3 Shocking Facts about Japanese Food You Didn't Want to Know About

Gaijin Goombah
Gaijin Goombah

I remember my team teachers in JET would both be in disbelief and harass me for getting fatter as I lived in Japan. Saying it was because all the meat I ate, despite eating food sold in Japan. I remember looking in horror as my kids lunch comprised of rice, noodles, and bread.

Vor 10 Monate
lohphat
lohphat

Meat doesn’t make you fat, sugar makes you fat.

Vor Monat
Yominokun1
Yominokun1

@ZB Sooo, you "did carnivore 2 years, no tracking calories and gained weight", now you "do keto and track calories and leaned out greatly". It's actually pretty easy: If you eat more calories than you use during the day, you'll gain weight. If you eat less calories than you use during the day, you'll lose weight. (generally speaking)

Vor 4 Monate
Fidelity Quester
Fidelity Quester

@muurrarium — Incorrect. Inuit only became unhealthy when they started eating Western foods. If they remained on ancestry diet, they continued to stay healthy. This matter has been well documented. But the processed industrial food industry hates for people to discover this fact.

Vor 7 Monate
Timbot2002
Timbot2002

Hi Shogo-san, one small additional detail regarding historical vs. modern Japanese food culture regarding both carbs and salt. Up until about 5 minutes ago historically, 95% percent of Japanese people also slaved under the hot sun in agriculture. forestry, or fishing (in orher words, just like the rest of the world). A bowl of rice, especially in the morning was valuable to provide energy for a long day of physical labor, and the salt would also be taken care of by the sheer physical effort of the work.

Vor 10 Monate
Nikko Persia
Nikko Persia

Very valid point.

Vor 2 Monate
manicpepsicola
manicpepsicola

@Tai-lun Chou I even feel like a significant amount of modern people don't eat breakfast

Vor 3 Monate
Toy Dubz
Toy Dubz

@Lege the military especially was getting scurvy because they were offered all the white rice they could eat, and because it was the food of the rich, soldiers would eat it in vast quantities. They would skip meat and veggies to consume more rice.

Vor 3 Monate
Sweet Wanderer
Sweet Wanderer

Interesting, I get more hungry sooner eating bread than eating rice. Your personal anecdote really don't mean much imo

Vor 5 Monate
Blairberry
Blairberry

@Lege Some fun knowledge on deficiencies and things that happen due to malnutrition. Beriberi is in there wich is caused by the lack of Vitamin B1 wich might be the one you didn't remember. :) Kwashiorkor - protein deficiency Marasmus - protein and calorie deficiency Anemia - iron deficiency Mumps - iodine deficiency Beriberi - thiamin aka B1 vitamin deficiency Scurvy - vitamin c deficiency Illnesses and such due to Vitamin deficiencies Beriberi, Wasting disease, Scurvy, infections, lowered immune system, blindness, sore throat, swelling, dermatitis, stomatitis, glossitis, cheilosis, migranes, anemia, mouth sores, shortness of breath, skin spots, gum bleeding, poor bone formation or even osteomalacia or osteoporosis

Vor 6 Monate

finally someone is talking about this. i feel global there is a lot of uneducated guesses of what is actually consumed in japan. everything is not served as its original source, there is a lot of sauces, sugar, salt in almost everyting you eat, even the fish has to be marinated in a lot sugars to be a meal, also cooking methods are always fried, or on the hot stove in a lot of vegetable oil which is really bad for your internal health, literally cancerous. sticky rice is the worst rices for you because the amount of starch and how often its eaten. most people today i think it got much worse, most people are living off sweetened drinks, bread and cakes, the traditional foods became very occasional when your in a new prefecture traveling or maybe celebrating. but i had to lose 10lb because all the healthy japanese food was actually causing me alot of weight gain and acne issues because there to much dressing, salts, sugars and starch. you definately should not go into japan thinking stereotypes and actually think about what your actually eating.

Vor 10 Monate
Haru Krentz
Haru Krentz

I think europeans diet is the best, especially the mediteranian region.

Vor 24 Tage
Gwin Willis
Gwin Willis

In my trivial opinion, Japanese people are too focused on buying food that looks pretty or perfectly pleasant. A small, shallow defect does not take away from the nutritional value of a fruit or vegetable.

Vor 10 Monate
Tentegen
Tentegen

Kroger's has a stand in the produce area called "Ugly Fruit". its exactly what you'd think it was. Id get it more if they didnt hide it behind the other "perfect" fruit.

Vor 24 Tage
Hyacinthesize
Hyacinthesize

America is so obsessed with this that most of us don't know what food even looks like. Grocery stores highly regulate the exact specifications of produce and 70% of all produce is culled during the harvest phase, sometimes for things that aren't even imperfections like being a bit small.

Vor 25 Tage
Christina Stearman
Christina Stearman

Yes, but now since food is generally more available, dining, whether out or cooking at home, its no longer just about filling a belly, or having something tasty, but we (humans as a whole) generally tend to “eat” with our eyes too. I haven’t noticed that they buy pretty food any more than people in the US do. We all go for the item that looks the best to us. You wouldn’t buy a package of ground beef that looked grayish or a little off color, you would pick the one that looked the freshest, even though we now know that stores generally fix the meat to look far fresher than it actually is.

Vor 26 Tage
nii
nii

@Gwin Willis oh that's the brand I was thinking of! I'm glad to hear it's still around :)

Vor 5 Monate
Gwin Willis
Gwin Willis

@nii I recently [ in February 2022 ] saw a Youtube ad for a food box of the month club subscription that featured nonstandard shaped food. The box is sold by a company that is called Misfits.

Vor 5 Monate
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez

In general, all cultures have “healthy” and “unhealthy” food, though sometimes a particular culture may be particularly lacking. The connection between beri beri & white rice is one example, but vitamin d deficiency and adding it to milk is an example from the West. I can look at something like Japanese ramen, for instance, and see some concerns if this is a large part of one’s diet, but I could say the same about hamburgers & barbecue.

Vor 10 Monate
Romie Asplund
Romie Asplund

Americans don’t eat BBQ and burgers as often as we Japanese eat ramen

Vor 6 Monate
Peter
Peter

To be fair, a lot of traditional foods tend to be made for people who literally worked the fields to grow crops all day long, or other heavy labor duties Or traditional sweet things, while heavily concentrated in calories, used to be once in a while thing And lastly, you can take any healthy food and make it more unhealthy

Vor 9 Monate
Bichael Stevens
Bichael Stevens

Thank you for addressing the carb and sugar beast. 70s is where we started exploding in obesity, right when the food pyramid, sponsored by big companies, convinced everyone to favor breads and pastas way more than meats and vegetables.

Vor 10 Monate
Pratheep Sirikogar
Pratheep Sirikogar

Could be less salty

Vor 15 Tage
Bichael Stevens
Bichael Stevens

@AmoebaInk The bottom line is my income, physically. And the state of Europe in general now.

Vor 23 Tage
AmoebaInk
AmoebaInk

@Bichael Stevens If you're overweight, the bottom line is you're eating too many calories for your activity level. Reduce portion size, so you can vary your diet more, cut sweets like soda. Beans are the cheapest protein, followed by eggs, familiarize yourself with how to shop produce in season, so it's not as expensive. The relationship between poverty and obesity in the U.S. is complex. Part of the problem is we have an industry telling us that healthy equates to expensive, but that doesn't quite hold up when you look closer. But it's true in certain microcosms like salads costing more than burgers at McDonalds.

Vor 23 Tage
r m
r m

@Clove Beans exactly, this woman is delusional. Only nobility in most places could even afford to eat such a massive amount of meat. Meat has always been an important part of our diet, but not the main component. Even in hunter gatherer times, etc.

Vor 6 Monate
Monika P. Phuengmak
Monika P. Phuengmak

The first time I went to Japan, I couldn't finish almost anything because of how salty it was to me. (I ate a lot of Japanese food in Thailand, but they probably toned down the salt to fit our paletes.) The first half of the dishes were fine, but after that my tongue would start tingling because of the salt or whatever sauce they used. 😂 And that happened every single meal...

Vor 10 Monate
Unknown • 15 years ago
Unknown • 15 years ago

What? I’ve never been to Japan myself but I’ve seen a lot of people who went there and they complimented the food ( especially stuff like ramen ). I’m not saying you’re a liar of course but I’m really surprised 😳

Vor 25 Tage
Monika P. Phuengmak
Monika P. Phuengmak

@Miss Plain Jane That can depend on what kind of food you eat at home. For me, I'm used to food that is less flavored, so Japanese food is pretty salty by my standard. Personally, I haven't had bland Japanese food yet.

