5 Most Annoying OUTDATED Business Rules in Japan

Let's ask Shogo | Your Japanese friend in Kyoto
Let's ask Shogo | Your Japanese friend in Kyoto

Do you want to work in Japan? Why and where would you like to work?☺️ ・ In this channel, you can take a closer look at Japanese traditional culture, tips upon traveling to Kyoto, and social problems in Japan. So learners and lovers of Japanese language and culture, be sure to subscribe to enjoy more content! Please check out the description box for more videos recommended for you! Thank you again very much for watching!

Vor year
Nern Guan
Nern Guan

Maybe I will work when we exit the lost decade. Wait.. Which one.

Vor 4 Tage
India Countryball
India Countryball

I, personally, would love to work in Japan, but not for all my life, like a sort of temporary job. I would like to be one of those ninjutsu teachers in a training school, if possible.

Vor 29 Tage
Kelly Burket
Kelly Burket

I have a question for you, and it may take more space to tell the story behind question. Do you have an email for such, or should I just try to put it all on a YouTube comment?

Vor 4 Monate
valdo DeBarros
valdo DeBarros

i lived in japan for two years for us army. i love everything about their culture and customs. i wish to move there after my military career is over. i lived in zama in kanakawa prefecture. if i moved there in the future i probably like to live down south like kyoto or hokaido in the north. even thou tokyo was was nice too.

Vor 5 Monate
JCgamer18
JCgamer18

not really. id probably want to work in europe like sweden or norway which have some of the happiest working people

Vor 6 Monate
Marcel Susanto
Marcel Susanto

I once worked as an engineer in Singapore. One of the older manager explained to me the difference between Germany and Japan regarding long working hours. He explained that Japanese boss would compliment his employee for every overtime. Only with overtime you can climb the corporate ladder in Japanese company. Contrary to Japan, German bosses think employees who do overtime are inefficient people who can't manage their time and resource. The funny thing was when I asked him "What about Singaporeans?" "Singaporeans are the worst. Singaporean boss will scold you whenever you don't do overtime. On the other hand, they never compliment you. Please forget about climbing the corporate ladder using overtime, it is just the minimum standard for them!"

Vor year
FlyOnTheWallflower
FlyOnTheWallflower

@Small Pp sorry to hear that. Maybe move to another country? 🤷‍♀ ^if possible

Vor 4 Tage
Small Pp
Small Pp

As a singaporean student I realise I am screwed when I enter the job market after reading a bunch of negative essays on the work culture here

Vor Monat
c
c

Actually the situation about overtime is quite similar in Germany to Japan. But I agree, there are at least some people who think overtime is inefficient... But the thing is in many jobs you have so many tasks that you actually need the overtime to get your daily tasks done. Fortunately the laws restrictions towards overtime get stricter and it's checked if people obey the laws.

Vor Monat
R.M.
R.M.

Dominican Republic work culture is very similar too. Long unpaid work hours nor going up the corporate ladder.

Vor 4 Monate
Kazama Sho
Kazama Sho

Singaporean and Malaysian are the same; 99% of them are actually from Malaysia who grew rich or rooted a subsidiary company here, so to ensure continued prosperity for themselves based on the 3x currency rate difference. This is also why full fledged local born Singaporeans don't fancy such things being done.

Vor 5 Monate
Suriel08
Suriel08

"Are we ever going to be attacked by bandits during a business meeting?" Yes, quite often. But they are already inside the room.

Vor 11 Monate
Paulo Azuela
Paulo Azuela

@Yume It would be hilarious for US to do that

Vor 9 Tage
Yume
Yume

@Katherine Kelly that’s probably a concern in US 😅. In Europe or Japan that’ll be extremely unlikely

Vor 6 Monate
PamperedPanda
PamperedPanda

lololol

Vor 6 Monate
Katherine Kelly
Katherine Kelly

Sadly, the first thing I thought of was workplace shootings where an armed employee goes on a rampage 🥺

Vor 8 Monate
Terrapin Alive
Terrapin Alive

Genial

Vor 9 Monate
Priximus225
Priximus225

-young people are forced to work and basically live at their workplace - "WHY ARENT THE YOUNG HAVING CHILDREN!?"

Vor year
Sojo
Sojo

@Kurai Kenshi Your average millennial is working more hours for less money, than previous generations at similar points in their lives. But profits for the company have increased drastically. Your argument only protects CEOs and Shareholders. It hurts ALL workers. Additionally, any study on work efficiency suggests doing about 6 hours of work in a day, with several breaks, for maximum efficiency. More time and fewer breaks = less gets done with more mistakes. Instead, corporations in all sectors have put more and more workload onto all workers, including the work of multiple workers who are not hired or given hours, so the company can save money. It's all about short term gains for shareholders and stock values. If you want to love the current system, go for it, but you should be adamant to fix the glaring flaws.

Vor 3 Monate
Gork
Gork

@lordblazer america does not force you to get student loans, you can always go to a trade school or community College and pay much much less for a degree that is in high demand, and gives you a viable skill.

Vor 7 Monate
Tonixxy
Tonixxy

@Kurai Kenshi 1973 - boomer kid makes 22.5$ on weekends, gas is 1$ per gallon, milk 0.25$, bread 0.2$ average house 50k. 2021- Highly dangerous underwatrr welding that you need to be experienced divet and have licenses gets you 30$ milk is 2$ bread 1.5$ average house 300k...... Do you get it?

Vor 7 Monate
Kurai Kenshi
Kurai Kenshi

@Tonixxy yeah people in trades make that much. Underwater Welders make $30/hr on project.

Vor 7 Monate
Tonixxy
Tonixxy

@Kurai Kenshi 16 year old boomer was paid 17.5$ in 1973 and 22.5$ overtime. Ppl now min wage and 60 hour weeks...

Vor 7 Monate
Firebreath56
Firebreath56

I really like how honest you are about all of these issues. It seems like a lot of people aren't willing to talk about them, but they're so important, so I respect you a lot for doing that!

