expected to recognize this condition as unwanted horizontal stabilizer movement or runaway. There is not a lot of things that move the nose down. start of Boeing bulletin issued Nov 6, 2018 "The Indonesian National Transportation Safety Board has indicated that Lion airflight 610 experienced erroneous AoA data. Boeing would like to call attention to an AoA failure condition that can occurred during manual flight only. This bulletin directs flight crews to the existing procedures to address this condition. In the event of erroneous AOA data, the pitch trim system can trim the stabilizer nose down in increments lasting up to 10 seconds. The nose down stabilizer trim movement can be stopped and reversed with the use of the electric stabilizer trim switches, but may restart five seconds after the electric stabilizer trim switches are released. Repetitive cycles of an un-commanded nose down stabilizer continue to occur unless the stabilizer trim system is deactivated through the use of both stab trim cut out switches in accordance with the existing procedures in the runaway stabilizer NNC. It is possible for the stabilizer to reach the nose down limit unless the system inputs are counteracted completely by the pilot trim inputs and both stab trim cut out switches are moved the cut out position. Additionally, pilots are reminded that in an erroneous AOA can cause some are all of the following indications and effects continuous or intermittent stick shaker on the affected side only, minimum speed bar red and black on the affected side only, increasing nose down control forces inability to engage autopilot, automatic disengagement on autopilot, IAS disagree, over ALT disagree, AoA disagree alert if installed, feel differential pressure light. Operating instructions- in the event of an un-commanded nose down stabilizer trim is experienced on the 737 – Max8, in conjunction with one or more fo the above indications or effects, do the runaway stabilizer NNC ensuring that the stab trim cutout switches are set to cut out and stay in the cut out position for the remainder of the flight. Note: initially higher control forces maybe needed to overcome any stabilizer nose down trim already apply manual stabilizer trim can be used after the stab trim cut out switches are moved to cut out.” end of bulletin My Personal opinion, I find it irresponsible and negligent that some pilots after the Lion Air Crash did not 100% fully understand and comprehend the bulletin. Does Boeing or Airline Company's have to hold the hand and walk these professional pilots through the bulletin. Do the pilots not take any personal responsibility. I personally was interested to learn all the details of the Lion air crash, and what caused it without any bulletin from Boeing, (I am not a pilot, an ex commercial fisherman), yet we have pilots flying the Max 8 with no or little interest in why one of their aircraft crashed. It disgusts me. Its not like these pilots drive a taxi full-time and to pick up a little extra cash flying a Max 8 on Weekends, this is all they do. Get with the program! I will cut pilots a little slack before the Lion air crash, but after, not a chance. Even my girl friend, which took interest in the Lion air crash, as we discussed it together. As soon as we heard some of the details from the Ethiopian Air crash, my gal offered, this “sounds like auto trim control again, too bad they just hit the cut out switches, and trim manually”. This from a person that has zero to do with airplanes, flying, or aircraft industry. Does Boeing issue bulletins in the language spoken in Ethiopia? Are Boeing bulletins in English only? Do airline’s have safety officers that talk to pilots about bulletins. Do the two crashes have anything to do with English as second language?

Vor 26 Tage
Harrison Blake
Harrison Blake

Would it help the pilot if the MCAS reported that it had added input? The pilot is usually of the opinion that he has control of the bird, and that he can over-ride the auto systems. A real bi*ch of a problem to find out that you have to fight the bird for control. We used to say (in the Navy) that systems always needed to be stupid proofed, made the least complicated that normal people could operate the system.

Vor 26 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

The story keeps getting deeper. This article (firewalled) states that MCAS is used on the military version (KC-46) of the B767: https://aviationweek.com/defense/boe...cd1cc979ac68a7

Vor 26 Tage
magentaline
magentaline

How do you know there’s a pilot in the room? He will tell you.

Vor 26 Tage
Rodolfo Ayala
Rodolfo Ayala

Great 👍 educator 👨‍🏫. Thanks 🙏🏻 🇵🇷🇺🇸🙏🏻.

Vor 27 Tage
Hoghead Run 9
Hoghead Run 9

In another related matter I would like to have your insight on the flight that took off from London. It was destined for Germany but ended up in Scotland. It seems that the flight crew had their heads up their you know what’s. It also tells me that computers are pretty good at flying planes without the pilots. I appreciate your insight and honesty in your videos. Thank you.