Vor 6 Monate
Monika P. Phuengmak
Monika P. Phuengmak

@Miss Plain Jane Usually Ramen (of course), convenient store bento, variations of rice bowls, and anything with meat in it, really. I feel like it might be just business food though, because my host mom during the time I stayed in Japan cooked, and her food wasn't as salty.

Vor 6 Monate
Miss Plain Jane
Miss Plain Jane

What food in particular ?

Vor 6 Monate
Crisjapop cris
Crisjapop cris

I remember until the 1980's food in Japan was way less salty, less sweet and less greasy. Considering that as we age we also loose tasting sensibility - because of this elderly tend to exagerate salt and sugar when cooking or choose practical but industrialized and full of chemicals food - and that Japan has the largest aging society in the world, average food seasoning was probably changed to please nowadays' market.

Vor 10 Monate
Calvini2013
Calvini2013

Yes I live in the US and all the premade Japanese food are overly salty and I end up eating extra rice for it...

Vor 8 Monate
Xanthippus
Xanthippus

Unfortunately, I notice that the modern urban lifestyles disconnect people from their food. A great example is when perfectly edible and nutritious food is discarded because of an appearance regarded as "odd" (such as the cucumbers).

Vor 10 Monate
red 2 the electric boogaloo
red 2 the electric boogaloo

@ProtonCoccus yeah banana bread, apple sauce, you know... amylase really does wonders when it gets going

Vor 2 Monate
ProtonCoccus
ProtonCoccus

Overripe fruits = tasty desserts and drinks

Vor 3 Monate
melelconquistador
melelconquistador

@LegalAssassin honestly yeah, I make apple sauce with my less than perfect pears and apples.

Vor 6 Monate
Finland Journey
Finland Journey

Here in EU we also went for the straight cucumbers for logistics reasons, cos they take less space to ship! However now they're starting to see the light and at least allow the sale of bent cucumbers. And the price is even cheaper, so customers win!

Vor 6 Monate
LegalAssassin
LegalAssassin

@Sharuez JPL YMMV. Steak doesn’t taste good to me, so I don’t want veggies that taste like steak.

Vor 9 Monate
HolyCrapItsALion
HolyCrapItsALion

I really like how you use previous videos to reinforce the points you're making. It's like having an ongoing conversation with you! Thank you for enlightening others about these underlining cultural issues in Japan.

Vor 10 Monate
USS Anime NCC-2400
USS Anime NCC-2400

Also clearing misconception and misunderstanding

Vor 10 Monate
Martag02
Martag02

I always thought that cancer rates were higher in Japan because more people smoke cigarettes, but I would imagine that eating pesticide vegetables wouldn't help, either.

Vor 9 Monate
Gwin Willis
Gwin Willis

I totally agree that consumer demand can change what companies manufacture. Every dollar is a vote. If you buy food with fifteen artificial additives, you are telling the company that made that food to make more of it.

Vor 10 Monate
Gwin Willis
Gwin Willis

@AdoraBell There is a difference between minimally processed and highly processed foods. I do not think you could get any registered dietician to say that caramel coated popcorn, or Twinkies, or potato chips are essential parts of a nutritious diet. The least you can do is not bother to pick up low nutrition "junk" food off the shelf and buy it. The more wholesome and nutritious a food is, the fewer additives it needs. Everyone should strive to eat less "junk" food and more food that has gone from the farm to the grocery store quickly with only minimal processing and packaging. The more processed a food is the more likely it is to have harmful additives.

Vor 9 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

@Gwin Willis In the case of things that aren't necessities, yes. But food is a necessity and when almost everything you buy has the additives, buying without is often simply impossible. Safe food standards were not brought about by people voting with their dollar but a giant media and lobbying campaign that caused the government to enact regulations.

Vor 9 Monate
Gwin Willis
Gwin Willis

@AdoraBell It makes sense for a food production company to decide to save money by deciding not produce the product with the lowest sales. Companies save money by stopping production of products with low sales all the time every day. One way to cause low sales is for people to not buy the product because they think it is a piece of junk not worth their money.

Vor 9 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

It’s not buying or not buying that creates change but lobbying. Make it too unpleasant or expensive for governments to NOT ban certain practices. It’s how safe food laws are passed. Giant media campaigns also work.

Vor 9 Monate
aidelf shitler
aidelf shitler

@Gwin Willis fair

Vor 10 Monate
Иван Кузнецов
Иван Кузнецов

Shogo-san, greatest thanks for revealing such unpleasant secrets about Japan. Japan is widely advertised, but most people do not know about dark sides. That's why the thing you do is so grand.

Vor 10 Monate
Bloody Lyrics
Bloody Lyrics

That's so true. I always cringe when those anime fans (i love anime too tho) want to go to Japan. Another dark side of Japan is, they don't like foreigners. It starts with finding an apartment. Not many Japanese rent to foreigners. Finding friends is super ridicules too because many don't accept you as their "friends".. Etc... They watch Anime and think Japan is like that and realize, it isn't once they're there xD

Vor 9 Monate
Just Endah
Just Endah

@Sakuta Ren Well said. All countries have their own problems.

Vor 9 Monate
Jeff Jacob
Jeff Jacob

I have been disappointed by the ingredients I find in many Japanese packaged foods. I also try to eat a carb restrictive diet so it's hard to find good choices within Japanese cuisine. Regarding salt, if you can reduce your carbohydrate intake significantly, your body should hold on to less salt in the kidneys. I had no idea the rate of diabetes in the Japanese population had risen so much!

Vor 10 Monate
A HA
A HA

Natto is fairly low carb, notably lower than unfermented soy beans.

Vor 9 Monate
LegalAssassin
LegalAssassin

A good way to restrict carbs is find low-carb alternatives. Brown rice has more nutrients than empty-calorie white rice (or you can use riced veggies like cauliflower) and instead of regular noodles you could use shirataki noodles, which are carb-free and more fibrous.

Vor 10 Monate
cnscaevola
cnscaevola

I have super bad migraines, so I have had to adapt “traditional foods” that I like (from all cultures) for a low sodium / other triggers for me. I have managed to make things like miso soup using less sodium by using alternatives to normal ingredients or by using some of a normal ingredient for flavor while using a substitute as well to lessen sodium (low sodium mushroom broth is super helpful and there’s a way to make a super good seaweed broth, katsuobushi granules and I don’t play nicely). Making things from scratch can help as you control what’s going in. So, it may not be “perfect” in the traditional sense, but get the same general flavor across. I like to make different dishes across cultures to make a meal when I cook. However, mental health problems have made this more difficult.

Vor 10 Monate
Geomeo Peoleo
Geomeo Peoleo

@Garry Ferrington I actually get migraines from phosphates and nitrates which are in processed food. The common foods I found that have them are lunch meat, especially stuff like baloney, bacon and hotdogs. I have to get uncured meats which usually cost more. It does cause some issues socially, I have to ask when my friends are having something like a barque ‘What brand is that?’. Used to cause me social anxiety sometimes, as I didn’t want to make a scene. Honestly, in the beginning I would just not eat and say nothing. Had to eat immediate when I got back home.

Vor 26 Tage
cnscaevola
cnscaevola

@LegalAssassin Yup! And I’d swear I’ve used low sodium mushroom broth when I haven’t felt great and wanted fast, but I tend to use kombu. We’ll just say I cheat to try different ways to get the flavor I like. And Eden sells no sodium bonito flakes that work great too! (If you’re in the US.)

Vor 10 Monate
LegalAssassin
LegalAssassin

By mushroom and seaweed broth, do you mean making dashi stock using dried shiitake and kombu? Or something else? I'd like to keep having miso for breakfast without having too much sodium. Yeah, mental health makes it difficult to cook. I switched to dashi granules because making stock every week wasn't feasible with work and school and most of the stuff I use I've made ahead of time or can be put together fairly quickly.

Vor 10 Monate
Garry Ferrington
Garry Ferrington

If you're getting migraines, contributing factors may be phosphates ("natural flavors," which are not natural) and sulfites. Phosphates were banned for some time (like saccarine) due to their highly carcinogenic qualities - so high that they were banned when cigarette smoking was considered a little unhealthy. The Reagan administration brought them back under a new, non-threatening name. 60 Minutes had a report, oh, maybe thirty years ago showing asthmatic people gasping for breath after consuming sulfites. Reportedly some died. It's sulfites which give you a splitting headache when you have a glass or two of wine.