Vor year
Aoi Kemono
Aoi Kemono

Considering the premise of a lot of isekai anime is the main protagonist literally dying of overwork and being reincarnated in a fantasy world to live a "slow life", this is hardly a secret.

Vor 5 Monate
Robson
Robson

Deny to talk about problems "that other japaneses would dislike to talk about" is a virtue too haha. That's why you should not take serious videos like that from Yuta inquiring ppl in the streets. Most are not being honest with themselves by replying.

Vor 8 Monate
Matt Tube
Matt Tube

Same

Vor 8 Monate
Berend Muller
Berend Muller

i will honestly never forget my period of 5 years working in japan. about 30% of my time in the office was spent playing games or solving sudokus on my computer, since i'd be done with my actual assignments but the rest wasn't finished yet. you couldn't even assist colleagues in your department or team since they weren't 'your' assignments. some days i'd just be in the break room all day or chilling with the colleagues in the business archives just because i'd hit my weekly quota and be bored to death. it's honestly insane to me how a lot of japanese businesses claim to be team oriented by being completely non-team oriented at all.

Vor 8 Monate
Bocah Dongo
Bocah Dongo

@Moriarchy being a snob All "initiative" in Japanese culture counted as "snob". Everyone hold their back for someone to do it, and nobody to do it

Vor 2 Monate
Moriarchy
Moriarchy

What would you say would be the consequences of taking the initiative and creating a localized work culture where all the people in your "group" (could be a whole department or just to your physically closest colleagues)? As you help each other finish your assignments and exchanged favours to each other so all of you had time to do other things?

Vor 3 Monate
icepicjoey
icepicjoey

This is why in anime the parents are never home.

Vor year
ハルちゃん
ハルちゃん

haha I now found out!

Vor 12 Tage
Apuspeak
Apuspeak

The mangaka missed the carefree youth (and the absent of the parents figure to remind them all the rules)

Vor 3 Monate
Aoi Kemono
Aoi Kemono

They are literally not even in the same city. Children have a lot of autonomy in Japan.

Vor 5 Monate
Lotus Negra
Lotus Negra

One of the reasons. The other is that the artist don't want to draw them, and they are not a part of the story.

Vor 5 Monate
hr1meg
hr1meg

icepicjoey :)

Vor 7 Monate
Jakob Fredriksson
Jakob Fredriksson

This explains a lot why people felt unease while me and my friend were travelling around in Japan some years ago. We tried take a spot far from the entrance in elevators just because *we didn't want to be in the way* for hard working Japanese. All we tried to do was to *show them respect* but after watching this I finally understand why it backfired so hard =)

Vor 9 Monate
On Life and Love
On Life and Love

I thought the position closest to the elevator doors were the best too because you get out easily

Vor 2 Monate
Andrea Koroknai
Andrea Koroknai

well, that would clash with Hungarian etiquette, because here it's rude to 'be in the way'

Vor 6 Monate
Terrapin Alive
Terrapin Alive

Jakob..I'm afraid European logic was wasted on those fellows

Vor 9 Monate
foinelsfred
foinelsfred

Many European countries, that give 5 weeks of vacation right of the bat upon hiring new employees, and that have a 35 hours max workweek, actually have significantly better productivity than countries at the opposite of the spectrum.

Vor 10 Monate
Kyle Hill
Kyle Hill

@karambiatos This is partially why Nintendo sucks so bad with online both for gamers and remote workers thus no BOTW2 news or really any other news for that matter. I bet they have gotten very little progress based on trailer V2.0. V1.0 seemed more serious.

Vor 5 Monate
karambiatos
karambiatos

@Marco Meijer As someone whose been looking for work in the game industry, the dutch companies give the worst pay and benefits in western europe, bar none.

Vor 5 Monate
Dragonax
Dragonax

EU mandates on its' members minimum of 20 days paid vacation

Vor 7 Monate
metallsnubben
metallsnubben

@Marco Meijer If there's one thing the pandemic has taught me it's that I can waste just as much time at a workplace as at home, except at home I'm simply less bored. If you get your tasks done, why not play all the billiards you want!

Vor 7 Monate
Nirrini
Nirrini

@Marco Meijer I’m from the Netherlands too but I have no knowledge about your work sector. Depending on the type of job and/or sector, working weeks can vary from 28 to 36. That being said, I have an older niece who used to work as a college professor for the Hogeschool Rotterdam. Her standard workweek was 60 (!) hours. On top of that, she had a household to tend to. It caused her to burn out and change to a different job.

Vor 7 Monate
Dolphinboi - Play Monster Rancher
Dolphinboi - Play Monster Rancher

Lack of sleep leads to incompetance. Incompetance means low productivity. Low productivity means no work done.

Vor year
PageMonster
PageMonster

@EmanuelM ALdoileaCont Don't use that ugly word.

Vor 9 Monate
ClausMystery
ClausMystery

NO SHUT UP. A SILENT WORKER IS A HAPPY WORKER. - Orthodox Old School Boss.

Vor 9 Monate
Maro Cat
Maro Cat

And it should be dependent what work hours are actually needed or if someone just needs to be on the hotline. if so, hae a rotation who stays on the hotline. Less woorktime well comensated an looking more on efficiency and whats to do is a more effective way and less frustrating. Boredom isnt nessesary, and if hotline, do rotations with one person. If that much work is there, stilll overworking is still bad for workers. If that day more works has to io be dont than usual, have a flexible less hours another day thing maybe when, its really nothing to do.

Vor 11 Monate
reverant tangent
reverant tangent

The scariest ghost story I've ever heard was of someone who died and continued to go to work for 50 years.

Vor year
Gary Hernandez Pulido
Gary Hernandez Pulido

@reverant tangent cope

Vor 7 Monate
ClausMystery
ClausMystery

@reverant tangent Except it's true???