Vor 27 Tage
bytejuggler
bytejuggler

Article about that third pilot: https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lion-air-boeing-737-pilot-20190319-story.html

Vor 27 Tage
Walter Graeser
Walter Graeser

Juan, as retired flight dispatcher in Switzerland, I am of course still interested in what's going on in aviation. Bravo for your clear speaking ! Congrats for your explanations that also a non-pilot can "digest". Eager to learn more from you. Kindest regards - Walti

Vor 27 Tage
Bill LV Eightfivefive
Bill LV Eightfivefive

Juan, I have been an aviation buff since I was a child,I live in Rio Linda under the approach to Mcclleland park . I see lots of cool aircraft. Today we were overflown by a u2. Nothing to do with the content of this video but I had to share this with you. There are lots of cool stuff that flies around this area.

Vor 27 Tage
blipco5
blipco5

Juan, have you seen that GoPro footage of a smaller commuter plane crashing into the ocean off the coast of Hawaii?

Vor 27 Tage
Gaylen Phillips
Gaylen Phillips

Best video I have watched in years. Perfect explanation of what is at issue. Very well executed example of the mcas  system. Just a great video!!

Vor 27 Tage
Andy Hull
Andy Hull

Mr. Brown, Juan, I am gonna do some thinking about the act of journalism by a non-journalism and its value to our modern world. This is my first post and maybe last, but I wanted to add my gratitude for your very fine work NoSierraNev issues you are involved with. Our modern world makes it possible for your to be current in the Max issue. Awesome, dude! (Okay, off the philosophical.) Here is a link to a video about piloting in a tight situation, the need for familiarity with the aircraft, physics, and psychology for successful flying, i.e., bringing it back safely. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBpqvPujZgM For folks who read this far check out 19:25—22:15 about the "startle" factor and what it takes for pilots to train around that. (I cannot imagine too many things more startling than flying into a fire with a tanker following you.) Juan, I also really like all of your assistants there at the Blancolirio World Headquarters. They are real and very likeable.

Vor 27 Tage
Richard Purcell
Richard Purcell

I love e the 757 My Favorite

Vor 27 Tage
USM-4 KAGNEW
USM-4 KAGNEW

Wow, only 40 seconds to figure out the problem and cut out the stall protection according to the simulator recreation of the Ethiopian airlines crash.

Vor 27 Tage
James Lambert
James Lambert

Great info, can't wait for the next update. I have worked both aircraft engine controls design and power (electrical) generation turbines, in powergen turbines the primary controls have 3 sensors that enable 2 out 3 voting logic to determine sensor validity (sometimes called triple redundancy). Always wondered why aircraft don't require that. I know on airliners the 2nd engine is considered the backup so with engine controls having 2 channels the other engine provides the additional backup control channel in a sense. But for flight controls, like stab trim and MCAS, only a pair of AOA's is used. Also, certain sensors like resolvers (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resolver_(electrical), allow some sensor integrity detection to occur such a "sum of squares" logic to assess sensor health and disable choosing that sensor for control as well as registering a fault code for a defective sensor that would require maintenance replacement.

Vor 27 Tage
LockheedStarliner
LockheedStarliner

In Test of Boeing Jet, Pilots Had 40 Seconds to Fix https://nyti.ms/2TYDNqP

Vor 27 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

The answer to how much time the pilots have to intervene in the case of runaway MCAS trim on the MAX is about 40 seconds: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/25/business/boeing-simulation-error.html

Vor 27 Tage
trader0108
trader0108

I would appreciate it if you would give a report that explains what actually happened regarding all of the fires in the oil storage site outside of Houston in Deer Park, Texas, and explain why all of this continuing disaster happened. Or a recommended Internet link would be appreciated. Did the company violate public trust and maintain a public disaster site, that was waiting to eventually happen ?

Vor 27 Tage
Mike Bennett
Mike Bennett

I don't know if you've seen this video but it is quite interesting and focuses on the 737NG. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWxxtzBTxGU&feature=share

Vor 27 Tage
Mike Bennett
Mike Bennett

I appreciated you reviewing your history flying both civilian and military. I was at McClellan while you were at Mather flying the tweet. I'm surprised you can still hear. Oh, they were loud. Thanks... :-)

Vor 27 Tage
pete t
pete t

Beautifully explained. You are my no.1 source on this issue. Thanks.

Vor 27 Tage
Joseph Howard
Joseph Howard

I hope all the people who were saying the plane is safe and this is a giant conspiracy by Airbus to make Boeing look bad finally realize how their narrow mindedness and bias are useless when it comes to safety. Excellent video. Thank. you.