Vor 10 Monate
Amy Carter
Amy Carter

I'm familiar with the 'one soup, three sides' type of meal. It is most certainly not meant for casual consumption. Probably my favorite variation of this is a mushroom and ox tail soup, barley crisps, green onions, and this very creamy, slightly gritty cheeze that tastes somewhat like chocolate. Pairs well with red wine, or sparkling water. It most certainly will leave one with less than stellar breath but plenty of caloric energy for pounding out hot melted iron.

Vor 8 Monate
Mr. Weebs
Mr. Weebs

Japan: our food is not healthy America: amature

Vor 10 Monate
Sierra Lamont
Sierra Lamont

@AJ Shiro Deep fried Snickers. Deep fried ores. Deep fried butter. Deep fried milk.

Vor 2 Monate
Link Skywalker
Link Skywalker

THE LIKES COUNT AT THE NUMBER OF THE BEAST!!!!!!!!!

Vor 4 Monate
紗多瑠
紗多瑠

@Nebula One When Americans started making suburban areas the gas and oil companies had alot of influence ober how things were being built. This is why everything is designed to be with car travel. Now it is too long ago to change anything.

Vor 5 Monate
Nebula One
Nebula One

@紗多瑠 Yes because it's too big. The US is a very spread out place because of how large it is. Many cities are too small or not densely populated enough for public transportation to make sense. And Americans like living in the suburbs, which is even further away from the city. They like living in the suburbs because of the space and room. Since cities aren't densely populated and people like living in the suburbs. Public transportation is impractical.

Vor 5 Monate
sdjsfan4ever
sdjsfan4ever

*amateur…

Vor 5 Monate
hiroman
hiroman

I'd also recommend eating eggs in Japan. Since it is popular to eat them raw, freshness, cleanliness and quality of eggs are very good as compared to other countries. Just a avoid adding too much salt and sugar as mentioned in the video.

Vor 10 Monate
Sammyxcatlover257
Sammyxcatlover257

There process isn't actually any better.

Vor 3 Monate
Clove Beans
Clove Beans

@BaB I prefer white meat over red meat, red meats taste too 'gamey' with rubbery taste and texture and if the meats fat leaks in the juices it gets stuck on the top of my mouth. Plus white meat is way better for health and environment

Vor 6 Monate
Clove Beans
Clove Beans

Eating raw eggs will give you Vitamin B7 (biotin) deficiency since raw egg whites contain anti-nutrient called avidin which inhibits biotin absorption, present in most bird eggs as a passive defence mechanism. Avidin breaks down when cooked so

Vor 6 Monate
LegalAssassin
LegalAssassin

@HadesLordoftheUnderworld Oh, great. You’re here. Enjoy it while it last. You’re getting blocked. Again.

Vor 10 Monate
MercenaryJames
MercenaryJames

This is something I tell my wife all the time. She complains about gaining weight (I myself have gained a bit of weight) and I tell her it's because of all the sugar and breads she eats/incorporates into meals. Getting a Starbucks coffee in the morning, eating bagels for breakfast, some form of rice meal or pasta for dinner, it adds up quick. Lately my diet for work (grave shift) consists of two hard boiled eggs, a cup of yogurt, some form of nut (almonds usually) and some olives. After a week this usually makes me feel so much better, but the only thing holding me back is exercise, which I've been slacking. It's hard, especially when more easily accessible foods are the worst, combined with a busy work schedule. But it helps.

Vor 10 Monate
Wilfried Dehne
Wilfried Dehne

Trying to help. I am an exercise fanatic. Four hours fast biking per day plus one hour lap swimming. Retired. I eat very healthy. Oatmeal with berries for breakfast. Lunch is energy gels plus boiled egg. Dinner is grilled fish or chicken or meat plus tureen of cooked vegetables and salad. To loose weight I must restrict food intake.

Vor Monat
manicpepsicola
manicpepsicola

@AdoraBell yeah I haven't had bagles in years because I haven't been exercising as much everytime I go to the store I'm tempted but its not worth it

Vor 3 Monate
A HA
A HA

Drinking a lot of your calories is generally a quick way to add weight, which is why it is so recommended for those who are underweight. A black coffee or an espresso with just a splash of pure cream isn't going to be a problem, but a large sweet and fatty coffee drink from Starbucks that contains half of all of your recommended daily intake of your calories or more is really bad (and really easy to achieve in a single drink, especially if you are as short woman with a stationary office job). Some short sedentary women have 1200 kcal as daily maintain limit, while professional athletes can need 4000-6000 kcalories to merely maintain their weight at their extreme level of activity and muscle mass.

Vor 9 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

Daily bagels, without also doing a good amount of cardio, will make you fat so fast.

Vor 9 Monate
Montalbano
Montalbano

Actually what changed in the last 50 years is the availability of sugar especially in soft drinks. Sugar especially makes you fat. Japanese rice is totally different is its energy release to rice I get here in Germany normally because the energy release is much slower. The glycemic index of Japanese rice compared to other rice must be way better for you. Anytime I visit Japan I only eat local dishes and I feel was better so I don't think it's unhealthy. But what shocked me was the lack of Honey 🐝 in Japan I blame it on the pesticides. Japan can learn from Europe about organic agriculture.

Vor 10 Monate
Montalbano
Montalbano

@Johannes P Yes that's a problem that should be addressed. The consumer protection organisations should I my opinion get direct funding as a 15% tax on unhealthy food adds. And yes we in Germany tend to eat quite heavy food but nowadays the soft drinks and the added sugar everywhere is the biggest problem. Sugar is addictive that's a cruel fact.

Vor 10 Monate
Johannes P
Johannes P

It's healthier, in a sense that it is LIGHTER, than say, German food (less wheat, practically no dairy). But modern Japanese food is loaded with so much sugar & salt & preservatives that it's really not "healthy" for you in the long run.

Vor 10 Monate
Srajan Verma
Srajan Verma

"Japanese food uses too much carbohydrates, sugar and salts" Indian food: Amateurs!!

Vor 10 Monate
O550Sn942011
O550Sn942011

@Arine Chan Well, Portuguese and German foods aren't too healthy either.

Vor 3 Monate
Chemicalkinetics
Chemicalkinetics

@Sakuta Ren "Same for us mexicans, some places are straight up ADDICTED to coke" --Yes, but is Coke a traditional Mexican food?

Vor 8 Monate
ranjit educ
ranjit educ

@WarpFactor999 Do you have any idea about PPP? What can you buy with 1 USD in USA? What can you buy with 1 USD in India?

Vor 9 Monate
WarpFactor999
WarpFactor999

@ranjit educ True. However, if you don't have rupees to buy food, it doesn't matter how much your country produces. Average income per family according to current government figures is roughly between $4 - $10 per day, which is misleading as the well-to-do (IT folks) dramatically skew the numbers. My Indian friends all (over 20 of them) stated that it was more typical for the general population to earn $2 - $4 per day per family. Example: My Indian boss had a full time live-in maid/cook for $4/day and a driver with car for $4/day back at her home in Kerala.

Vor 9 Monate
ranjit educ
ranjit educ

@WarpFactor999 India is one of the top agricultural producers of the world.....

Vor 9 Monate
Patrick T
Patrick T

Most Asian dishes are like this though in one way, shape, or form. They put soy sauce, fish sauce, oyster sauce or shrimp paste to add that umami deep flavour that also makes Asian dishes taste great which is high in sodium. There are also additives like MSG (in various types of stocks) and other ingredients that prolong the shelf life of various ingredients and enhance the taste. Basically, the less processed the food the better. This applies in any country.

Vor 10 Monate
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez

@AdoraBell Normally, yes. In what is normally considered processing, you’re rarely keeping the boiled concoction (except processed soup).

Vor 9 Monate
A HA
A HA

@AdoraBell boiling destroys heat sensitive vitamins (and any beneficial enzymes), which is why the British navy had issues with scurvy for so long hundreds of years ago: they boiled the lemon juice to preserve it, which destroyed most of the vitamin C.

Vor 9 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

@Rev. Paul L. Vasquez boiling will only remove nutrients if you don’t also drink the stock. Soups are very good for you because you get to drink all those nutrients and you get fiber and hydration. Plus soups are very filling. And you can easily turn them into stews, with the addition of grains.