Vor 9 Monate
Derp Nep
Derp Nep

They seriously keep working after passing...? That is legit scary

Vor 9 Monate
njål sand
njål sand

He's practically a ghost

Vor 10 Monate
Edoras Marauder
Edoras Marauder

@reverant tangent Paranoid, are we?

Vor 10 Monate
Ludwig Wittgenstein
Ludwig Wittgenstein

Younger people should be able to open their own business, with new “rules” that actually work

Vor year
Tonixxy
Tonixxy

There's gov to strangle you with taxes and regulations.

Vor 7 Monate
Mike D
Mike D

Good idea in theory, but in practice you usually need a loan from a bank to start a large scale business. And the people who own and run banks, also old fashioned boomers.... So, there's that. Your other options, (1) make your company into a co op (which has its own issues) and pay your employees in equity in the company. This would work if they have a high risk tolerance and/or lucky enough to have rich parents that they can live off of while doing their thing. (2). Your company is your side hussle, but you still work for a traditional company as your main income. Since you're not doing any real work, and just there pretending to work, you might as well work on your side hussle while at work; and just hope you don't get caught.

Vor 9 Monate
Spugelo
Spugelo

@AVeryLazyTechPriest That's not going to fly in western countries most of the time, not just countries like Japan. Only time you don't need experience is when you start something new, since nobody has experience.

Vor 9 Monate
AVeryLazyTechPriest
AVeryLazyTechPriest

@Spugelo there are young people across the world that manage it just fine, there's no reason that the Japanese should be excluded from such ability. E-commerce for example.

Vor 9 Monate
Cybernetic Butterfly
Cybernetic Butterfly

@Spugelo I can't agree. I see it as a personality issue. Some people have the personality with the attitude "I'm sure I can figure it out as I go". Alot of people who start businesses are this type.

Vor 9 Monate
Michelle G
Michelle G

It's basically slave labor, and extremely stressful. I can see why no person wants or even has time for kids! 😬

Vor year
ClausMystery
ClausMystery

@Lady Grey Literal boomer culture

Vor 9 Monate
Szentinel Torony
Szentinel Torony

Some of these things are common in Hungary too, so if someone claims that "WE ARE A COMPANY WHICH PREFERS TRADITIONAL HUNGARIAN VALUES", than you need to do one thing: RUN!

Vor year
Oatmeal
Oatmeal

@Shivam Chandrol India also has joke IT pay and internships you have to pay for

Vor 10 Monate
Ai Skye
Ai Skye

@Shivam Chandrol The only time I didn't ask for overtime pay is when I had days I'm late previously and only up to how long (per hour) I was late. This is not in the company or country's law, more personal. I'd take it if they still pay me but I wouldn't demand it otherwise.

Vor 10 Monate
CUBETechie
CUBETechie

@Katarina Tibai what does it mean or what can I expect in this case? Greetings from a neighbor country 😁

Vor year
Shivam Chandrol
Shivam Chandrol

Lol thanks for insight. Guess that’s why people need Trade and Labor unions. In my country work hours generally constitute of 6-8 hours depending upon jobs . Generally overtime are paid I’m from India.😊

Vor year
FunkNinguémCat
FunkNinguémCat

I LOVE how Shogo's videos are so well structured!

Vor year
جعفر ماهر محمد
جعفر ماهر محمد

and his delicate way of speaking is amazing

Vor year
Rod Beauvex
Rod Beauvex

It's really nice seeing someone actually talk about the work culture in Japan and actually discuss not only why it is so oppressive, but how it had gotten to that point. I had been wondering this for awhile.

Vor 11 Monate
Sylvia S. S.
Sylvia S. S.

Paper contracts... it is really ridiculous. When some contractors who didn't have an office came to work in my country and contracted me as a interpreter/secretary for the trips they would be making here, they came and gave me the printed contract thinking that I would sign without asking for any changes even when it was the first time I could read it, and I needed some changes to be made, of course, They were really upset that the paper contract was going back without my signature and that I told them that I would send them the pdf file when they made the corrections.

Vor year
Vizeran
Vizeran

The economic social situation mirrors perfectly the situation here in the states. Old money controlling the pathways to "success". Hail from Texas! Also love your video and subbed keep on going man!

Vor year
Vegpwr Shlominator
Vegpwr Shlominator

That does not mirror the United States but possibly certain fields, I worked in aerospace for 5 years and the company was similar as far as overtime and raises but other fields are quite flexible.

Vor 4 Monate
Bryan Hernandez
Bryan Hernandez

"Customs and Traditions are basically Peer Pressure from the Grave" I taught those words are rude, now i kinda agree..

Vor 11 Monate
Aoi Kemono
Aoi Kemono

It's only half right. You don't reinvent the wheel. That's what tradition comes from. But you also learn to get out and push the dang car when it gets stuck in the mud.

Vor 5 Monate
Wako Tamura
Wako Tamura

I feel No.4 is ridiculous. Signature is more practical, isn't it? Actually, my parents are strict about No.3, which is driving me crazy.

Vor year
Rambling
Rambling

Interesting about the higher/lower positions - I work in the UK, which has some of the most relaxed business cultures in the world (for example, everyone from CEO to janitor is referred to by first name), but those are _exactly_ the same positions I would have used if in a small place with one of my bosses. Here, though, being closest to the door isn't about being attacked. It's being the most convenient position to be sent to do errands.

Vor 10 Monate
Psychotic Gamer
Psychotic Gamer

i suppose the major difference is how much they take it seriously

Vor 7 Monate
Yogipony
Yogipony

These rules seem somewhat universal. I guessed them right without knowing much about Japanese culture

Vor 8 Monate
Stephen Aitcheson
Stephen Aitcheson

Looks like its probably gonna be the Self-Employed/Freelance route for me. Regardless, this video was incredibly informative and insightful Shogo. Cheers

Vor year
Sordahon
Sordahon

Shogo can I ask you about that mendatory drinking after work and what happens if someone doesn't want to, doesn't drink at all or has no need wasting time when tired after work for socialising.