Vor 27 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Joseph Howard And also those blaming the pilots.

Vor 27 Tage
Joseph Howard
Joseph Howard

FAA - I am here to make sure you are building this properly. Are you building it properly.? Boeing - oh yes absolutely . FAA - Good job carry on.

Vor 27 Tage
Ronald Craft
Ronald Craft

Juan, does MCAS share any software or facilities of Boeing's FBW aircraft, I.e., is it an adaptation of an FBW component. I ask, in light of the similarity of the Amazon 767-300 crash with the two 737 Max crashes. In all three instances the flights ended with a steep dive into the ground, possibly all at full throttle. Also, you mentioned the engines on the 737 Max aircraft were mounted higher and forward of the original engines. We're they also mounted closer to the fuselage.

Vor 27 Tage
Ronald Craft
Ronald Craft

Juan, the following link contends MCAS is not unique to the 737 Max aircraft. It states a version of MCAS is used on 767 USAF tankers: https://www.mro-network.com/airframe/boeing-s-767-tankers-also-use-augmented-pitch-system

Vor 19 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Ronald Craft MCAS is unique to the 737

Vor 27 Tage
Jeff Sweeney
Jeff Sweeney

I need help regarding your commentary around 15:40. I may understand why adding throttle will cause the nose to pitch up on these types of aircraft. The line of thrust from the engines is below the center of drag so adding power will create a moment on the aircraft that causes the nose to pitch up. But, that can't be right because raising the engines as in the 737 Max would reduce the distance between the line of thrust and the center of drag and the nose would tend to pitch up less. Help! Cognitive dissonance!

Vor 27 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Jeff Sweeney The fact that there was some lift was known, the magnitude of the extra lift was larger than expected. Many links in this story. CFD is far from perfect.

Vor 26 Tage
Jeff Sweeney
Jeff Sweeney

Gordon, the extra lift should not have been unexpected. Boeing must have been doing CFD during the concept of this aircraft. I suspect the engineers at least knew about the extra lift at high AOA.

Vor 26 Tage
Jeff Sweeney
Jeff Sweeney

Thanks Gordon. I'm trying to understand why this bandaid MCAS was added to begin with.

Vor 27 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Jeff Sweeney Juan didn't explain the whole story with the engines. Its complex, and not relevant to the crash Investigation. Technically it is caused by unanticipated lift on the large engine nacelles at high AOA that cause the pitch up moment, independent of engine thrust.

Vor 27 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Jeff Sweeney bigger engines.

Vor 27 Tage
Isaac Willis
Isaac Willis

Thanks for making these vids. I haven't flown in 30 years and I'm about to get on a plane next week. Long ago I was briefly aircrew on the P3-C, the AO, got bounced around the can in the back 300' above the ocean. Loved it. Grew up flying on Pan Am 747's all over the globe as a kid. So, yeah not afraid of flying. But these latest two crashes have been rather unnerving so your vids are just spot on. Thanks again. My mother's 83 and it's going to be good seeing her. Been a long time. Got lots of confidence in the FAA and our commercial aviation because of you. You are also the future of journalism. Congrats on your success. Wish you much more, Captain.

Vor 27 Tage
James Armstrong
James Armstrong

The title of video should be Crashing Planes by Computer - smart computer takes over control & pilot watches as computer kills itself & all aboard. Engineers think the angle of attack sensor is smarter than the pilots so lets surprise the crew when there is a failure of one instrument.

Vor 27 Tage
Berns Buenaobra
Berns Buenaobra

Software testing fault simulation testing and finally real-time testing did they that everything no short cuts - looks like they miss the potential problem failure mode analysis key point Boeing is building so many orders trying to beat deadline after all that money and possibly missing very minute details. Now Indonesia is cancelling 49 planes on this model.

Vor 27 Tage
Geir A. Granviken
Geir A. Granviken

The startle effect you mention, and probably the confusion in an MCAS upset situation, are very valid points - and should answer all those who claim how "easily" the pilots should have solved the situation. Even though I have never worked in a cockpit with more than two pilots, I also agree on the third pilot perspective - I've seen that as jump seat rider a few times, and the simulator instructors claim they see everything we are doing when sitting behind us…. :-)

Vor 28 Tage
Dave Muth
Dave Muth

Thank You Juan for what you do. Great information.