Vor 9 Monate
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez
Rev. Paul L. Vasquez

@Dragonzaka There are always exceptions to the rule (MSG appears to be one) but processing usually means removing fiber/nutrient layers (grains) and preservation via salt & boiling often removing nutrients in the process. What the original poster says is true as a rule of thumb in nutrition, both historically and contemporaneously.

Vor 9 Monate
Vaedron
Vaedron

This video is both alarming and informative. Our cucumbers are also straight instead of crooked in the United States, I've never thought about that being an unnatural shape honestly! Thanks as always for your knowledge on Japan, Shogo!

Vor 10 Monate
Holly Ingraham
Holly Ingraham

One, those were probably Asian cucumbers, not the English cucumbers found in Western markets. They are chemically different, too, as European cucumbers contain cucubertin which gives some people gas. Two, there are plenty of crooked cukes in European species. Think of all the curved dill pickles you've seen.

Vor 10 Monate
Marina McKinley
Marina McKinley

I think that the misconception about Japanese homogeneity extends to their food, specifically Washoku. In reality, half of the food listed as Washoku came to Japan in the last 250 years after the end of the Edo period. Things like ramen, curry, and fried cutlets are actually relatively new to Japan. White rice, too, isn't particularly "Japanese" either as the traditional rice seen before the Meiji was brown rice. We see this a lot with "new" countries that developed in the last 250 years. Germany, Italy, and even the USA have a sense of urgency when it comes to inventing cultural and historical foundations. Washoku is a platonic ideal about Japanese food, and it reinforces the myth of homogeneity. It is the product of orientalism, imperialism, and nation-builing.

Vor 10 Monate
robert nomok
robert nomok

@Luke Johnson @inventing the Way of the Samurai: Nationalism, Internationalism, and Bushidō in Modern Japan by Oleg Benesch@ probably the most famous work on that theme. He is a bit biased but even those who critiqued him did so for his hars conclusion rather than for subject itself. Basicly bushido just like honor of knights was a concept retconed by authors AFTER age of those samurai and knights. Yes, in some form bushido existed long before 19th centuary but it was very different and more brutal. "Modern" bushido was used during japanese imperial era for citizens and soldier. To apeal to their national pride and give them exaple to follow. Sounds innocent but as any propaganda it goal was to turn people into mindless horde to fule expansionalist ambitions. That one of the reason japanes soldier prefered to throw themselfs on machine gun dots, become kamikaze and commit war crime such as rape, genocide, human experiments and etc. After all they were following their god emperror and defended spirit of samurai nation.

Vor 9 Monate
Luke Johnson
Luke Johnson

@robert nomok I’d like some authentic confirmation on the first statement

Vor 9 Monate
robert nomok
robert nomok

@Luke Johnson Next thing you are going to say is that Bushido is an actual moral code ancient samurai followed and it wasnt invented to reinforce japanese emperealistic propaganda long after age of samurai?

Vor 9 Monate
Luke Johnson
Luke Johnson

I don’t think so

Vor 9 Monate
Mark
Mark

Balance is perhaps what is the most important concepts. Don’t be afraid to eat rice, just don’t eat as much. Maybe a cultural push for using smaller scoops or smaller portions. You don’t have to eat all the rice that’s put in front of you. And maybe try brown rice.

Vor 10 Monate
J. Bradley Bulsterbaum
J. Bradley Bulsterbaum

Great Vid! Feedback: salt intake isn't such a large concern e.g. for causing conditions like high blood pressure *if you don't have a physiological condition that inhibits elimination via the kidneys.* Some conditions like this are specific to eliminating salt, but it can also be from imbalances or damage--such as (perhaps not coincidentally to the subject matter in this video) damage from diabetic nephritis, perhaps. Levels for salt intake where set **too low** on the basis of needs for those "salt sensitive" rather than the norm. [Though] "the norm" may also vary across disparate (genetic) pools.

Vor 9 Monate
紗多瑠
紗多瑠

People also tend to not say how salt is vital to weight lifting. As I lift weights I noticed when I have lower salt content i loose energy super super fast

Vor 6 Monate
V
V

Salt is also a risk for people that drink too little water, but the solution there is more water not less salt.

Vor 6 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

Yup. I learned in my 20s that one of the reasons I was constantly tired and often dizzy is that my salt intake was too low. I have chronic low blood pressure.

Vor 9 Monate
Wilhelm Taylor
Wilhelm Taylor

I believe that the rice eaten in Japan today is way more processed (polished) than in the past. THAT is obviously the biggest source of carbs and it's killing them. Add to that all the inflammatory oils introduced fairly recently - essentially processed machine oil with no food value but high in omega 6.

Vor 9 Monate
Chí Thiện Nguyễn
Chí Thiện Nguyễn

I remember a Vietnamese girl once got in trouble in Japan for bringing 10kg of an Vietnamese food classified unsafety in Japan. The Vietnamese food see brought in is call " Nem chua" it is made of raw port wrapped in banana leaf that been cooked by bacteria and is edible. It sounds strange, but delicious and proven by Australian scientists to be healthy.

Vor 10 Monate
Chí Thiện Nguyễn
Chí Thiện Nguyễn

@melelconquistador yeah, fermented.

Vor 11 Tage
melelconquistador
melelconquistador

Cooked by bacteria? Do you mean fermented or pickled?

Vor 11 Tage
Victory Omorodion
Victory Omorodion

That was a great video. Maybe another alternative is to cook the "washoku" yourself, there you can reduce the amount of salts and carbohydrates. I hope you reach your goal, you all stay healthy and have a great day.

Vor 10 Monate
Optical Raven
Optical Raven

Yep. Every culture has unhealthy food and to be enjoyed in moderation. Thank you for helping us out with making good health decisions while visiting Japan. Arigato, Shogo-san!

Vor 10 Monate
Just Endah
Just Endah

Thank you for presenting this topic. I observed in the last 10 years, organic food prices in Tokyo decrease as demand grows. Also, more and more regular supermarkets make organic foods and products available for their customers. Now I don't have to go to organic supermarket anymore, as nearby supermarkets have them with competitive prices compared to non-organic produce.

Vor 9 Monate
Peter
Peter

While I agree on the general overarching idea, I have to say when it comes down to it, I do not agree that the traditional Japanese food can be seen as unhealthy You can take any food low in calories and drown it in calories That is an individual thing The sugar or added salt in the egg on an inside out roll is not the thing that gives you diabetes Likewise a few grams too much salt every day is not the sole cause for higher blood pressure or heart problems It's a compounding issue, of many different foods and drinks that come together to create the problems I'd venture to say that if the Japanese people would instead of working 2 to 4 hours overtime, and then going out with the boss to drink a lot and eat a lot, rather go home after 8 hours and do something they enjoy, it would be more beneficial instead of leaving out soy sauce Or getting worked up over too much carbs in rice It's not the rice, it's the rice with the beers in the evening It's not the salt in the food, it's the huge amount of stress Lastly, you would have to compare the traditional Japanese food, like hot pots and Ramen with other foods from around the world And hands down it's just plain better Japanese foods are not extremely dense in calories You might have a good amount of carbs in Ramen and sushi But do look at the volume it can give you to fill up the stomach Now of course you might run into pesticides, additives, antibiotics and growth hormones in your foods But that is: A - up to lawmakers to regulate B - for people to care about C - compared to other nations more problematic foods in general D - a global issue anyway In Kenya they might give cows less hormones and antibiotics, but use more pesticides to grow vegetables In Germany we regulate heavily, does not mean meat is free of antibiotics or spinach free of heavy metals

Vor 9 Monate
Corellians
Corellians

There is a big difference if you’re day is spent in the sunny fields doing hard labor than sitting in the nice air conditioning at a desk and working on a computer. The same principles apply to the diet of the South in America and how it impacted the population with disease.

Vor 10 Monate
12345678abracadabra
12345678abracadabra

the japanese have the longest longevity though, surely the food is doing something right. although a typical japanese breakfast has a bowl of rice, and several 'high' sodium sides, you'd have to keep in mind that japanese portion sizes are way smaller. super tiny by western standards i also want to address the fallacy that just because one country bans a substance doesnt automatically means bad. a lot of these studies, as you said, has limitations. for example, pesticides can cause all those things, but many of those studies literally feed them directly to animals, in massive doses way higher than what humans mean. the EU is famous for banning a lot of things

Vor 9 Monate
Jacob
Jacob

As a Sashimi-lover, who eats regularly at the local Sushi place where I live, in Washington State, I was SO RELIEVED to hear that Sashimi is one of the four "exceptions" to all of this culinary doom and gloom! I can continue to eat Sushi without guilt, and definitely as a much better alternative to a lot of the crap that you'd get at your local supermarket! If Sashimi had not made that Top 4... Everyone around me would have likely seen a grown man cry, and that is not a pretty thing to see.