Vor year
Oatmeal
Oatmeal

@hulCAWmania Universe Of 田中 they'll often keep trying to force you into it, similarly if you have any dietary needs/preferences

Vor 10 Monate
hulCAWmania Universe Of 田中
hulCAWmania Universe Of 田中

this! yes. as a half japanese, who may or may not work in a japanese company. i'm curious since i live a Straight Edge lifestyle of no alcohol.

Vor 11 Monate
Hydro Aegis
Hydro Aegis

This sounds like a literal boomer country. Oh wait-

Vor year
TKAD Legend
TKAD Legend

HAHAHA BOOM BOOM

Vor 6 Monate
Phillip Mulligan
Phillip Mulligan

Indeed it is

Vor 8 Monate
lynda y
lynda y

i guess the boomer culture is not exclusive to the west :O

Vor 8 Monate
Tatratram
Tatratram

That moment when you get all three "where to stand/sit" examples correct.

Vor year
D. San
D. San

I got two. Once the operator was explained the taxi one was obvious. Also guessed one right based on how their letters go left to right. Really treated this like a game... I had just been playing ace attorney the night before

Vor Monat
leilatimeful
leilatimeful

I got them all right. I know it’s a pain and overly complicated, but it’s also kinda nice to have explicit rules. There are many cultures where there are taboos and cultural rules about what is “respectful”, but they’re implied and can vary from person to person. So you’re left having to sense and guess what the polite thing is.

Vor Monat
Angela Chouinard
Angela Chouinard

@Marcia Estrella I got all three but I think it's from watching to many samurai movies. As you said, it made sense (even though it's ridiculous).

Vor Monat
Marcia Estrella
Marcia Estrella

Same, it was really easy. And it made sense (even though it's ridiculous)

Vor 4 Monate
_ annoyed
_ annoyed

@BabyConan41 Haha, yes... it's not like with the TV-remote...

Vor 10 Monate
bacintom
bacintom

Lifetime employment used to be standard everywhere, but it has become uncompetitive and unsustainable. There were good sides to it too.

Vor 9 Monate
Xavier Sibaja
Xavier Sibaja

Meeting face-to-face is also important in Mexico. When you meet a client and after some drinks the client says something like "ok you brainwashed me" it means you got the account.

Vor year
NerdGeek Cosplay
NerdGeek Cosplay

@Xavier Sibaja I’m Hispanic and yes my parents ( especially my dad ) has raised me like this.

Vor 6 Monate
Xavier Sibaja
Xavier Sibaja

@rudy-ero-sensei It is what it is.

Vor 10 Monate
rudy-ero-sensei
rudy-ero-sensei

Yeah bro as someone that used to work sales in Mexico I can confirm. I sometimes had to drive like 2 hours just to meet potential customers

Vor 10 Monate
Xavier Sibaja
Xavier Sibaja

@Andrey Chaves León En mi experiencia, usualmente cuando te reúnes en un restaurant para lograr un contrato/ venta ya hay una referencia que existe la posibilidad que se logre. La reunión en el restaurant es para establecer si ambas partes pueden trabajar en confianza. Si habrá “congenialidad.’ En el mundo clásico que existía en México era la oportunidad mostrar tu respeto a tu futuro cliente. Un ejemplo: trabajaba para un museo en California, venía a la CDMX para concretar apoyos para una exhibición. Mi contacto en México puso antecedente a una empresa muy importante que apoyaba la cultura. Cuando llegué a México con mi jefe recibimos una invitación para una función de gala en Bellas Artes. Mi jefe no quería ir a una “fiesta” lo obligué y en el intermedio nos presentaron al segundo del mero mero. Platicamos 20 minutos y al final brindamos con champagne. Llegando a California recibo una llamada de un representante de esa empresa. En el almuerzo el ofreció un apoyo de 50 mil dólares.

Vor 11 Monate
Andrey Chaves León
Andrey Chaves León

Aver como es eso?

Vor 11 Monate
Mickey Sieveke
Mickey Sieveke

His bit about stamps and contracts gives me flashbacks of the three years I lived in Yokohama. I got a drivers license while there, which meant I had to get a Japanese ID and license through the city hall. Which meant, as a foreigner, I had to get a stamp, and have someone help walk me through this whole process. Same when I rented a house, set up utilities, got a phone and opened a bank account. Sometimes, I'd get a pass as a foreigner and was allowed to just sign my name. But I found that carrying around my stamp made things easier, and the other party less nervous.

Vor 8 Monate
Sclade Night
Sclade Night

If i were to make a bussiness branch at Japan, I need to remember to abolish some of the outdated & inefficient rules during the working hour.

Vor 10 Monate
Zeff
Zeff

I suspect that this relates a lot to why Tokyo is massively overgrown. Having to do everything in person makes everybody living in the same metro a lot more essential. The idea of all meetings and interactions having to be in person would be kind of insane in a nation as physically large as the US.

Vor year
Keith
Keith

Well, no. Tokyo is so large because it has a large harbour (see New York City as being so large for the same reason), and it's located on the Kantō Plain, the largest flat area in the country and thus the only place that has the room for massive expansion without climbing mountains, and farming. By 1720, one estimate is that Edo was the largest city on the planet.

Vor 5 Monate
Maximilliana Francine
Maximilliana Francine

It sounds like some things are meant to just create employment. Like the paper contract thing. Where I live and hsve worked in both Europe and Africa, it is also more polite for the boss to say something like 'okay, I'll wrap this up'. If the staff are close, they will politely ask if they can leave. But just upping and leaving isn't really done

Vor year
Hardware John
Hardware John

Yeah that's how I feel about pumping your own gas being illegal in New Jersey. We all kinda know that it's safe to do it yourself but the fact its illegal and someone gets paid to do it for you means that there's more entry level jobs across the state.

Vor 3 Monate
Andrew Sock 🧦
Andrew Sock 🧦

It doesn’t matter where in the world we are, to express freedom is frowned upon. It is the origin of domination.