Vor 28 Tage
Jorge Chiu
Jorge Chiu

THe manual turning of the jackscrew is very hard for just the first officer to do, in order to level it up to your capitan, while running the correcting list. He had to step in and help in his side in order to get it to his level for him to operate the alerones. I don't know, if you loose time here you can loose your plane quick

Vor 28 Tage
Gergely Kereszturi
Gergely Kereszturi

Clear, precise and understandable as always - even for a foreigner. I've been following you since the early days of the Oroville dam disaster. You should teach how to create media, how to speak understandably, how to prepare with information and how to pass that on. Thank you for your efforts!

Vor 28 Tage
Ted Cook
Ted Cook

My questions are many. What does the speed trim do, and has or could it malfunction intermittently like the MCAS. I assume speed trim counters the upward rotation (torque,moment) of the engine thrust. A speed trim malfunction on take off could be a big problem. Then the stated reason for MCAS, trying to mimic the feel of the 737NG. My question is how different is the feel of a short model to a stretch? 757-200 to a -300, a 737-600 to a -900, or a 787-8 to a 787-10? Are the rudder, trim, and elevator travel lessened on the stretch models to make the feel the same, or is this not an issue? And, I think you should do a whole extended video on all the aircraft you have flown. That is a comprehensive resume of aircraft and manufacturers.

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Ted Cook The speed trim function on the B737 operates under manual flight, to assist the crew. The auto pilot is a whole different story. Its a real mix of systems built on top of an entirely manual aircraft.

Vor 27 Tage
Ted Cook
Ted Cook

Constant speed by adjustment of trim? Cruise control for airplanes using the trim instead of the throttles?+Gordon Richardson

Vor 27 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Ted Cook Speed trim tries to keep the speed of the aircraft constant after a change in pitch. It tries to keep a smooth horizontal flight path, rather than a roller coaster.

Vor 28 Tage
MoFreckles
MoFreckles

Oh we will trade you our Tennessee rain for your California rains ;)

Vor 28 Tage
Rayan
Rayan

Very detailed and updated information Juan! Congratulations! Please keep us updated! Thank you!

Vor 28 Tage
Pseudorandomly
Pseudorandomly

Next I hope we get to see a pilot's-perpective video on the British Airways plane that mistakenly flew to Scotland instead of Germany.

Vor 28 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Pseudorandomly “Doh”

Vor 27 Tage
Chappy H
Chappy H

Makes me wonder if the same type of thing may have happened to Giant 3591. 767 instead of 737 but still a Boeing aircraft. Haven't heard any updates since this channel on 3/12. Juan, your explanations/instruction are simply outstanding! Glad I found this channel. Blessings from a U.S. Air Force chaplain.

Vor 28 Tage
James Moreland
James Moreland

Hi Juan, I observed C-17 at the Davis Monahan air show over the past weekend. This aircraft has a total of six angle of attack instruments, three on each side of the nose. Interesting, not aware of how these instruments are utilized in the flight control system. In nuclear power plants, it is common practice to use multiple instrument inputs for critical control functions. The inputs require 2 out of 3 or 2 of 4 inputs to insure valid parameter input to initiate a control action. This method eliminates an incorrect or failed instrument input.

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

James Moreland The A350 also has a large number of nose probe measuring devices. It has a powerful flight computer to integrate and verify all of this information, along with GPS and inertial navigation.

Vor 28 Tage
peterincgy
peterincgy

These 2 crashes are regrettable however they were both new aircraft flown by crews not familiar with them, as Juan said there are switches to turn off the stabilizers. Quality of crew training not evident in these low end airlines.

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

peterincgy A safe and reliable aircraft should not depend on the pilots to recover from a computer generated malfunction.

Vor 28 Tage
Robert May
Robert May

Boeing designed "new bigger heavier" engines for the 737 MAX, that were more fuel efficient, and capable of trans Atlantic flights. Boeing did not redesign the frame of the aircraft to allow for the extra weight, and therefore the plane would not fly on a level angle. The nose tended to go up, and the new MCAS computer system, made the nose go back down to level. The MCAS system was fed "bad" information from the AOA ( angle of attack) sensors, and this caused the nose to point downward, all on it's own, without it being needed. These engines had to be mounted differently - more up and forward to fit. In order to stop this, the pilot's must "disengage" the MCAS system and manually take off and land. A lot of pilots in North America already have had to do this. It seems pilots in North America were better trained, and understood this, as this MAX 8 has logged many flights and miles in advanced countries, with no accidents, as the pilot's are better trained for emergency situations over here.        Boeing is responsible for training pilot's properly, and making them aware of the new technologies, and how to disengage them if needed. Boeing did not even tell the airlines about MCAS until after the 1st accident. Boeing's at fault. Boeing will eventually have to "redesign" the frame of the plane, to accomodate the bigger engines, but in the interim - a quick software fix will be implemented. Of all the videos I've watched on Youtube, this is by far the best and most thorough, and totally explains everything in an understandable manner, so great job by the maker of this video -"well done." I guess a lot of my comment just repeats what has been said in this great video -- but that's OK. And just to think they want "driverless cars"-- yikes, I just shudder to think of all the deaths that will because by bad sensors, technology etc. Are we to lazy as humans to drive our own cars ? Not me, I will never ride in one - nor own one.