Vor 6 Monate
Browntau
Browntau

The change to white rice over the generations throughout Asia has led to the overconsumption of simple carbohydrates, those with a high glycaemic index. High GI foods are responsible for the increase in Type 2 Diabetes in cultures where previously this was rare. White rice is predominately just starch. As for pesticide exposure, I know first-hand how damaging it can be. Back in the 80's I was exposed to pesticides in industrial quantities due to an accident, pesticides now banned in my own country, but still approved for use in Japan. Now in my late 50's, I'm paying for that exposure. I'd love to see Japan protect its own people by banning the use of chemicals that have been proven dangerous. Shogo-san, thank you so much for this video!

Vor 10 Monate
melelconquistador
melelconquistador

I it hits farmers hard too. They are the people most exposed to it. DW made a documentary about how Rhine valley farmers developed Parkinson disease as a result.

Vor 11 Tage
Stuart Clarke
Stuart Clarke

Really liked this video, was very surprised to hear about the high use of pesticide chemicals. I work for a company in the UK that produces natural pesticides, we do international sales I wonder how we might be able to get into the Japanese market. I only spent 3 weeks on holiday in Japan but one thing I noticed about the food was the lack of vegetables when picking up a bento or ekiben, or buying a meal in a restaurant or cafe. I had to buy fruit and veg smoothies from a kombini to replace the fruit and veg I should have had in my food. It's not all bad I did find a cafe that puts loads of vegetables in it's dishes and was great value for money. I believe the place was called Yokazuna. It's in Kyoto on the southern side of Gojō-dōri and a short walk east from Tanbaguchi railway station.

Vor 10 Monate
BaB
BaB

@AdoraBell Your bowel system (identical to carnivores) and gut bacteria and enzymes (also identical) beg to differ. :-) You absolutely do not need anything but animal products.

Vor 9 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

@BaB really not sure in poe but no. Humans are not carnivores. We are omnivores. We not only can but must eat a variety of food types (and we’re so omnivorous we’ve adapted to eating things that aren’t usually food sources) to stay healthy.

Vor 9 Monate
Stuart Clarke
Stuart Clarke

@BaB I take it that was a joke, but if not; My biology teacher told my class that Homo Sapiens are Omnivores. Meaning we are a mix of carnivore and herbivore. If you want to try a purely carnivorous diet feel free.

Vor 10 Monate
Sheng Long is back!!!
Sheng Long is back!!!

Yes i think your right about the name ive been too that cafe. I thought i was the only one that noticed that about veges.

Vor 10 Monate
Insert Name Here
Insert Name Here

food additive is a questionable subject that varies to be honest, I think people should be careful about judging about those who use additive to avoid premeditated prejudice like what happened to Chinese American be shamed by society for using artificial season when it was proven to cause zero harm. Many middle and lower class Chinese American were out of business because of the whole monsanto drama

Vor 10 Monate
Tea Dreamin'
Tea Dreamin'

Thanks for the entertaining & informative video. I agree with most of what you say. The one point I don't totally agree about is the amount of carbohydrates in the washoku meal. The amount of rice served in a washoku meal is not much compared to the amount of rice served in other Asian cuisines & we do need a certain amount of carbohydrates every day. I know there are a lot of people who think carbohydrates are evil but I've watched videos where doctors recommend eating them & are surprised at hearing people state they avoid them. I think if one avoids eating too much carbohydrates (for example by not eating too many extra servings of rice or avoiding snacks that are mainly made of carbohydrates) one can eat carbs & still remain healthy.😊

Vor 9 Monate
Mimi Sheean
Mimi Sheean

Another great video, thanks! I’ve lived in Japan for 4 years and really can’t eat much of the classic Washoku due to the reasons you cite. It’s often too salty, not enough meat or vegetables and too many starches. Because of this I usually just do all my own cooking. But I have found new restaurants with much healthier and very delicious fare, especially in Kyoto. Keep up the good work!

Vor 10 Monate
Maru
Maru

Thank you! Someone needed to say all of this. My second time living here long term, and I was shocked the first time by the sugar in the eggs, vegetables, meat, every dadblame thing; by the salt content; by the carb amounts; by the perfect and uniform fruits and vegetables -- I didn't prefer them at all, and can't understand why Japanese consumers do. I found it incredibly creepy. And worst of all, the fruit tasted bland and mealy, which was another sacrifice made to uniform shape and size. Now that I'm living here again, really appreciate you presenting some solutions to the problem. Next: Go after the every single individual item wrapped in its own insane amount of plastic problem...

Vor Monat
David from Kyushu
David from Kyushu

Something to consider about white rice is that it wasn't a Japanese food staple until the Meiji era (1868-1912) as it was too expensive for all but the rich to consume regularly. Most people ate millet, which is healthier. When white rice became more readily available the populace switched to the less healthy option.

Vor 6 Monate
Haru Krentz
Haru Krentz

And they were hit by beri-beri endemic!

Vor 24 Tage
Seafood Manager
Seafood Manager

Thanks a lot of this video. As a tourist of many times to Japan, I honestly like a lot of Japanese food with the Keiseki as my favourite to enjoy when I stay in an Onsen Ryokan. I also enjoy a lot of convenient food I can find in the supermarket as well as the fruit in season. In fact, I find it there is a lot of salt and sugar in most of famous dishes such as the Ramen, Okonoyaki, street snacks, etc you name it. It's traditional that when the production of food by farming is hard and therefore people need to eat a lot of rice to produce the energy and salt for sweat. As you point out in the video, nowadays, we don't need that much salt and sugar and starch in our diet and the chemicals and the pesticides in producing the food. It takes a lot of time to educate all the people of the country to understand it especially from the top with less bureaucracy in the line. Again, as a tourist, I will keep eating the Keiseki, Tonkatsu, street snacks and those delicious convenient food in the supermarkets. Thank you.

Vor 2 Monate
Enoch Sun
Enoch Sun

I love how the healthy foods you mentioned at the end are actually some of my favourite foods. Can’t wait to go to Japan

Vor 8 Monate
psyOmicron
psyOmicron

I'd like to add one more point to the "too much carbohydrates" theory. Refined rice as we know it is actually a luxury item just 60-70 decades ago. Back in the 1940s and 50s, most people are still consuming unrefined "brown rice", which are higher in fibre, lower in carbs. So it makes you feel more full while ingesting less carbs. But because refined rice now is much more common and most likely we are still eating the same portions as we did as brown rice, this leads to carb overload.

Vor 25 Tage
Haru Krentz
Haru Krentz

Or back then we had hard jobs that required high calories to sustain, say like farmers?

Vor 24 Tage
xtasLOCO
xtasLOCO

Very informative video! Didn't know about the great amount of additives and pesticides that are used in Japan. Also glad you pointed out carbs and sugar as the culprit. It seems every cuisine in the world has its healthy and unhealthy foods. We just gotta try and monitor what we eat.

Vor 9 Monate
Ezra De Guzman
Ezra De Guzman

I've always maintained that 100g of noodles with 300ml of collagen-rich soup, 30ml of infused soy sauce, 15ml chicken fat, and two slices of braised pork shoulder (plus a bunch of mushrooms, bamboo shoots, etc) is not as unhealthy as it looks if that 300ml of soup fills you up for two meals' worth (I can skip solid bfast if I had this for dinner).

Vor 10 Monate
ssjup81
ssjup81

I lost 60 lbs my first year in Japan but I also had to walk compared to the US where I had to drive everywhere. I gained weight after I moved to Tokyo from Tohoku (Yamagata) because of food conveniences. I haven’t watched yet but the main thing I can assume is unhealthy is the fact that rice and carbs are consumed a lot. I’ve seen Japanese eat a meal with a carb and order rice as a side dish. I also wonder about sodium. A lot of sodium in the foods there, especially stuff like ramen. I would wonder if high blood pressure was an issue in Japan while living there. I will say this…foods there don’t seem to have as many additives or preservatives compared to foods in the US, as from my experience, foods spoil faster in Japan. Edit: Ah, see I was right. Also interesting how it was pointed out the necessity for said foods once upon a time and how it doesn’t fit in a modern setting. The same could be said for those in the US. About 100+ years ago, diseases like diabetes was rare, and meals had heavy carbs. Our “balanced” breakfasts were like a bowl of cereal, toast, and juice, but people had more labor intense jobs so they were working that off and exercising through work. The carbs was good to give them energy. Now, we have a more sedentary lifestyle so that high carb breakfast model doesn’t fit a modern day setting, unless you’re doing those labor-intense jobs 8-10 hours a day.