Vor year
A B
A B

@Paul Hunter where there has been humans the desire for some to rule or have power over others has been a goal. There is a balance but humans can't find it.

Vor 6 Monate
Paul Hunter
Paul Hunter

Upon that post in must agree. Even in American corporate culture there's a hierarchy of lower workers, middle managers and top executives. This has not changed since early days of 1900 Centuryn

Vor 8 Monate
Jeff Whiting
Jeff Whiting

I wonder how much of these rules and procedures are designed with risk aversion in mind. That is, some of these situations in the US can cause a bit of confusion and minor embarrassment if left to chance. It's a common thing in the US, and it's generally no big deal when it does occur.

Vor 10 Monate
Michael Spitzer
Michael Spitzer

Of all these, I feel the one "sitting farthest from the door" is the most relatable to me as a European. After all, it's also the position from where you can observe every new person entering (bandit or not), and you don't have the door in your back, which means nobody will be staring over your shoulder. I even get why the positions where you do the menial tasks are not "boss" positions. But having to stand near the door AND exiting last from the elevator? That's just inconvenient.

Vor 2 Monate
Leona Gonnelly
Leona Gonnelly

Thanks Shogo! Very important to be aware of these customs, hopefully the crisis will push changes in the work environment.

Vor year
dhemong
dhemong

i love the funny cartoon illustration, the old man riding the rickshaw and the young eating the grass is my favorite.

Vor year
ଅନ୍ୱେଷ アヌウェッシュ Anwesh 언웨서 安威世 অন্বেষ अन्वेषः
ଅନ୍ୱେଷ アヌウェッシュ Anwesh 언웨서 安威世 অন্বেষ अन्वेषः

Real life Senpai - Kouhai relationship in a nutshell.

Vor year
na me
na me

27:03 for anyone wondering

Vor year
にこまふらー ♪ Nicomuffler
にこまふらー ♪ Nicomuffler

They are from Irasutoya. Their illustrations are the best

Vor year
Bamidele
Bamidele

"It's also the fault of young people too because they've been raised to not question anything." Well, no. That's literally the fault of those teaching them lol

Vor 9 Monate
legend
legend

@CvnDqnrU I don't disagree, but I think every generation has said this.

Vor 5 Monate
CvnDqnrU
CvnDqnrU

New generations are the ones with the motivation and the duty to change the world for the better. Older people are too dependent on the system to change it, but they have the duty to share their wisdom with the youth so they don't change the world for the worse.

Vor 7 Monate
Takano Rebecca
Takano Rebecca

True. Children are raised to become a “puppet” or a “robot”😒 I’m a Filipina married to a Japanese, been here for 24 years. I always remind my 3 daughters to learn how and when to say “No” and not to be so much inclined to “adapt just to be accepted”. My eldest will start her teaching job in primary school next year. I told her to teach and let her students show their real selves and have the freedom to voice out their thoughts as long as they do not harm anybody.

Vor 9 Monate
Jerome Stith
Jerome Stith

I like the fact things are done face to face. When I was leaving Japan, the land lord, and all utilities came out to my house on my last day. I thought that was so cool. Everything is taken care of... no waiting on the phone, no emloyee forgetting to close your account. The work seating arrangement is a thing in the US too.

Vor 11 Monate
AceOfSpadesProduc100 himself
AceOfSpadesProduc100 himself

It reminded me of Aggretsuko, where these standards applied to at least the accounting department of Retsuko's company, the department she works in. The CEO was spineless and barely did anything to reprimand Ton (the accounting director) for his abuses.

Vor 2 Monate
DefCon 7
DefCon 7

I live in the U.S., and I see some of this in my own work history. Not every company I have ever worked for was like this, but the lifetime employment system, the overtime, the system and culture of obedience to superiors, and a whole bunch of other rules are all present at some companies.

Vor 5 Monate
Y D
Y D

Shogo: "Are we ever going to be attacked by bandits during a business meeting?" Me: "Challenge accepted."

Vor 10 Monate
Kevin Smith
Kevin Smith

Obviously the bandits have simply given up because they were only able to slaughter the least senior office workers. Once they noticed any relaxation of proper seating, the bandit attacks would obviously resume.

Vor 8 Monate
Meryem Adam
Meryem Adam

Year 2015 January 07...Paris...😪💔🥀.

Vor 9 Monate
Jose Sanchez 1
Jose Sanchez 1

Great video Shogo san, I enjoyed the contents with relevant info and with real points of view in what’s happening in your country … I’m an author - foreign been in Japan for three decades and always wanted to express issues like the ones you expressing but I thought I wasn’t the best qualified person to do it… that’s why I’m content to see your video… we should do a video together with a topic about sanitation cleanliness as everyone outside Japan admires this of your country but after been here for certain amount of time, I have different opinion :) cheers

Vor 9 Monate
Ben Jackson
Ben Jackson

There’s always room for improvement in every culture. I hope Japan fixes there’s soon.

Vor 3 Monate
LizChanFish
LizChanFish

What I keep hearing about is that workers are obligated to go out to bars with their bosses/superiors. I imagine this causes a lot of alcoholism in the work culture.

Vor 10 Monate
slocad11
slocad11

Shogo, I like your videos because I can share them with my English language students. I used to live in Japan, and we often compare our respective cultures (Belarusian, Russian, American) and Japanese culture. I love the way that you speak at a good pace for listening practice. It is all very clear and they are happy to listen and summarize and discuss afterward. Thank you!

Vor 9 Monate
Cosmos Provider
Cosmos Provider

I didn't know about any of these "position in the room" rules, actually never heard about it until now, but i still got all your quiz right because that's what made most sense to me. Quite proud of myself on this one, but indeed this is kind of backward, except for the one in the car because people tend to behave the exact same everywhere in the world even if it's not a rule outside of japan.