Vor 28 Tage
Jerry Glen
Jerry Glen

Can pilots turn the m.c.a.s. Off  preflight?  Just curious?

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Jerry Glen MCAS is software designed to run in the background during manual flight, and cannot be turned off. Juan can explain the implications.

Vor 28 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

no...I'll cover this in an update.

Vor 28 Tage
Ramon Cardona
Ramon Cardona

The only element not covered was the failure of maintenance rules and regulations to ground an aircraft with reported flight control problems. Add the factor that, while not reported, the prior flight captain did not declare an emergency on the flight control issue and returned for landing but continued the flight. These are safety elements that must be airline policy over revenue and over the fear of pilots suffering possible repercussions over an aborted flight. (Ret. military and commercial pilot).

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Ramon Cardona With the Ethiopian crash there was no prior warning of instrument failure on previous flights.

Vor 28 Tage
Jo So
Jo So

Hi Juan. Congrats for all your excellent vids. I just viewed this short piece : https://youtu.be/4koccb8suOQ Something worth looking at among the MCAS design idiocies : the MCAS apparently switches btw the 2 AOA sensors on each flight or aircraft turnup cycle... which may have sth to do with why the maintenance test before the Lion Air crash (and just after a MCAS/AOA/trim malfunction had been reported on the latest flight, causing the trim switch to be turned off) detected no pb and reported not having been able to reproduce any malfunction... Not sure about this info nor what maintenance tests actually were done then, but worth keeping in mind along the progress of the Lion Air investigation. Note that whether or not it caused the test to fail at detecting the AOA sensor malfunction, this one-sensor switching on each flight, if true, is just one more totally meaningless design choice...

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Jo So All of that is true for the Lion Air crash. For the Ethiopian crash there was no prior warning.

Vor 28 Tage
Tomáš Bouzek
Tomáš Bouzek

Boeing should be sentenced to dead for making this suicidal system operational on 737 MAX. They should named it KAMIKAZE.

Vor 28 Tage
Deano TheSaxman
Deano TheSaxman

Turns out that the Ethiopian pilots probably didn't even know about the MCAS situation .... Not even the Ethiopian Airways Flight sim was setup with MCAS .... ? How does this situation even exist ... Boeing has to take the blame for this surely, this aircraft was suppose to be same as the rest of type ... ! The new MCAS training was on an I-pad ... !!! Mentour-pilot is doing a very interesting series on the implementation of a nose down MCAS situation and a work around situation ... VERY interesting and informative ... The main problem here lies with the fact that Boeing virtually own the FAA ... Boeing type approve their own aircraft .. which leads to Boeing being Judge, Jury, & Executioner of their own aircraft ... I Used to work for Pratt & Whitney in Ireland as a CNC machinist and then HEAD HUNTED for parts Repair & Development ! Using FAA/ CAA regulations ... Boeing also has a current Parts manufacture Scandal in the offing, parts that were suppose to have been NC / CNC machined, were actually being manually routed out using hand tools using a pattern - yet the parts were signed off as being NC / CNC machined ... Parts tractability has always been a big issue in the Aerospace industry .. But the paper trail for parts manufacture in Boeing seems to be very lax ... ! Boeing has already had a history of Airspeed Pitot problems with the 737-800 series aircraft ... that was suppose to be fixed. Surely the MCAS system uses Airspeed to predict a nose up stall situation .. And then forcing a nose down in a stall ! We also have a situation with MOOG flight systems Fake parts, unauthorized parts not produced by MOOG being used in MOOG flight systems ... The whole situation of Boeing is broken here ... there needs to be more accountability of Aerospace, letting an Aircraft manufacturer type approve / safety check it's own product, is just sheer Insanity !

Vor 28 Tage
Roberto Pignato
Roberto Pignato

Great video Juan, congratulations and please keep informing people in this easy and objective way about aviation safety issues. Once again great Job!!