Vor 10 Monate
Yulia // Юлия // ユーリア // 유리아 //
Yulia // Юлия // ユーリア // 유리아 //

Hi Shogo-san, you made a very informative video again - Thank you for always putting in so much effort and making it fun to watch! I would like to ask you about the Sashimi being safe statement from the book you mentioned because I'm getting different statements from different sources - Since the oceans are pretty much polluted and it's safe to say that many fish eat are contaminated with microplastics, does the book mention something like this at all and still reason why it would be healthy? Or does it not mention this topic at all? I really like your videos I'm currently studying East Asian Cultural studies at a german university so it's a fun way to get my daily dose of insight watching your videos, please keep it up :D

Vor 8 Monate
Op-Ed
Op-Ed

You guys also invented MSG, the reason Japanese food gets such high praise from the international community is largely how it's prepared, there's a certain degree of awe when you see little slices of fish travelling on a mechanised conveyerbelt, or watching a chef juggle fried eggs with spatulas that gives simple comfort food (which is mostly soy and white rice) this element of magic.

Vor 6 Monate
Jim
Jim

I've been eating Japanese food for over 70 years and I'm still alive. Proof that Japanese food is healthy. Seriously though, in a typical Japanese meal you'll notice that the portions are very modest and I think that's one of the reasons why Japanese people live for a long time, we don't over eat.

Vor 6 Monate
Jerrod Frost
Jerrod Frost

Such a good video Shogo! Thank you so much for teaching this. I’ve always been curious about the salt intake for the Japanese and how they handle it.

Vor 9 Monate
Wimplo86
Wimplo86

Thank you for the informative video. I’ve noticed that even the bentos in convenient stores like 7Eleven have been tasting more and more salty these days and I don’t find them enjoyable anymore. I’ve moved to just cooking my own food more often.

Vor 6 Monate
Flo
Flo

Hi, great video :) I always thought that japanese food, similiar to the mediterranian diet, is considered healthy but I couldn't understand how with all the rice, fried stuff etc. But as you now clarified that this is a myth, I wonder why obesety and other health issues are rather rare and japanese people tend to be more healthy or at least are perceived that way (or is this also a myth?). Has this something to do with stuff like Hara Hachi Bu (eat only until you are 80% full) or do they exercise a lot? I imagine working very long, being sleep deprived and eating unhealthy food would lead to more health problems but it seems that this is not the case entirely (except mental health of course). My reply to the video is a bit late but maybe you find your way back to this comment :) Keep going and best regards, Flo

Vor 5 Stunden
CatbitMaster
CatbitMaster

I wonder if the idea of 3 side dishes is very common in east Asian culture and diaspora. I am ethnic Chinese from southeast Asia, but growing up, my mother would always make 3 dishes (usually 1 veg, 1 meat/seafood/tofu and 1 egg) and 1 soup for dinner, but lunch were simpler (usually without soup, but still have 3 side dishes, with the most common lunch being Teochew rice porridge for carbo, stir-fried bean sprout, an egg tofu, and a fried egg). Other than that, I think the emphasis on fresh ingredients is important, as fresh ingredients are unlikely to come with food additives.

Vor 10 Monate
Me Myself
Me Myself

Like your other videos, this presents a well-balanced view of your subject matter. It is refreshing to find a Youtuber who loves and respects his country and culture, and at the same time, is willing to accept that not everything is as perfect as the media would like us to believe. Food is an excellent example. I have always believed that Japanese cuisine is among the healthiest in the world, so imagine my surprise when I was recently diagnosed as diabetic and most of the menu items in my favorite Japanese restaurants are now denied to me. I consider myself very fortunate that my trip to Japan was 2 years ago and I could eat my fill of your country's absolutely amazing cuisine, blissfully unaware of the carb count!

Vor 10 Monate
Rita
Rita

15:16 just to be clear, neither pesticides nor fertilizer have the ability to make vegetable grow straight. really, that would be magic. uneven vegetables are simply discarded or use in food industry

Vor 10 Monate
Ju Gi
Ju Gi

Thank you for covering such an important subject. My friend in Toyama is aware and grows what is allowed. I am hopeful this will change soon in the future. Warm regards

Vor 5 Monate
Cossack TwoFive
Cossack TwoFive

This is surprising. I always thought my country's cuisine is unhealthy due we using a lot of salt and salty ingredients, a lot of sugar and sweeteners, or both at the same time but never thought that Japanese cuisine to have issues.

Vor 9 Monate
Grey Freeman
Grey Freeman

This video was fantastic as usual, but especially interesting to me as a chef and a farm laborer. I respect your bold and critical comments! on society, the choices of consumers, and money. I was shocked to hear a lot of the information you shared, especially about diabetes diagnoses. Thanks for all the work you do planning and creating these videos Shogo-san

Vor 9 Monate
Nightmare0XRanma Bloodedge
Nightmare0XRanma Bloodedge

As a gourmet, this has been very helpful, Shogo-san. Appreciate it from the USA! XD

Vor 10 Monate
Rockawaysiren
Rockawaysiren

Thank you for addressing this. Many companies pour additives into food to keep us coming back. Things like palm oil-which is bad from where it's sourced to when we put it in our mouthes. Some Japanese foods sold here in Canada actually have cancer warnings on them-like nori. I suppose the bottom line is to read ingredients, try to buy the freshest organic produce that you can and understand that living on a konbini/fast food diet is NOT good for you. It's ok occasionally-for convienence or for fun-but see it as just that-a treat! Taking a few minutes to find 5-6 recepies, buying the ingredients and batch cooking one evening a week is one possible answer to eating healthy. ありがとうございます。

Vor 9 Monate
Sparrow Cheeeeps!
Sparrow Cheeeeps!

Your channel is an absolute goldmine of information for anyone wanting to experience some time in Japan Shogo! I have long been fascinated by the culture and tradition of your beautiful country, and visiting Japan is very much on my 'life bucket list'. But your insights are invaluable, I have learned far more from watching your uploads than you could imagine! I am so desperate to visit some time in the future, so thank you very much for all the fascinating insider information that you kindly share with us!

Vor 2 Monate
Ricky911
Ricky911

I'm glad you talked about carbohydrates and sugar. I've tried going on a diet many times and never understood why I never lost weight. It's because I reduced fats and meat. The reality is bread, which I constantly ate, and big portions of pasta were the real reason I wasn't losing weight. Nowadays, I eat more meat than I ever have and I'm losing weight quite easily while also greatly increasing my muscle mass. I also workout quite a lot so salt is something I really need to avoid cramps

Vor Monat
Kit
Kit

The real life hack: cook this food for yourself so you can modify the contents to fit your lifestyle, and select the fresh foods that are safe to eat

Vor 9 Monate
Sylke Krämer
Sylke Krämer

I started cooking Japanese dishes regularly about a year ago and what you are saying here fits with my thoughts about the sugar content in many meals. I love Japanese food as it tastes great but the things I’ve been making didn’t always go along with my mental image of healthy food. I’m trying to keep the portions small for that reason unless it’s something where sugar and carbs are not such a big issue. I’ve only just discovered your channel, there is still a lot for me to watch here, looking forward to that. Thank you for all the interesting insights into Japanese life and traditions! どうもありがとうございます

Vor 6 Monate
JuTau
JuTau

I found it a little hard to get large amount of vegetables at restaurants while I was traveling Japan. But I also consume a lot of veggies compared to proteins.

Vor 9 Monate
Ricardo Ramirez
Ricardo Ramirez

Hi Shogo! Thanks for the video! Maybe, I can't understand all the information you try to transmit (because I'm not a native english speaker [Spanish is my mother language]) but I'm very grateful with the information. As you say, in this side of the Ocean, we believe that japanese food is the healtier or one of the most healty food in the world, but this new vision you explain in the video give us something to think about the "healty" characterists in the food we eat. Thanks for all, and greetings for you and your family.