Vor 9 Monate
Charem Chavrutah
Charem Chavrutah

Your story about the old business partner who needlessly insisted on an in-person meeting during the winter is especially telling, considering what you've recently shared with us. I wonder if she even realized the literal, physical pain she was putting you through. I suppose, in a twisted way, it's a good thing she didn't expect you to stamp any papers right there.

Vor 7 Monate
syukur pambudi muhadi
syukur pambudi muhadi

haha, I also recently needed to do a face-to-face meeting. Though, rather than a normal business meeting, it was more like a brainstorming session for three hours, which IMO wouldn't really work well with a virtual one.

Vor year
Jean-Baptiste Lasselle
Jean-Baptiste Lasselle

I highly appreciate your channel, both extremely respectful to traditions, culture and values, and sharing thoughts about hem at the same time

Vor 11 Monate
Lars
Lars

As a german I would really have a hard time living in Japan Though I have a high respect for japanese people for their politenes, I wish that would be more of a thing in western culture...

Vor 10 Monate
helioscore100
helioscore100

Explained very lucidly, sensibly and beautifully Shogo san. Really easy to understand. It’s nice to learn more of ground realities when it comes to Japanese culture. I like the way you specifically contextualize and explain events with historical significance or bearing and present it using animated character as you explain.

Vor 10 Monate
_TKD_
_TKD_

I don't know how it is in the majority of companies in Norway, but I know that where my dad works there is an "every minute of overtime is a minute of paid leave you can cash in later" kind of rule, which I've always thought sounds nice

Vor 22 Tage
Silent Screamer
Silent Screamer

It is really nice to hear you saying all these things. I've been here for more than 16years and I had to learn that business card and other etiquette stuff. I don't mind so much the etiquette but regarding all these outdated habits, especially the paper contracts and ankou (inkan) stuff... It drives me crazy... the long hours, inefficiency, and overall system always disgusted me. I've resolved to open my own business as I could never work in a Japanese system. It's sad that so many managers still don't understand things have changed... Japan is definitely not that great place to be it used to be. I like my life here because I work for foreign companies and have my own business but the magic of Japan has totally disappeared from my heart...

Vor 9 Monate
Roland Dean
Roland Dean

As to seating. I never sit with my back to the door when I eat out in public...it makes me uneasy and vulnerable to do so.

Vor year
Carmelo Pappalardo
Carmelo Pappalardo

In Italian culture seating is similar in a room.

Vor year
MAYA TERESA JASINSKI
MAYA TERESA JASINSKI

For stamps, maybe it’s best to buy one and keep it forever. I had to use my stamp many times to rent my new apartment. I didn’t know if they were so specific about the characters on the stamp but, I made sure to just keep one and buy new red ink-filled sponges. Hope that helps everyone. Make sure you don’t lose it either! Even I forget to bring my stamp to the bank or something in case of a weird event. Though, apart from the apartment situation, I never had that problem. Maybe if you explain to them that another bank or someone else let you sign instead of stamp something, this usually works and is useful but, not all the time so, be careful and just bring your original stamp just in case. (American Foreigner Living in Japan)

Vor year
Jean
Jean

I used to think the same regarding meeting in person. Now, after a few years of professional experience, I do see the point. Meeting physically does change for the better the dynamic of the relationship. Feels more real and humane afterwards, and not just a "mean to an end". I would not actively push for it, but should a convenient opportunity to meet in person rise, I would systematically seize it, even if the situation does not require it.

Vor 9 Monate
Alex aoeu256
Alex aoeu256

What about meeting in VR CHAT or Discord?

Vor 10 Tage
Musashi Senku
Musashi Senku

This culture still seems very much alive and well in my experience. I dont think its going anywhere, at least for the next 1-2 decades.

Vor 13 Tage
MarkFromHawaii
MarkFromHawaii

The exchange of business cards has become ritualized. When I worked as an engineering manager at our local utility, there were times when we met with several representatives from a Japanese company. We would stand in lines and great each other one on one and exchange cards and bow, then move down the row. We had to hold our cards so that our name and title faced our counterpart. Confusion ensued as to who would present their card first and bow. One must also take the time time to read and "admire" the other's card. As there were maybe a dozen on each side, you can imagine that this took a good part of a two hour meeting. Oh, and one more thing I recall, the Japanese presentation slide deck was nearly impossible to read as every square inch was filled with technical information, even for diagrams.

Vor 9 Monate
Kate
Kate

#5 is so frustratingly common here in canada too; the number of times i have complained "this could have been an email" after a meeting to coworkers is almost exactly the same number of times ive been dragged out of work for a meeting.

Vor 28 Tage
Manči Μανώλης
Manči Μανώλης

I like your channel a lot. Very interesting, in depth information presented in a fun and educational way! 😊 I was wondering if some of those work related issues also might due to the live-in jobs that existed before WW2. What do you think?

Vor 5 Monate
Charles Buron
Charles Buron

Thank you Shogo-san! Now I know I'll never ever be willing to work in Japan or stay for too long. It sound stressful and horrible.

Vor 3 Monate
Sergey Valerievich
Sergey Valerievich

You would hope that as time goes by the corporate culture will change but it may be locked in a circle of hazing by new generation of mid or senior management. Adopt or look for better working conditions!

Vor year
TheDarkNate
TheDarkNate

as long as the elite benefit from subjugating others with the current culture, itll never change, unless most of the working class do a massive labor strike

Vor year
Somin Kim
Somin Kim

The upper and lower seats idea is found in Korea as well, although mostly as a courtesy and something insisted upon by people mid-60s and beyond. At some of the more hoity-toity restaurants the staff will point out which are the high seats upon a party's arrival. Hopefully it'll die out soon.

Vor 4 Tage
Kitsune Lee
Kitsune Lee

I've always wanted to visit Japan but between my tattoos and crippling social anxiety over worrying about what social rule I broke, has made me realize I'm never going.

Vor 4 Tage
MrSimonPaula
MrSimonPaula

I recently explored your channel and I gotta admit that you are doing great job. Your videos are really fun and quite educational. Keep it up!