Vor 28 Tage
Jokneez
Jokneez

How enlightening. I thought the Clinton's activated the "QSR" chip since some of the passengers on the Ethiopian flight were UN environmental & food politicians on there way to a conference. There was a guy from Huntington Beach, CA that wanted to start an Orphanage in Haiti. That's a red Flag. On the Lions flight there were also Diplomats on that flight. So, fishy to me since American & Southwest uses the Max 8 w/o any crashes. United uses the 9. I guess since ur the Pro this opens up another side of the story. There's always 2 sides, no 3 sides: ur side, my side, but God knows the truth. 😇 Thanks 4 the informative video.

Vor 28 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

Don't bite off on Wackadoodle Fake News stories.

Vor 28 Tage
B A
B A

As an engineer, it seems inherently dangerous to base such a safety-critical decision on only a single, partially-redundant sensor reading. Engineering spidey-sense would say four sensors and two computers AT A MINIMUM, since the benefit of simple parallel redundancy is roughly to the power of number of redundant components. _Two is one, one is none._

Vor 28 Tage
Ed Miller
Ed Miller

Excellent! Thank you.

Vor 28 Tage
B A
B A

Ever fly around the Davis co-op CAFF airport?

Vor 28 Tage
blancolirio
blancolirio

yep.

Vor 28 Tage
greg halliwell
greg halliwell

I like that Engineering oversite. WOW i'm in

Vor 28 Tage
Eric O'Brien
Eric O'Brien

I have read elsewhere that a "yank the control column to disengage automation" feature exists in earlier versions of the 737 but is ABSENT in the 737 MAX. And that the pilots of one or both crash planes DID execute the "yank" gesture... but to no effect. (That is, doing so did not disengage the MCAS or remove power from the horizontal stabilizer trim control motor.) Can anyone say if that is true? If yes, then the removal of that "shutoff" feature would be another thing that Boeing failed to make known.

Vor 28 Tage
Gordon Richardson
Gordon Richardson

Eric O'Brien Yes, the yank the control column feature does exist. However it only disables the auto pilot trim not MCAS, which requires all power to be cut to the horizontal stabiliser. This detail difference may have doomed the pilots.

Vor 28 Tage

Nächstes Video

American Rotary Phase Converters: Making your own Three Phase Power

22:59

American Rotary Phase Converters: Making your own Three Phase Power

Keith Rucker - VintageMachinery.org

Aufrufe 10 000

THOR’S HAMMER Vs. UNBREAKABLE BOX from 45m!

13:41

THOR’S HAMMER Vs. UNBREAKABLE BOX from 45m!

How Ridiculous

Aufrufe 1 967 611

Trying Edible Slime Recipes! w/ Rebecca Zamolo

16:01

World's scariest plane landings.mp4

43:27

World's scariest plane landings.mp4

Grace John

Aufrufe 12 000 000

Stolen or Captured Fighter Jets Mig 15 F 86 Mig 21 Mig 25

14:56

Stolen or Captured Fighter Jets Mig 15 F 86 Mig 21 Mig 25

The Joint Forces Channel

Aufrufe 1 900 000

This Thing is SMOKING HOT! Someome Crank Up the A/C!

33:41

10 Last Words From Black Box Airplane Crashes

15:36

10 Last Words From Black Box Airplane Crashes

Top 10 Archive

Aufrufe 1 500 000

The Boeing 787: Broken Dreams l Al Jazeera Investigations

48:23

10 FAILED General Aviation Airplanes

12:26

10 FAILED General Aviation Airplanes

FloridaFlying

Aufrufe 593 000

Air France 447: Final report on what brought airliner down

07:09

Air France 447: Final report on what brought airliner down

Captain Chesley Sullenberger

Aufrufe 1 200 000

Free Dead iPhone 7 - Can it be revived?

8:47

Free Dead iPhone 7 - Can it be revived?

Hugh Jeffreys

Aufrufe 177 114

OUR HOUSE FLOODED... | ALEX AND MICHAEL

10:24

OUR HOUSE FLOODED... | ALEX AND MICHAEL

ALEXandMICHAEL

Aufrufe 57 053

Galaxy Fold with Unbox Therapy

10:03

Galaxy Fold with Unbox Therapy

Dave Lee

Aufrufe 643 463

Super Capacitor Rocket

18:56

Super Capacitor Rocket

Tom Stanton

Aufrufe 431 606

The influencer who made her instagram her life

16:39

How are they making money on this?!

12:02