Vor 10 Monate
Lauren Gardella
Lauren Gardella

Hey Shogo-san there's a subscription grocery service in the USA called "imperfect foods" where they package and deliver the food that would have been otherwise thrown away due to "quality regulations" by other big companies...because honestly the USA has a huge problem with this too...produce, fish, meats, shrimp etc have to be "uniform and perfect" to sell well. It's the illusion of quality. So I wonder if there could be some kind of service like imperfect foods introduced in Japan marketed as a way for companies to reduce waste and budget loss, use all the island resources responsibly and bring quality foods to people looking for a more environmentally friendly way to shop. I wonder if that could be a thing. I know it's culturally not the norm over there or here, but it seems a shift with younger people is happening that is steering us towards a more body friendly and environmentally sustainable way of grocery consumerism. Edit: I make Asian cuisine at my house with organic ingredients and without salt (maybe a small pinch of Himalayan pink salt) or MSG and I've been complimented by all of my friends that it still tastes like restaurants and that freakin melted my heart for sure!!💖 I absolutely love cooking different cultures foods. I try to make them the healthiest I can. My mom and brother have horrible reactions to gluten and msg so I've made substitutes. I hope I can keep cooking like that when I eventually try to live in Japan.

Vor 6 Monate
Stefan Antonik-Seidler
Stefan Antonik-Seidler

Thank you for another great video. The idea of the healthy Japanese cuisine is very popular in Europe and it propably still is MORE healthy compared to most of our traditional food (at least in Austria). But of course too much carbohydrates = sugar and salt is unhealthy no matter where and how you eat it. With the exception maybe of whole grain products (which are popular in Austrian/German bread-culture). I learned that if the grain is not refined too much, the bloodsugar level will rise much slower than with refined/"white" grain products. My question is also: Could washoku not still be healthy, when you prepare your traditional soup and side dishes yourself? When you control the amount of rice and salt and sugar added?

Vor 10 Monate
Lesteryay Trippy
Lesteryay Trippy

This is a nice reality check about how we perceive Japanese food and health. I guess modernization and a sedentary lifestyle have impacted our traditional cooking.

Vor 9 Monate
Steven Attwood
Steven Attwood

When I lived in Aomori, alot of food was heavy food, especially fried. I definitely felt myself gaining weight in the bad weather months.

Vor 2 Monate
Elizabeth Roane
Elizabeth Roane

Love your videos! I too had an ideal way of seeing and eating as well as cooking bento for myself as I am not a fan of many red meats here in the US.. I know if I snack on Japanese snacks like Pocky and milk teas and Japanese junk foods..Please keep making your Awesome videos!!

Vor 17 Stunden
John Jandernoa
John Jandernoa

Finding organic produce at stores even in a big city like Nagoya is such a pain! Thank you for the links to the delivery services!

Vor 8 Monate
Visuals of Sora
Visuals of Sora

I always thought in the back of my mind that something must be off about the fact that soy sauce, mirin, sake and sugar is commonly mixed into Japanese food. Isn’t that just heaps of salt and sugar?

Vor 9 Monate
Cheryl Kiai
Cheryl Kiai

I absolutely love Japanese food & truly appreciate much of the culture. My nephew has resided in Japan for 15yrs and now lives in Okinawa (only recently after moving there from Tokyo) with his Japanese wife and my new great niece (both of whom I adore😸). My nephew told me once that sashimi & sushi(with raw seafood) are not healthy & were strongly advised to be restricted to once per week because of the high levels of Mercury in them (when eaten daily) because it caused hair loss and infertility! The famous life coach Tony Robbins actually got mercury poisoning from eating salmon & salad daily. I never thought I would see the day that eating fish daily could actually be UNHEALTHY!! So regrettably I think Japan’s nutrition experts have to re-examine classifying sashimi as HEALTHY these days😿😕!

Vor 2 Monate
Cheryl Kiai
Cheryl Kiai

The traditional Okinawa diet has been touted as HEALTHY like the Mediterranean diet!

Vor 2 Monate
Seven Proxies
Seven Proxies

Best take away from this: don't worry so much about carbs, fats, sugars and salts. Worry more about artificial sweetners, food dyes and chemical preservatives.

Vor 9 Monate
CheshireKat
CheshireKat

Sugar is an issue in all industrialized countries... but I honestly believed that it was less of an issue in Japan... 1 out of 6 people have diabetes or are pre-diabetic? Holy cow!

Vor 10 Monate
Ruby Ocampo
Ruby Ocampo

@Rado But lord forbid if they’re fat!

Vor 3 Monate
Lucyla99
Lucyla99

@Dantho Victcarbonated drinks aren't healthy in of themselves, however they tend to be sugary so they generally are unhealthy. (For example carbonated juice or water is as Healthy as uncarbonated)

Vor 8 Monate
Dantho Vict
Dantho Vict

@Rado dont forget carbonated drinks, that contain a lot of sugar.

Vor 10 Monate
Rado
Rado

Tbh, following many young Japanese folks on Twitter I can see it. They seem really fond of sweets, ice cream, and sugary (alcoholic) drinks.

Vor 10 Monate
Mu Mu
Mu Mu

Hi Shogo. Thankful for always putting out educational videos about the social issues in Japan.

Vor 10 Monate
BlackKnightJack
BlackKnightJack

My understanding with ramen specifically (since that's the main Japanese dish I concern myself with) was that it wasn't particularly healthy, but at least more healthy than instant noodles. Makes sense considering tonkotsu ramen broth relies on you emulsifying as much pork fat and collagen as possible until the broth looks like milk. It also probably doesn't help that chashu is made from the fattiest parts of the pig (It doesn't HAVE to be made from the belly, but the alternative of the shoulder still has fairly high fat content).

Vor 11 Tage
Destiny
Destiny

The uniformly shaped vegetables in supermarkets are not an exclusively Japanese problem. We do it in Germany as well, and I think most countries have those standards. And it is a shame, because the food waste this causes is outrageous.

Vor 10 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

The ugly food goes into pre-cooked items and things like sauces or ready to use stocks. A lot of food waste happens when crops aren’t harvested and when supermarkets toss out unsold food.

Vor 9 Monate
Garry Ferrington
Garry Ferrington

In the US, we do this with hybrids which are beautiful and have no taste.

Vor 10 Monate
ChocoParfait
ChocoParfait

Omg thank you for making this video!! When I was there I saw a lot of food that didn’t look healthy or meals that weren’t balanced at all, yet people keep saying that Japanese cuisine is healthy, and well I don’t really agree For example I didn’t see many vegetables

Vor 10 Monate
ChocoParfait
ChocoParfait

@初台駅タダシ yes I agree with you! When I was in Japan I saw restaurants serving “unhealthy” and unbalanced meals but I’m sure that’s not what Japanese usually eat at home, and that’s certainly healthy, since people live so long

Vor 10 Monate
初台駅タダシ
初台駅タダシ

Japanese cuisine as in karaage or ramen are no doubt unhealthy as a daily meal but an actual homemade, whole foods meal made with balanced nutrition in mind would be the actual ideal Japanese meal. I’ve seen how most non-Japanese learn what Japanese food is and it’s usually through what is served at restaurants pandering to American palettes. Because of that, restaurants here in California are mostly izakaya, yakiniku, or ramen shops. Also someone saying “Japanese food is so healthy” while eating something clearly fried and dressed in mayo is just making excuses to eat unhealthy.

Vor 10 Monate
Eugenernator
Eugenernator

Leaving out the obviously unhealthy fried stuff and heavy broths, it's generally fine when you start comparing Japanese food to foreign cuisines particularly in NA and SEA. Portions are generally quite small too. Obviously it wouldn't be a good thing if it continues to go in this direction, but maybe you could get the conversation started, to which I think subtitles would be good to add, or perhaps redo it in Japanese. I find myself wanting to show your videos to my friends because you often present a different perspective and yet are very thorough in your analyses, but unlike me they don't speak English.

Vor 10 Monate
MyTech
MyTech

I occasionally shop in oriental markets in the USA and I have always been shocked by the highly artificial nature of many products, and completely unnecessary additives. I did not know if it was caused by import factors, or if it was common in the original culture. The products also seem to have unreliable ingredient lists, often failing to list coloring when there is obvious coloring added and I am sure other additives are not listed.(eg Any artificial sweetener is very noticeable to me) Often I must go to large effort to make ingredients for myself, because the only options for purchase are completely artificial imitations of the original. For pesticides there is a 4th factor, likely more important that the look of vegetables, limited land and expensive resources. The pesticides can reduce crop failures which is much more important when there is no net surplus production, they can be a cost reducing substitute for machinery that operates on petroleum, and pesticides help to get maximum return from fertilizer costs. When resources and land are plentiful it is economical to plant excess to account for losses and simply discard damaged portions of crops, as a partial substitute for pestcide.