Vor year
Killer Snail
Killer Snail

It amazes me how many cultural rules there are in japan. The older culture really clashes with the newer culture.

Vor year
tipsgamez
tipsgamez

The more videos I watch of him the more I'm starting to believe Shogo should run for government

Vor 4 Monate
Maximos
Maximos

I'm actually okay with the importance of meeting in person. I didnt know that was emphasized in japanese culture

Vor 7 Monate
HenshinFanatic
HenshinFanatic

Regarding point 3: Upper and Lower seats, there are also some old European countries with similar mindset, though the specific implementation is different due to different circumstances, and it is being phased out much faster than in Japan. Still, it is not just Japan that has had that idea, just their specific implementation.

Vor 10 Monate
Van darkholm
Van darkholm

I think that meeting up for job interview or some kind of job meeting is normal in every country, it gives the person a good representation on what kind of person you are before hiring you or in meeting, when you see someones face, you know if they are serious about what they are saying.

Vor 11 Monate
Elaine Higham
Elaine Higham

I would be so lost with all this etiquette.....

Vor year
Shafer Hart
Shafer Hart

I will never complain about daylight saving time again.

Vor year
Jane Ferry
Jane Ferry

I remember some of these rules from 1950's USA business practices! Business cards for example!😃

Vor 2 Monate
Paul Hunter
Paul Hunter

I remember my first Corporate job. I worked has 800 order line clerk for Brown Shoe Company. The lowest level workers 80% of the job while higher level executives Arrived late, left office hour early, took two hour lunches. And still managed get paid hefty salaries.

Vor 8 Monate
Alice Garcia
Alice Garcia

When I started leaning Japanese I thought of Japan as the country which looks to the future. Turned out it's quiet the opposite. Thank You for saying the truth and also ruining my ignorant passion for it

Vor 4 Tage
7 swordquanta
7 swordquanta

1. My 日本語先生 used to say that although working in a Japanese company is indeed hard, he said that at least there is some kind of healthcare benefits. Then again, given that things in Japan can be pricey, one would really need to think hard about this. 2. Yeah, I won't even bother staying up for overtime except for extreme cases. I've been hospitalized many times coz of that. I wont even mind of my team mates would go ahead first than me. And I dont really understand why some employees in Japan would even choose to sleep in their work stations during certain times just to be "praised."

Vor 5 Monate
Retard Retarded
Retard Retarded

jesus this makes me appreciate my country more

Vor year
Lisa F
Lisa F

Makes me appreciate the UK.

Vor 9 Monate
helloWorld
helloWorld

Same huhuhu

Vor 10 Monate
チャネルなんちゃん
チャネルなんちゃん

Usa ?

Vor 11 Monate
sparkysparky boomman
sparkysparky boomman

Such cool stuff! learning about where some of the patterns I’ve observed in anime comes from has been quite fascinating!! Love this channel 🌸🇯🇵

Vor year
Barthezan Dersar
Barthezan Dersar

Nice info shogo.... In malaysia, working environment is diferent.... Working hours in malaysia started from 8 to 5 for govt agency or 9 to 5 for the company.... Working long hours?.... In malaysia, we love to work following the time rules.... Thats why malaysia is more simple happy n relaxed working style environment n more publics holidays every years....

Vor year
Anthony Ngu
Anthony Ngu

Maybe in KL but other places like Kuching, they make you do overtime all the time.

Vor 10 Monate
Sorazu
Sorazu

is working 3 different jobs considered a lot in japan? i've worked 14 different jobs in america and i still seem to run into people that have worked many more than me or have worked an insane amount of years at a single company. Also is a 20-30 minute drive considered a very long drive in japan? I travel 1-2 hours to see a friend for less than an hour, 2.5 hours to get to the market and 2-3 hours to get to the shrine i work for These are honest questions, im just curious because it seems very different from my personal life stuff

Vor 9 Monate
Mark Johnson
Mark Johnson

The practice that annoys me the most in America (coming from a person who has both applied to many jobs and also accepted applications and interviewed as a manager) is companies requiring multiple years of experience for an entry level position. It’s impossible to find people to fill a minimum or low wage position who have any significant experience level because they all want a better rate (and rightly so). Conversely it’s very hard to find a job that wants to hire brand new people in any field because a lot of them end up as a loss when they quit 2 weeks in, or it dissent work out in some other way. Just my experience in America I’m sure it’s the same way in a lot of other places.

Vor 9 Monate
Jack Rabbit
Jack Rabbit

I stumbled upon Shogo's videos and am thoroughly enjoying learning about Bushido, Work Culture, and Social Issues in Japan. I appreciate you Shogo for everything you do!

Vor Monat
Sofa Miller
Sofa Miller

Certain Americans sometimes refer to the middle back seat in a car as the “bitch seat.” I’d generally assume that’s the “lowest.” But the front passenger seat, which we call “shotgun” is often thought as a “servile” position, because “shotgun” would historically have been an employee of the hired stagecoach company—not one of the passengers who hired them.

Vor 5 Monate
Edwin Valondo
Edwin Valondo

Thank you for explaining all these things to us foreigners. You speak slowly and clearly with an amazing emotional expression in what your discussing. Just amazing! I love what you do! Keep it up.

Vor Monat
crazed faeiry
crazed faeiry

I'm starting my own company this year, so your video today was very informative.

Vor year
Justin
Justin

Hire me bro

Vor year
Sasha Þrymrsdóttir
Sasha Þrymrsdóttir

when in a taxi but there’s only three customers, will they all sit in the back or will one take shotgun instead of the middle seat? and when they’re just two, will they both sit on the back or will one still have to be shogun for directions and payment?

Vor year
lyhthegreat
lyhthegreat

for me if it's only 2 then we'll both take the backseats, but if its 3 then one will have to seat in the front cause it'll be squeezy otherwise.