Vor 10 Tage
Dakao Do
Dakao Do

This was a video about food, but there are confounding factors that people overlook when ascribing Japanese/Asian healthiness/skinniness to only washoko or other food diet as a single simplistic cause. Acc to one study, average steps walked per day: US: 5100 (barely the lowest of but comparable to France, UK, etc) Japan: 6100 Western Australia: 9700 (example of high end of range, comparable to Switzerland) Caloric intake daily (kCal) by country: US: 3800 (again, highest of but comparable to France, UK, etc.) Japan: 2800 Australia: 3200 (fun math: it would look like a base activity level of walking 2-3 steps per calorie/kCal consumed may be a decent start for weight control.) US FDA recommendations and food labels describe daily caloric intake of 2000 calories, meaning the AVERAGE US person consumes nearly twice the FDA's reference amount (with some people eating less, and some eating more). Portion control is also not a complete single answer, just as macro nutrient proportions aren't. Weight loss/control is a complex topic that varies by person, exercise/activity level, and health background. Anecdotally, I personally used to eat 3500-4000 calories a day but trained more than enough to keep my weight under 180 lbs / 80 kg at 12-15% body fat. Nowadays, I'm 10 years older, train far less, often eat less than 1800 calories a day, but am slowly going over 200+ lbs / 90+ kg with 25%+ body fat. Correlation is not causation. Humans naturally tend to look for the most immediately apparent explanation. Shogo touched on this in his explanation of research on how fat in your body doesn't come from dietary fat.

Vor 9 Monate
Eliel Lopez
Eliel Lopez

Very informative! Thank you for sharing this with us. I am also relieved to see that sashimi, which is also one of my favorite foods, is also on the healthy side ! I really like your chanel. Keep posting ! 😀

Vor 23 Tage
sanserif
sanserif

Great and unique topic. After going on a keto diet, I agree, the Japanese diet is problematic. I tried to find umeboshi and furikake without additives and sugar/sugar substitutes but couldn't find any. The high sugar/carbs is probably causing insulin resistance and many people in Japan carry fat inside their organs but look thin, and Alzheimer's. Remember high carbs hidden in legumes like soy. I remember an old guy in Okinawa when asked his reason for health said 2 things: growing his own vegetables and intermittent fasting (he said, danjiki, danjiki). That sweet okashi before matcha is baaaaad if daily. BTW, if you stop eating carbs, you don't need to drop the salt intake too much, just a little, and keep those that are part of fermented foods, organic ones.

Vor 10 Monate
The Git Gud Grrl
The Git Gud Grrl

My BF was making us delicious fresh Ramen everyday and I gained so much weight! But, it was mostly water gain because of the salt 😭 now it’s just a treat.

Vor 9 Monate
VRfan - Train Videos Downunder
VRfan - Train Videos Downunder

I spent 3 weeks in Japan in 2018 and lost 4kg. I went back in 2019 for 2 weeks and lost 3kg. I definitely wasn't worrying about what I ate (or drank for that matter haha)! With that said, the level of pesticides is a bit concerning :/

Vor 10 Monate
AdoraBell
AdoraBell

If you were on vacation it is likely you were doing a lot more walking than you normally would.

Vor 9 Monate
Okami-sama
Okami-sama

Thx for the video, but I think it would be helpful if you especially showed what the kanji/names of these additives/pesticides are so that we could watch out or also confirm it with our own research.

Vor 10 Monate
Fluffcandy
Fluffcandy

This is such a good video and an important topic not just in Japan~ we should be more educated in what we eat and not just buy food for what they look like Thank you so much~

Vor 10 Monate
Dingus Doofus
Dingus Doofus

The scientific consensus on weight gain was always clear. It's energy surplus. It doesn't matter if this comes from carbohydrates, fat, or proteins. The body can and does synthesise all of that into fat and put it into fat cells. If you eat too much carbohydrates (minus fibre), eat too much protein, or eat too much fat, it's all the same as far as weight gain is concerned (it gets more complicated if you look at the detailed health effects of each of these). The fact is that the energy density of fat is very high, which is why it was portrayed as causing overweight as people ate more and more fat. It only takes a little fat to providea lot of energy. But carbohydrates are powerful drivers of weight gain on their own, because of their sheer amount and ubiquity. Carbohydrates are everywhere! Protein is less of an issue because most of it is used to build cells and it easily fills the stomach. But if you eat too much lean meat, it will still drive up your energy surplus and contribute to overweight. A balanced diet is key, and always was. A higher proportion of veggies and fruits (but especially veggies, fruits still have a lot of sugar) is a great way to ensure it remains balanced, both in macronutrients and micronutrients. But eating more and more food is not the answer. Only eat as much as you need, of any food. That is the answer. KNowing how much you need of each is tricky, but there are ressources for that, the simplest being "food pyramids".

Vor 6 Monate
haha huhu
haha huhu

you should check the pesticide company in Japan. It might have influence from foreign companies that can force the government to keep using it It is very strange that Japan can't follow US and EU standard on this matter

Vor 9 Monate
Kiku Kusanagi
Kiku Kusanagi

Thank you for the very informative video, Shogo-san. Apparently, all of my favorite Japanese food such as tonkatsu, miso soup, sushi, tsukiyaki, tacoyaki, etc., are the 'food to die for'.

Vor 10 Monate
Happy Cook
Happy Cook

I lived in Tokyo in 2000 and lost 100 pounds without dieting. Why? Well we ate in private school's cafeteria. The portions were incredibly tiny! There was rice at every meal but portion was 3/4 cup for males and 1/2 cup for females. They did the 3 sides + soup. The 3 sides were vegetable based and each was maybe 2 or 3 mouthfuls. The soup was clear, never cream, and had veggies sometime tofu. For breakfast there was somtimes fish (yuck),more often egg. Lunch had bits of meat or chicken. Supper was light. Sometimes we got 1 or 2 bites of seasonal fruit. The yummy Japanese food like tempura, sushi, curry rice, tonkatsu, ramen NEVER were served to us! Those are considered special occasion/restaurant food. I was so hungry the first month, I snuck away at breakfast and bought a HUGE nikuman (big meat filled dumpling wrapped in a sweet bread, plastic sleeve with 2 pieces big, fluffy raisin bread, and a yogurt. Cook hunted me down to find out why I wasn't at breakfast and caught me stuffing my face alone in my classroom before school started. She took one look at my "feast" and shook her head. She sent the head Japanese teacher to inform me those foods were loaded with chemicals and unhealthy which I might not know because I couldn't read Japanese (or speak it). Needless to say, it was a mortifying experience. I also walked or rode bike every where because even public transit is expensive. Can easily drop $5 a day riding the bus and the bus is cheaper than subway. If my school was any example of what they eat, they eat a lot more veggies than I ever imagined anyone could eat, soup, and rice. They treated meat like a condiment or decoration. The last time I was in Japan 3 years ago, I was shocked to see porky kids and adults! They used to be rail thin. Also, noticed the proliferation of processed foods and ready meals everywhere plus portions look bigger to me than in 2000. It surprised me.

Vor 10 Monate
Ernie S
Ernie S

Some of that may be because, as with any country my friend, there is often GMO, genetically modified foods and liquids, and/or the way the food is made in manufacturing or shipping. This is not just Japan.

Vor 19 Tage
madbug1965
madbug1965

Being JA having to give up rice was the worst. Having type 2 and high blood pressure, I can relate to this video. If you take in too much salt, you can switch to half salt with half the sodium.

Vor 9 Monate
Jonunciate
Jonunciate

In the US we have a big problem with approving more food additives than most developed countries. It amazes me that Japan somehow managed to approve more! However, I'm not going to stop importing Japanese snacks. 😎👍

Vor 10 Monate
KeylJ yehn
KeylJ yehn

Hello Shogo-san, this was very interesting but, as you mentionned at the end of the video, regarding all the informations and theories you presented here, I am now extremely interested in finding out why japanese people have the higher longevity and are overall thin. I doubt you have time to answer this comment but I am beyond excited at the idea that you would work on a video to study those topics !!!!!!!

Vor 10 Monate
DarthGohma
DarthGohma

Actually, excessive salt only causes cardiovascular issues in the presence of low potassium. High sodium intake is actually very important in the context of a low carb or ketogenic metabolism and the body regulates excess sodium very well. Especially if you fast regularly. High salt intake is very important when your insulin is low because your body doesn't hold water nearly as much and you'll deplete it much faster than people following conventional dietary practices.

Vor 6 Monate

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