Vor year
lucasn0tch
lucasn0tch

10:12 In America, Uber and Lyft now prohibit passengers from riding in the front seat next to the driver due to the coronavirus. It's a shame, as I traditionally sit in the front seat (I like to watch the road while on a road trip).

Vor year
The Gourmand
The Gourmand

I was watching this video while on my stationary bike and I felt more tired listening to the outdated practices of Japan than the workout itself.

Vor 5 Monate
The Devil's Advocate
The Devil's Advocate

If I may ask: Do anyone know if it is considered as impolite to offer help to a superior in Japan? Context: I'm asking because I think I made a mistake with my boss's partner during a project. Now, we were on a deadline, and instead of leaving with everybody, he stayed behind after work hours (almost past 9pm). I had to go back because the alarm system was not activated and he was still working. I offered to help, since I am my boss's assistant on the project, he refused and sounded even angry that I did, so I felt like I offended him. I didn't get any feedback from my boss, but I'm still haunted by that memory and wondering whether it's because my boss just told himself 'well, [me] couldn't know it is impolite'.

Vor 6 Monate
Carlos Peralta
Carlos Peralta

I remember from another video by Shojo that offering help to your boss is the same as insulting them. They would assume that you think they are inadequate at their job and that they don't know any better.

Vor Monat
Hadinata 0112044
Hadinata 0112044

I love the way that you explain the culture and everything! Sending Regards from Indonesia!

Vor 11 Monate
Jaime Veloso
Jaime Veloso

The first time I had the notion of this, was when I first watched the movie "Tampopo". There is a scene during a company dinner where the "lowest ranked" employee is treated as a servant and being treated poorly just because he is the newest in the company... the ending of the scene is amazing and the higher ranks are subtly shown their place while making fools of themselves and that their position actually means nothing if they are ignorant and actually dumb...

Vor 10 Monate
darkalman
darkalman

I'd like to see a part 2 with more examples of Japanese work culture. I noticed you didn't mention the need for punctuality and the after work drinking with the boss There's also the taboo against taking long vacations

Vor 9 Monate
darkalman
darkalman

@Sanchez Gildardo I’d like to know as well cause I don’t drink either

Vor Monat
Sanchez Gildardo
Sanchez Gildardo

What happens if you dont drink? Do they pressure you to do so now?

Vor Monat
RæR
RæR

well in Phillipines we can relate to that also, for me example i worked to my family business specifically to my elder brother and his wife they have this very strict rules that they implement to their employees and including me even tho were related by blood, they force me to work for a whole week because of "lack of employee" to replace me. at first i can understand becoz i thought maybe next week they can look for a solution for this dilemma (coz i got other things to do aside from working everyday) but as weeks goes by they still demand me to work for only one day off and for 15 hours a day (transportation include, coz im riding my bike when going to work which is 30 to 40 mins from the house) becoz lack of employee, this overtime working and just a minimum wage for a day, respectfully i can understand but as days went by my work is gettin harder and harder (im a chef btw) when the pandemic hits i was obligated to deliver also. the worst things is i always feel tired and never got enough rest and when i reason out my cases that im really tired and not feelin well they just tell me "im a weakling for nagging" and "how about me, im doin much more work than you" type thing. They always want u to feel bad for not goin to work but in reality i just want some rest and take note this happened to me before the pandemic for years having 1 day off and 15 hours of work. too much profit in their minds that they forgot that were humans. so in conclusion, i never showed up at work even tho were brothers coz i feel harassed and intimidated in do. such shame how black business mindsets destroys relationships between people and also the harmony of rest and other calling of their employees. now im playing drums to my channel thanks for the support! more power!

Vor 10 Monate
Vilena5
Vilena5

Thank you for sharing. I didn't know the upper & lower seats were that strict. I guessed all correctly but not always with the same logic. Changing a PIN story is crazy, I change mine over the app.

Vor year
Mark J.A
Mark J.A

I don't mind the etiquette but I can't stand the compulsory time wasting and overall ineficiency of decision making. Even though the end result is known by every one from the beginning. Something which also shocks me is how colleagues use their paid leave instead of sick leave when they are sick.

Vor 10 Monate
dragonman101
dragonman101

Hey Shogo, I want to start by saying I love your videos. The quality of the production, the content, the effort you place into the creation of the video is all superb. I have to ask, are your videos also created for English learners? I ask because your actions are very animated, your speech is somewhat slow, and you frequently place gaps in between your sentences (usually every 5 words or so). If your videos are meant to help those interested in learning English, this is perfect! However, if your videos are meant solely to deliver content to English speakers, then, in my opinion, you may want to address these points as they are somewhat difficult to hear/see as a native English speaker. I often notice that I am no longer paying attention to what you say and I am instead focusing on how you are saying it and your actions, which can become a little tiring to try and pull my attention back to your content. This is solely meant as constructive criticism and is in no way meant to be offensive. I just thought you might appreciate the feedback :)

Vor 7 Monate
SlayZeT
SlayZeT

imo, seeting order makes kinda sense for some situations. Seniors won't leave for a while so they sit farthest and juniors closer to the door since they won't be staying there much longer. Car seating is bs as well as elevator one. In elevator, those who leave first will stand near the door and button guy is usually first one to hold the door. All in all these rules will drive me nuts

Vor year
Tanay Pathak
Tanay Pathak

Hi, I've been watching some videos on Japanese work and business culture, presented by you and a few other people native to Japan. I didn't pay much attention to a certain, particular thing untill now but it did pique my interest in the past few videos. Why do you (the people in general) mention how many Japanese companies you've worked for? Why does it matter if it's 3 Japanese companies or 300? Is there a cultural angle to it, or is it just a thing to show credibility?

Vor year
Cherie
Cherie

Aha as an Asian I guessed the seat questions correctly. I'd say Japan and Korea have very traditional hierarchical cultures (worked with Koreans before), and it can be stressful.

Vor 4 Monate
Zan Psimer
Zan Psimer

From the US here and I knew Japanese culture has many rules of respect but I had no idea it was so complicated.

Vor 9 Monate

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